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"Memphis, TN"

Man

Dr. King writes his thoughts on man.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

MLK's Gadsden, Alabama Rally Speech

Friday, June 21, 1963
Alabama (AL)

This transcript of Dr. King's address during the Gadsden, Alabama Rally addresses the ills of segregation in the South. He professes that the accusation of civil rights demonstrations being responsible for creating tension is equivalent to blaming the act of robbery on the wealth of man.

Program from Community Salute to MLK: Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York, NY

This program is from the Community Salute to Dr. King that occured in New York City following his being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Moral Law

Dr. King documents a statement from the Federal Council of Churches concerning the significance of moral law. King writes, "This statement from the Federal Council of Churches is pertinent."

Letter from Telly H. Miller to MLK

Tuesday, November 15, 1966
West Virginia (WV)

Telly H. Miller, a graduate of the Morehouse School of Religion of the Interdenominational Theological Center and pastor in a West Virginia church, invites Dr. King to their Centennial. Pastor Miller requests that Dr. King deliver the Centennial sermon and explains that his coming will be a "great help" to the community.

Letter from Mary B. Courtney to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965
Oklahoma (OK), Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Mary B. Courtney requests Dr. King's help to sell her property. She explains to him that the house has been on the market for three years in St. Petersburg, Florida, and while "several colored people" have contacted the real estate agency with interest, they are dissuaded by the lack of African Americans in the neighborhood. The author suggests that Dr. King contact some of his associates in St. Petersburg to assist in the matter.

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

Draft of Dedication Page for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a rough draft of the dedication page of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait;" the draft reveals Dr. King's wish for his children.

Financial Breakdown of Individual Contributors

Dr. King lists the monetary calculations of those who have individually contributed to the "Souvenir Program."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eugene Exman about MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1961
New York (NY), Missouri (MO)

Ms. McDonald writes Harper & Brothers executive to confirm receipt of his letter to Dr. King dated June 19, 1961 requesting a proposed timeline for the completion of a forthcoming book. Ms. McDonald reassures Harper and Brothers that Dr. King is adhering to the request and will take five weeks off to ensure completion.

Jenner School Parents

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
Chicago, IL

Presented here is a rough draft of an address delivered by Dr. King to the parents of Jenner Elementary school located in Chicago, Ill. Dr. King advises a plan to counteract deplorable school conditions as well as the misappropriation of tax dollars.

MLK's 'People to People' Column on Education

Saturday, May 15, 1965

This article by Dr. King appeared in the New York Amsterdam News. He discusses the segregation of schools and how it is harming African American children and their opportunities.

Letter from Clara Horner to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968
Tennessee (TN)

Clara Horner criticizes the methods of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes that instead of marching, Dr. King should work in higher education.

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS)

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

Letter from Silvio Conte to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Massachusetts Congressman Silvio Conte thanks Dr. King for a previous telegram sent to him regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act. Conte highlights his longtime support of the Civil Rights Movement and pledges his efforts to assist in passing this historic legislation.

Preaching

Dr. King notes three points about preaching.

Letter Regarding MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
Kentucky (KY)

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.

Selma Friendship Day Report

Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

This document highlights information surrounding "Selma Friendship Day," which was a white-led counter-protest intended to offset the effects of Kingian boycotts. This counter-protest was met with a demonstration, in which 120 pro-Kingian persons were arrested and the local SCLC office was barricaded.

Anonymous Letter to Paul Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Washington, D.C.

The anonymous author of this letter addresses a "Paul" Abernathy to speak against the March of the Poor People's Campaign after Dr. King's death. The author makes statements suggesting that the efforts on behalf of Abernathy are forced upon the government through such demonstrations.

Social Philosophy

Dr. King documents Paul Tillich's view towards Marxism.

Letter from Bob Detterick to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
New Mexico (NM), Atlanta, GA

Bob Detterick, chairman for "Choice '68" organization at Western New Mexico University, requests that Dr. King send poster, pictures, pamphlets to promote him as the next presidential candidate.

Confessions - Prayer

Dr. King documents a passage from St. Augustine's autobiographical work regarding confessions and prayer.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, September 10, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait", which will appear in the Washington Afro-American. The advertisement has also been published in Ebony magazine.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Roy Wilkins, the chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urges Dr. King to attend a special meeting in Washington, D.C. to plan a course of action on pending civil rights legislation.

Letter from Wayne Blanks to MLK

New York (NY)

Wayne Blanks writes Dr. King in hopes that he will answer a question about the specific goals and standards he sets for Negroes in the US. Blanks is requesting this information for his advanced placement history assignment.

MLK's Speaker Bureau Contract

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
Rhode Island (RI)

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on October 5, 1966 at the University of Rhode Island.

Program for Mass Meeting with MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Dr. King spoke at the Scott High School Field House in Toledo. Mayor John W. Potter opened the program with an official welcome to the city and Rev. Robert Culp welcomed the prticipants on behalf of the Toledo Chapter of the NAACP. Rev. B. F. Wright, the President of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Toledo and Vicinity, gave the benediction.

Letter from Edna R. McKinnon to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967
California (CA)

Edna McKinnon praises Dr. King for his wonderful work with the SCLC and its effect on the "entire world." She agrees with Dr. King's nonviolent philosophy and approach to American military intervention in Vietnam. Ms. McKinnon is the sister of Jeanette Rankin, the first woman of Congress, and the only member to vote against U.S. entry into both world wars.