Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Michigan (MI)"

Telegram from Ambassador Ade Martins to MLK

This telegram was sent to Dr. King and Theodore Brown by N. Ade Martins, the Ambassador of Nigeria. He explains the reaction of Lt. Col. Yakubu Gowon, the commander in chief of the armed forces, to Dr. King's letter concerning the violence in Nigeria.

Letter to SCLC from Lisa Goldiamond about Volunteer Service

Monday, April 15, 1968

Goldiamond, a student at Royal Victoria College, requests that the SCLC. Putting words to action, she offers to keep Dr. King's work alive by volunteering in local civil rights organizations over summer break.

Letter from Alfredo Gomez Gil to MLK

Sheila M. Rogers writes Dr. King in place of her friend Alfredo Gil, who has written a poem in Spanish about the plight of blacks. Rogers has translated the poem and sent it to Dr. King in support of the work he is doing for blacks in the United States.

Letter from Jill Chisholm to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Ms. Chisholm, from South Africa, informs Dr. King of her temporary stay in the United States to research the non-violent movement and work of SCLC. She request to meet with Dr. King to discuss his work in Atlanta, GA and Chicago, IL.

Letter from George A. Wiley to Rev. Andrew Young

Monday, March 25, 1968

George A. Wiley writes Reverend Andrew Young and other staff of the SCLC regarding National Welfare Rights Organization's (NWRO) participation with the Poor People's Campaign.

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

Eisenhower - Views on the Racial Question

Dr. King notes General Dwight D. Eisenhower's justification of racial segregation during Eisenhower's 1948 testimony before a Senate subcommittee.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Samuel Evans

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dora McDonald writes to Samuel L. Evans, of Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee, on behalf of Rev. Andrew Young regarding Dr. King's appearance in Philadelphia.

Letter from Marc de Jesus to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Marc de Jesus writes to Mrs. King following Dr. King's assassination.

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Letter from Alfonzo Henderson to Afro-Americans

This letter from ARIDO (Afro-American Resource Industrial Development Organization) president Alfonzo Henderson outlines the organization's program goals.

DeWolf L. Harold: RRR (1949)

Dr. King references Harold DeWolf's book "The Religious Revolt Against Reason."

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Knowledge)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Appeal to Billy Graham Regarding Religion

Matakichi Saito questions Billy Graham about his views on religion as it relates to discrimination.

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Letter from Rosa Lockett Reodus to MLK

Sunday, January 30, 1966

Reodus invites Dr. King to speak at the Progressive Community Church in Chicago and offers a small donation from the church in support of his cause.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Letter from A. Bohdan to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

A. Bohdan, catering manager of Sydney, Australia's Chevron Hotel, writes Dr. King in request of his favorite meal to include on a special menu featuring dishes of other "famous personalities in Politics, Industry, and Art."

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Jeremiah 3:12.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Friday, May 12, 1967

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Letter from W. Daniels to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

W. Daniels corresponds to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak in Montreal at the Grand Master's Banquet on August 13, 1968.

Ritschl

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl on Christology regarding Jesus' relation to God.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

Telegram from MLK to Ralph McGill Regarding Bereavement

Thursday, March 22, 1962

In this telegram to Ralph McGill, Dr. King expresses his sympathy for the passing of his wife.

Royalty Statement for French Edition of The Strength to Love

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the French edition of Dr. King's "The Strength to Love," published by Casterman S.A. for the period October 1, 1965 to March 31, 1966.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1963

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, informs Dr. King that his department is inquiring into events in Greenwood, Mississippi that Dr. King brought to his attention. He assures Dr. King that the Justice Department will take appropriate action with respect to any violations of federal law.

Library Book Due Date Card

This document is a ledger that contains a due date for an over night loan.