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"Memphis, TN"

Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), Arkansas (AR)

This document provides a detail description of Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding, a candidate for the Democratic primary in the 53rd assembly district.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Letter from Rachelle Horowitz to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 7, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Administrative Secretary for the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, Rachelle Horowitz apologizes to Dora McDonald for an apparent misunderstanding regarding pamphlet pricing.

Telegram from MLK to President Lyndon B. Johnson

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to conduct a full investigation concerning the government's involvement with Medgar Evers' suspected murderer.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Memphis, TN

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Letter from MLK to Billy Fleming

Tuesday, April 24, 1962
South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King writes Mr. Billy Fleming expressing how lovely his visit was to the Fleming-Delaine Funeral Home. Dr. King also expresses how loving the people of Clarendon County were, which he will remember forever.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King writes notes regarding the story of Jesus and the healing of the paralytic. Jesus asked the crippled man, "will thou be made whole?" Dr. King states that some people are happy to be crippled because they lack the responsibilities of life that a healthy man has, and many people cater to their needs, but cautions against this attitude.

"Discerning the Signs of History"

Sunday, November 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."

Pledge Card: Get Rid of Wallace

Alabama (AL)

This adverse advertisement published by the SCLC encourages Negro residents of Alabama not to vote for Governor George Wallace.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Merrill

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Boston, MA

Dora McDonald replies to Merrill's request that Dr. King nominate nonviolent activist Danilo Dolci for the Nobel Peace Prize. Known as the Sicilian Gandhi, Dolci opposed poverty, social exclusion and the Mafia. Merrill was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College and King's personal friend.

Telegram from Congressman Charles E. Bennett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Florida Democratic Congressman Charles Bennett informs Dr. King that the Celler Bill does not apply to all states, though he feels that it should. The Celler Bill, introduced by New York Democratic Congressman Emmanuel Celler, would prohibit the purchase of rifles, shotguns and handguns by direct mail.

War

Dr. King cites a quote concerning "war" from Oswald Spengler's "The Return of the Caesars," an article featured in The American Mercury.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nemichandra

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding the structure and function of the SCLC. He informs the inquirer that he is enclosing pamphlets and brochures in hopes that the literature will successfully address all of his questions.

Fight for Open City

Sunday, August 21, 1966
Chicago, IL

Included in The United Council Sentinel, is an excerpt featuring an initiative of Dr. King and various others: Operation Breadbasket. The author explores the details of this specific movement.

United Nations Association-Hawaii Chapter

Monday, April 8, 1968
Honolulu, HI

The card, shown here, is an expression of condolence and gratitude from the Hawaii chapter of the United Nations Association, in the form of a "lei of love".

Letter from MLK to William B. Simpkins

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Simpkins, in which Simpkins discusses freedom and perfect justice. Dr. King thanks Simpkins for the letter and comments that Simpkins' letter has provided "additional food for contemplation."

Letter from MLK to Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Connecticut (CT), Hartford, CT

Dr. King commends the Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends for pursuing an initiative to buy a home in an all white section of Hartford, Connecticut. He proudly supports the project and extends his best wishes.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King highlights a quote from "Evil and the Christian Faith" by Nels F S. Ferre regarding Jesus and his relationship with humanity.

Letter from Illustrated World Encyclopedia to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
New York (NY)

Bobley asks Ms. McDonald if Dr. King will allow a reprint of one of his articles to be published in the Illustrated World Encyclopedia in lieu of King writing a new piece.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965
Lowndes County, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from Lance Redford to Mrs. King

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Lance Redford, a student in New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King.

Letter from Theresa Sutherland to Coretta S. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Theresa Sutherland sends her condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

Sin

Dr. King references Dewey and his view of evil.

Letter from Philip E. Jones to MLK

Thursday, October 6, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), INDIA

Philip E. Jones, a SCOPE volunteer, recollects a "terrible night at Canton, Mississippi" where he met Dr. King and was assigned the duty to find Rev. Young. Jones invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights issues at Juniata College where he is enrolled.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968
Washington, D.C.

An anonymous supporter sends an encouraging letter to Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Elaine Walster

Thursday, January 4, 1968
New York (NY)

Dr. King writes to express his appreciation for Dr. Walster's encouraging words concerning his speech to the American Psychological Association. Dr. Walster is a professor at the University of Rochester in New York.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

New York, NY, EGYPT, ISRAEL

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

Letter from M. A. Lockhart to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1963
New York, NY

M. A. Lockhart writes Dr. King to express pleasure in speaking with Dr. King during his visit to New York. Lockhart expresses interest in the development of the Selective Patronage program and asks that Dr. King make contact if he is in New York.