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Royalty Earnings Statement

Detroit, MI

This royalty statement provides a listing of earnings from two records; "The Great March to Freedom" and "The Great March on Washington."

Letter From Joan Daves to Clarence B. Jones

Monday, May 18, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Clarence B. Jones about the carbon of the letter sent to Dr. King regarding an excerpt from "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Joseph W. Harb to MLK

Saturday, April 15, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Joseph W. Harb requests a copy of Dr. King's speech concerning the Vietnam War.

Letter from Gerhard Ruoff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA

Gerhard Ruoff inquires about Dr. King and his nonviolent philosophy. Ruoff desires to know how King will respond if violence faces him.

Political Cartoon: The FBI Adds

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This satirical cartoon in the Nashville Banner equates protests in the U.S. with the Communist buildup in Vietnam.

Letter to Miss Tower Regarding Dr. King's Book

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
Kentucky (KY)

In this brief note, Thomas Merton expresses gratitude to Ms. Tower for gifting him with Dr. King's new book. Merton, a contemplative monk, provides a statement possibly to appear as an endorsement of sorts and requests copies of the edition when it is made available.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gates

Wednesday, July 24, 1963
Missouri (MO), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gates for their donation to the SCLC. He also tells them that the SCLC supports the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund's "Committee of 100."

Religion

Dr. King quotes Robert Flint’s “The Philosophy of History.”

Montgomery Bus Protest Planning Agenda

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This outline documents information regarding the Montgomery Bus Protest.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. H. Libby

Friday, September 8, 1961
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald sends Mrs. Libby a copy of Dr. King's sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald could not retrieve a copy of the address preached at the Riverside Church that Mrs. Libby requested.

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, BRAZIL

L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King stating that the Methodist Church of Brazil is eager to have him as the Centennial speaker. McCoy believes that Dr. King can share his wisdom with Brazil leaders regarding the social conditions in America.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

Evil (The Problem of)

Dr. King records thoughts on the problem of evil with references to the British philosopher John Stuart Mill and Job.

Letter from Solomon and Dorothy Zeltzer to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
California (CA)

The Zeltzer family send warm regards and support to the King family.

Letter from MLK to Reverend W.E. Gardner

Wednesday, February 28, 1962
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of the First Baptist Church in Long Island, New York.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, December 20, 1966
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Vice President Humphrey extends a holiday greeting to Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from MLK to Bruce Smith

Tuesday, June 23, 1964
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King responds to Mr. Smith's earlier letter, in which Smith objected to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. King recommends his book, "Why We Can't Wait" to Smith and offers his response to Smith's argument against the bill.

Proposal for Preventing Denial of the Right to Vote

Thursday, October 29, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC)

William L. Higgs proposes that the Democratic Caucus in the US Senate adopt a resolution that no Democratic Senator shall become chairman of a Senate Standing Committee if his seat was won in an election where there was substantial denial of the right to vote based on race. In Mississippi only 6% of eligible Negroes are registered to vote, yet US Senator James Eastland chairs the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee that considers legislation regarding the right to vote and also the appointment of judges charged with enforcing those laws.

Letter from Joan Daves to Mrs. Dora McDonald about expenses from trip to New York

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. and Mrs. King extended their stay in New York City to launch his latest book. Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting lodging receipts in an effort to expedite the expense reporting process with Harper Publishing. Handwritten notes on the document suggest that the launch was very successful.

Letter from L. Serron to MLK

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

L. Serron writes to Dr. King requesting materials on the Selma Demonstration and the March on Montgomery for class usage.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Monday, September 9, 1963
Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Letter from J. V. Jones to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM

J.V. Jones questions whether Dr. King's position on the Vietnam war is helping the black race because he believes otherwise. Jones also encloses a Walter Winchell article from the Los Angeles Harold Examiner.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
Boston, MA, St. Augustine, FL, New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Florida (FL)

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

God (His Omnipotence)

Dr. King defines omnipotence as meaning that God has the power to carry out His will. He notes that God must hold characteristics of both good and evil and states that few philosophers have acknowledged God's omnipotence.

Letter from Harley Lappin to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Public Affairs Committee of Winters College at York University in Ontario invites Dr. King to participate in a discussion to raise student awareness of current political issues.

Statement by Albert Raby Responding to Attack on MLK by Ernest Rather

Albert Raby responds to questions by Ernest Rather about Dr. King's statistics related to Negro housing conditions. He explains that Dr. King's facts were taken from the 1960 census, which he contrasts with statistics from the Department of Urban Renewal.

Letter from Leon Despres to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Leon M. Despres, Alderman of the Fifth Ward of Chicago, welcomes Dr. King to the city. Despres expresses his appreciation for King's visit and encourages as much help as possible to help rid Chicago of their current system of segregation.

Cyprian of Carthage

Dr. King briefly outlines the life of Saint Cyprian of Carthage.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.