Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Michigan (MI)"

Letter from MLK to Michelle Feinberg

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King responds to Michelle Feinberg, a special education student from Gary, Indiana. In the letter, Dr. King tells Michelle her letter meant a lot to him and she is fortunate to have a special teacher.

Letter from Cummins E. Speakman to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

Dr. Speakman requests that Dr. King recommends the Maunaolu College of Maui to any individuals interested in coming to Hawaii.

Letter From Bessie G. White to MLK

Bessie G. White writes to Dr. King, highlighting the strife that she feels Dr. King will continue to go through while fighting for civil rights in the south.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alan B. Campbell

Tuesday, August 13, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to Alan B. Campbell's recent letter to Dr. King in which he requested a copy of the sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald informs Campbell that that sermon has not been published on its own, but Dr. King recently published the book "Strength to Love," which contains that sermon among many others.

Letter from Sanford Kahn to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966

Sanford Kahn requests Dr. King's support for an effort to abolish the death penalty at the federal level. If given Dr. King's support, Kahn proposes listing the SCLC as a participating member of the ad hoc committee. If the SCLC cannot be listed, Kahn suggests Dr. King serve as an advisor.

Thirty-nine Articles

Dr. King writes notes regarding the "basic doctrinal formula of the Anglican Church."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Harry Crosby to MLK

Sunday, March 8, 1964

The Crosby family of Massachusetts encloses a check to Dr. King to aid in the fight for equality. Mrs. Crosby notes that her husband was the first individual to employ a Negro teacher at Boston University, where Dr. King received his PhD in systematic theology.

Letter from Marion Arnold to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Marion Arnold, chairman of the Ecumenical Mission Committee of Broadway United Church of Christ, expresses thanks for the copy of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Statement by Linda Dannenbreg

In this statement, Linda Danneberg protests the war in Vietnam by discussing the formation of the Student Mobilization Committee. She also expounds on the organization's upcoming national conference in Chicago, Illinois.

North and South: SCLC Staff News January, 1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

The January, 1967 edition of SCLC's staff newsletter shares Christmas and New Year stories from the staff members and their families. The newsletter also reports on recent activities of the organization such as a Chicago boycott, Junius Griffin's move to the Republican National Committee, a political rally, the SCLC's housing project in Chicago, a recent conference on Negro history, the situation in Grenada, Mississippi and other news items.

Letter from W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965

W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. writes the SCLC enclosing a check from various church groups to be used toward Selma expenses.

MLK on Communist Infiltration

Dr. King responds to an article written by Joseph Alsop and J. Edgar Hoover that charged communism had infiltrated the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. S.C. Njonjo

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

Dora McDonald responds to Mr. Njonjo's invitation for Dr. King to attend Kenya's Independence Celebration. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Njonjo that Dr. King is happy to accept the invitation.

Telegram from Trinity Cathedral to MLK

Friday, May 24, 1963

Members of Trinity Cathedral in Newark, New Jersey offer their support to Dr. King and others "who are endangering your lives for the sake of others." Dr. King received this telegram in the midst of the desegregation campaign in Birmingham, 1963.

MLK - Justice Without Violence

Wednesday, April 3, 1957

Dr. King gave this 1957 address to the Institute of Adult Education at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Letter from MLK to Coretta Scott King

Saturday, October 1, 1960

In an intimate letter to Mrs. King, Dr. King informs her of his recent arrival to the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He urges her "to be strong in faith" as she is also pregnant with their third child at the time. He expresses his hope for a family visit that coming Sunday, and his desire to remain intellectually engaged during his four-month sentence.

Letter from SNCC Chairman John Lewis to William Shawn

Thursday, April 22, 1965

John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, responds to a recent article in "The New Yorker." He provides a number of corrections to the article and also explains who should be considered official spokespersons for SNCC.

Letter from Bob Abel to MLK

In this letter Bob Abel encloses a contribution from a friend in England to Dr. King while also commenting on Vietnam and the link to Civil Rights.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Letter from Stanley Slota to MLK

Stanley Slota writes Dr. King to acknowledge how proud he is of him and expresses his desire for more people to give back to the poor.

Western Union Telegram from Albert Shanker to MLK

Mr. Shanker, President United Federation of Teachers AFL-CIO, thanks Dr. King for his support during a teachers' strike.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Chicago Staff

Wednesday, January 10, 1968

Tom Offenburger writes to the SCLC Chicago Office Staff Steering Committee concerning phone call procedures. Offenburger asserts that answering the phone with "Operation Breadbasket" will not reveal the broader interest of the SCLC, and suggests answering the phone with, "good morning, SCLC."

Letter from Delight S. Gordon to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

Ms. Gordon urges Dr. King to use his influence as a great leader to persuade Negros not to condone the actions of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Napoleon Appleby to MLK

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Napoleon Appleby offers praise and prayers to Dr. King.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, July 29, 1965

SCLC Vice President-At-Large, Ralph D. Abernathy, grants permission for the release of information to Jesse B. Blayton. Mr. Blayton was Georgia's first black Certified Public Accountant.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador and Madam J. Graham Parsons

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Ambassador and Madam J. Graham Parsons for the reception and their hospitality during Dr. King's visit to Sweden.

Letter from Anna Mull Jones to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Anna M. Jones informs Dr. King that she will pray for him while he is in jail, but she also requests that he read the history of the United States and reread the Constitution. She asserts that the Republican Party was created for the express purpose of halting the spread of slavery.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Letter from Lessie Robinson to MLK Regarding Segregation

Mrs. Robinson informs Dr. King of the difficulty in finding a good job in segregated Graceville, FL.