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SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

This is the SCLC's 1963 Spring Newsletter. Articles include: "The 22 Billion Dollar Giant" and "Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany."

Letter from Francis Stern to MLK

Friday, February 19, 1965

Francis H. Stern, Chairman of the Humanitarian Award Committee, writes Dr. King informing him that he has been selected unanimously to receive the 1964 Brith Sholom Humanitarian Award. Stern points out that past recipients include Eleanor Roosevelt, Thurgood Marshall, Rabbi Stephen Wise, UN secretary general Trygvie Lie, and former Prime Minister of Australia Herbert Evatt.

William E. Channing

Dr. King references theologian William E. Channing regarding his views on "Unitarian Christianity."

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

Letter from James Dodd to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963

James Dodd of the Sacramento NAACP invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker for their Life Membership Awards Banquet. The theme of the dinner is "The Man and the Times."

Revelation

Dr. King discusses the idea that Jesus Christ is the only direct form of revelation, which was proposed in Emil Brunner's "The Mediator."

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King alerts Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the brutal treatment against Negroes attempting register to vote in Greenville, Mississippi. He asks Kennedy to intervene in an effort to protect the lives of those individuals working for the right to vote.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, asks Dr. King if he can access his mailing list or circulate material that Clurman provides in an effort to end the famine in India.

Letter from Rhoda Dorsey to MLK

Thursday, May 21, 1964

Rhoda Dorsey, Dean and Associate Professor of History at Goucher College, informs Dr. King that they have included "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" on the freshman class reading list.

"Discerning the Signs of History"

Sunday, November 15, 1964

Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."

Letter of Support from Bishop W.M. Jones

Wednesday, September 4, 1963

Bishop W. M. Jones drafts this correspondence to Dr. King, offering prayers to him and his co-workers.

Letter from Stanley Singer to MLK

Sunday, August 5, 1962

Stanley Singer replies to Dr. King's article in the NY Times Magazine entitled, "The Case Against 'Tokenism'." Mr. Singer implies that the Negro race is inferior due to their immorality. He highlights the perceived negative attributes of the African American community by the inadequacies within their family structure. Mr. Singer expounds on nonviolent resistance, the Civil War, the U.S. constitution, and more.

Letter from Sidney M. Peck to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

On behalf of the University Circle Teach-In Committee, Western Reserve University Professor Sydney Peck invites Dr. King to speak about the Vietnam War at a conference on US foreign policy.

Mt. Zion Baptist Church Third Annual Lecture Series

Friday, November 10, 1961

The Mount Zion Baptist Church presents Dr. King as the key note speaker for their Third Annual Lecture Series. The lecture series will provide the community with a conscientious perspective of the societal issues as recognized by Dr. King. Furthermore, this event will bring aid to the Building Program of Mount Zion.

Letter from Postal Worker to MLK

An anonymous postal worker requests that Dr. King write a letter to the regional director of the Atlanta Post Office concerning discriminatory employment practices.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

SCLC Voter Registration Prospectus 1961

The SCLC Voter Registration Prospectus discusses the importance of the Negro vote. The SCLC believes that by voting, the Negro "can be heard and demand equal consideration." They believe that for a voter registration drive to be successful it must be church oriented. Thus, this prospectus outlines the programs and organizations needed for a church-oriented registration drive. Also included is a list of duties for the SCLC staff and a proposed budget for the drive.

Letter from Lynne Ansorge to MLK

Lynne Ansorge invites Dr. King to Lawrence College. He also tells Dr. King about the issues that have been occurring in their community.

Letter from Reverend Virgil W. Glanton to SCLC

Saturday, June 18, 1966

In this letter, Reverend Virgil Glanton gives a contribution to SCLC and offers support for the Meredith March.

Letter from Representative Thomas G. Morris to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

New Mexico Congressman Thomas Morris writes Dr. King to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram requesting Morris' opposition to House Bill 585, which would dismiss five recently elected members. Morris does not indicate his position in the matter.

Financial Breakdown on the Basis of Individual Contributions

Dr. King illustrates the financial breakdown of individual financial contributions over the course of a year, broken down by number of people and amount per person.

The Meaning of Hope

Dr. King delivered this sermon while pastoring Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In spite of the existence of racial injustice in America, Dr. King maintains hope for equality, and reminds the church of their responsibility to "keep the flame of hope burning."

Telegram from John Barber and Rev. L. C. Filer to MLK

John Barber, President of the New Haven Branch of the NAACP, sends his support to Dr. King while he serves time in Albany County Jail. Barber expresses sympathetic concern and promises to register financial support soon.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

The Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference On Africa sent this letter to update Dr. King and other committee members about plans for the third national biennial leadership conference.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Roy Wilkins, the chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urges Dr. King to attend a special meeting in Washington, D.C. to plan a course of action on pending civil rights legislation.

Telephone Log: January 22

This memo from the desk of Dr. King includes several missed telephone calls noted for his later response.

Letter from Ken Dyal to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to acknowledge receipt of a telegram and agree with his comments in reference to an enclosed supporting newspaper article.

Letter from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967

Teddy Kollek, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Israel, expresses appreciation and support for Dr. King's planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. At the time of this letter, West Jerusalem was Israeli territory and East Jerusalem part of Jordan. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

The Second Sunday After Easter

Sunday, April 28, 1968

The preacher begins by reminding the audience about various forms of evil, the church's mission to help humans obtain heavenly rights and other topics from the previous week's sermon. After recapping last Sunday's sermon, the preacher uses the Word of God to answer the question, "How should Christians react to the afflictions they suffer in the world?" The three answers to this question are broken up into three different sections and explained in depth by the speaker.

Man

Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.