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Anonymous Letter to MLK

Sunday, April 9, 1967

In this letter addressed to Rev. Martin "Coon" King, the writer--who does not identify himself-- maintains Dr. King is "damag[ing]...the negroes [sic] cause" by focusing on giving them "handouts," as opposed to "improv[ing] their morals."

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Suggested Approach and Chronology for St. Augustine

Wyatt Tee Walker writes Dr. King about the purpose, need and strategy for the St. Augustine demonstrations. In this letter there are details for proper attire and a schedule of demonstrations.

Nature

Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Letter from Edwina Smith to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Ms. Edwina Smith writes Reverend Shuttlesworth regarding a SCLC meeting and encloses a round trip plane ticket.

Letter From MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Friday, February 9, 1968

This response letter, dated February 9, 1968, was addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Letter from Walter Simcich to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

Walter Simcich invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto, Ontario. He then asks Dr. King to suggest an alternate civil rights speaker if he is unable to attend.

Letter of Thanks From MLK To Reverend Taylor

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Dr. King writes to Reverend Gardner C. Taylor, the pastor of the Concord Baptist Church of Christ, to thank him for his support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Support from Lawyer Grenville Clark to Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech

Thursday, July 28, 1966

In this letter to U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech, Grenville Clark requests a reply to Dr. King's "devastating" public statement in the New York Times about proper enforcement of the 1965 voting rights law.

Letter from Georgia Miller to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967

Georgia Miller informs Reverend Abernathy and Reverend Young that she can no longer contribute funds to the SCLC due to their support of the New Politics group.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King describes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy's efforts as "courageous" and "effective" in guiding Congress to establish the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Inter-Office Telephone Extensions

Documented are the telephone extensions for the SCLC office staff.

Christology and Anthropology

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher, a German philosopher, regarding the universal understanding of sins.

Program From MLK's Nobel Peace Prize Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

This is the program from a Recognition Dinner honoring Dr. King sponsored by the Citizens of Atlanta following his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. It took place at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel and included an address by Dr. King.

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

Friday, April 5, 1968

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Letter from Jim E. Hansen to MLK Regarding Support for Presidency

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

Jim Hansen, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68, a Time-Life sponsored national presidential primary at the College of Southern Utah, wrote to MLK in support of Dr. King as a presidential candidate. He requested materials for the April 1968 event which took place on the college's campus.

Letter from Wisconsin Branch of the NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1961

The Racine Chapter of the NAACP Banquet Committee invites Dr. King to speak at their annual banquet.

Letter from MLK to Senator Edward V. Long

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Senator Long's support in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Summer Session Banquet: The Role of Education in the Civil Rights Movement

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King gives an address on the role of education in the civil rights movement at Syracuse University's Fourteenth Annual Summer Session Banquet.

Schools' Mobile TV Unit Tapes Dr. King's Speech

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

This news article highlights Darien, Connecticut for the use of their mobile television unit to tape Dr. King's speech. The mobile studio was moved to Stamford High School, where students filmed the speech. Ten other schools in the area were able to see Dr. King speak with the help of this new technology.

Meet the Press Interview with Roy Wilkins and MLK

Sunday, August 25, 1963

This document is a transcript of NBC’s “Meet the Press” televised press conference with Dr. King and Roy Wilkins. The program is moderated by Ned Brooks. Frank Van Der Linden, Robert MacNeil, Richard Wilson, and Lawrence Spivak are panelists. Some of the topics covered are the goals of the March on Washington, a concern about whether the Civil Rights Movement is pushing too hard, and past political affiliations of Bayard Rustin.

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Curtis J. Jackson

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King notifies Rev. Jackson that he will not be able to travel to Orlando, but offers that he'll hopefully be able to accept more invitations in the near future. In addition, he requested that Rev. Jackson come and visit the Annual Convention of S.C.L.C. in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from William Connor to MLK

Saturday, August 12, 1967

William Connor encourages Dr. King to continue his efforts to speak the truth and practice Christianity. He emphasizes that there is no need to ignore the important issues of our time. Connor states, "Now, we've either got to put up, or shut up-as the saying goes."

Get Well Letter from William H. Allen, M.D.

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

William H. Allen, M.D. sent this letter to Dr. King expressing sympathy to Dr. King, for his nearly fatal stabbing. Dr. Allen, further into the letter, encouraged Dr. King to continue to pray in order to eliminate evil in the world and hoped he will remain protected to continue his mission for freedom.

MLK: A Profile In Leadership

Outraged by recent allegations, civil rights leaders rally to unify their support of Dr. King and his position on the War in Vietnam. This document encourages his supporters to unite for a common purpose.

Telegram from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mr. Brown confirms the departure date for the Nigeria Peace Mission with Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Dr. and Mrs. J.R. Arnold about a Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. J.R. Arnold for their financial contribution to the SCLC while also explaining why such contributions are important.

Letter from Sixth Grader to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Kathy Brewster, an African American sixth grade student from Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude towards Dr. King for helping the Negro race.

Letter Dated 12/7/62 from MLK's Secretary to Mel Arnold

Friday, December 7, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a enclosure of the sermon entitled "Broken Dreams."