Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Michigan (MI)"

Chicago Defender: My Dream

Saturday, February 19, 1966

Dr. King writes this article for the Chicago Defender describing the social and economic climate of Chicago's ghettos. He explains that Ghettos are the site of economic exploitation and where no exchange of culture and resources are allowed to exist. SCLC staff and Reverend James Bevel "have come to see this as a system of internal colonialism." It is understood that slum culture is designed to perpetuate the inferior educational, health, housing, and employment states of the Negro.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

We Salute You!

Thirteen members of Ebenezer Baptist Church are praised for their years of service and role in making the church monumental.

The Citizenship Education Program

This newsletter serves as a platform for the Citizenship Education Program. The program is designed to help inform African Americans of their rights as citizens in the United States.

Immortality

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the topic of immorality.

Letter to Jesse Jackson from Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 30, 1966

Dr. King request the attendance of Rev. Jesse Jackson at a meeting that will discuss the distribution of grant funds for a program regarding nonviolence and social change.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes St. Irenaeus of Lyons.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Letter from John G. Hodgson to MLK

Thursday, August 4, 1966

John G. Hudson requests that Dr. King use Hodgson Travel Service for an upcoming trip to the Holy Land.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

The Urban Coalition's National Coordinators Weekly Report

Friday, December 8, 1967

This document contains The Urban Coalition's national coordinators weekly report. The report consists of a schedule of activities, a list of the Task Force on Educational Disparities members, and a list of the Task Force on Housing, Reconstruction, and Investment members.

Note - Leewellyn Daniel

The note, shown here, was written by Leewellyn Daniel, of Chicago, Illinois. The handwriting simply states, "Legal action concerning being arrested." However, the addressee of this note and the date it was written is unknown.

Letter from August Schou to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

August Schou, the Director of the Nobel Committee, sends Dr. King more information regarding the 1964 Peace Prize Award Ceremony. Logistics such as the time, location and instructions for his speech are described in this letter.

Negro Leaders' Mistakes Hurting Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In this article, David Lawrence explains his dissatisfaction with "Negro leaders" for supporting the actions of Adam Clayton Powell, who in Lawrence's mind, has abused his office and trust.

Letter from Constance Webb to MLK and Joan Daves

Thursday, March 2, 1967

In this letter, Constance Webb asks Dr. King to share more details about the comments Richard Wright made about "perhaps there was more behind the incident then simply a "mad" woman.", referring to the lady who stabbed Dr. King.

Invitation from the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta Dinner Meeting

Monday, January 8, 1968

On behalf of the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Chairman Mrs. John W. Stanley extends an invitation to an upcoming dinner meeting where Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Executive Director of the Community Relations Commission of the City of Atlanta, will be honored. Morehouse College President Emeritus Dr. Benjamin E. Mays is scheduled to discuss "Black Power versus White Power" with the attendees.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

MLK Request from Princeton Committee for Negotiation Now

Friday, November 10, 1967

Mary Temple of the Princeton Committee for Negotiation, invites Dr. King to make an appearance at a fundraising event.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Suffering

Dr. King notes his thoughts on the question of the Biblical prophet Habakkuk: "why do the wicked prosper?"

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Letter from Joan Daves to Andrew Young

Friday, April 21, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Daves focuses on Dr. King's speeches and discusses copyrighting issues.

Letter from Charley Brown to MLK about Wallace Administration

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

In this letter Charley Brown suggests to Dr. King the idea of endorsing Mrs. Wallace for governor of Alabama, arguing that this would actually lose Mr. Wallace a number of votes.

MLK Address to a North Carolina Branch of the NAACP

Sunday, September 25, 1960

Dr. King addresses a public meeting of Charlotte, North Carolina's NAACP branch. He lists five actions the Negro can do to assist America with realizing the dream. The Negro must challenge the system of segregation, make efforts to gain ballots, and sacrifice to achieve freedom.

Letter from the Northern Illinois Ministerial Association of the Church of God to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

Rev. Curtis Barge, Rev. Claude Wyatt and Rev. Willie Barrow send Dr. King two checks as a contribution to the civil rights struggle. One check is for the SCLC and the other is for the Dallas County Voters League.

SCLC Newsletter: March-April 1966

This is an example of one of many SCLC Newsletters printed for public distribution. In this third volume, topics include: Bloody Sunday, Dr. King Thanks Sweden, Man with a Plan, Abernathy Tells Hawaii of Brotherhood, and several others.

Letter from Carl E. Farris to William Rutherford

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Mr. Farris strongly rejects Mr. Rutherford's offered position to answer Dr. King's mail and to act as Deputy Director of CEP at board meetings.

Postcard from Timothy WU to Dr. King

Monday, February 26, 1968

Timothy Wu requests information regarding evangelism and Dr. King's programs.

Letter from the Pacifist Crusade "John XXIII" to MLK

Sunday, April 11, 1965

Members of the Pacifist Crusade of Argentina extend support to Dr. King in his quest for peace. The group explains the background of the organization and express their goal of world peace through reconciliation.