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Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

Letter from Terrie to MLK

Saturday, March 2, 1968

The author informs Dr. King of her
inability to continue working for the SCLC due to conflicting personal issues and emotional instability. She asserts that the work of the SCLC is too important for her to remain "jumping around in the organization." She also informs Dr. King that the SCLC is family and that she is only leaving for personal reasons. Lastly, she requests that other primary members of the organization are informed of this departure.

Letter from MLK to Laura Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King thanks Laura Graves for her recent letter which presented suggestions and advice regarding the prejudice in the American community. King states, "with persons of good will increasingly speaking on behalf of racial injustice, the day will arrive more quickly."

Adverse Letter from Mrs. Arthur Kornoelje to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Mrs. Kornoelje expresses her loss of faith in Dr. King. Kornoelje objects to the negro race as a whole, and feels that 90% of crimes in Grand Rapids are committed by negroes.

Interview of MLK to Appear in PLAYBOY

Thursday, January 11, 1968

On behalf of Dr. King, Secretary Dora McDonald responds to Thomas A. Johnson of The New York Times. She goes on to say that Dr. King accepts the invitation for an interview, that would appear in an upcoming issue of PLAYBOY Magazine.

A Program for the Public Meeting at Metropolitan Baptist Church

Thursday, September 27, 1962

This program outlines a two-day Public Meeting sponsored by the SCLC at Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King was scheduled to deliver the key address.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

This letter serves to inform Dr.King of the offers being made from a Japanese publisher, to purchase the rights to "Strength to Love."

Telegram from Charles Evers to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

This telegram, from board members of MAP, expresses their dissatisfaction with Dr. King's comments regarding refunding efforts of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

What Is a Cause

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Principles of Natural Knowledge."

Social Ethics

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 3:15 while taking notes about social ethics. The passage that he quotes says that those who oppress others are sinning against God.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E.Mays to William J. Trent, Jr.

Friday, January 31, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays is notifying William Trent that Dr. King will meet with John D. Rockefellar, III at his office on Feburary 6. What the meeting is about is not specified in the letter.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller to Wyatt Walker

Monday, June 22, 1964

This telegram is part of a correspondence chain with famous New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller. Rockefeller informs Wyatt Tee Walker that a schedule conflict prohibits his attendance at the Dedication of New Churches in Albany.

Letter from Henry N. Flynt, Jr. to MLK

Sunday, October 15, 1967

Henry N. Flynt expresses his appreciation for a copy of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here" and compliments Dr. King on the quality of the book.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Draft Letter from MLK to Reverend Jackson

Dr. King replies to Rev. Jackson's letter of April 22. He apologizes for the delay and assures Rev. Jackson that he will send thank you messages to everyone listed in his initial letter. Dr. King also tells Rev. Jackson that he hopes their friendship has not been affected by recent circumstances.

Letter from Mary Eunice to MLK

Saturday, June 13, 1964

Mary Eunice writes Dr. King offering her appreciation for the program he held in San Diego, California. Ms. Eunice notifies Dr. King that she will send him pictures from the program.

Holiday Card from the McKinneys

Reverend S. Berry McKinney, his wife and daughter sent Dr. King this holiday card.

Invitation from Susan Rowland to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Susan Rowland invites Dr. King to the University of Western Ontario to give an address during the spring of 1968. During his visit he is expected to speak on the topics of civil rights and the Vietnam conflict. Although these are the areas of focus, Ms. Rowland explains that the exact nature of the talk is up to Dr. King's discretion.

Letter from the Morrissetts to MLK and Mrs. King

Sunday, November 30, 1958

Elizabeth Morrissett wishes the King family a Merry Christmas. Mrs. Morrisset also invites Dr. King to come speak at a Purdue University Convocation.

Correspondence: Letter from Joan Daves to MLK- October 14, 1963

Monday, October 14, 1963

Here Mr. Daves advises Dr. King to accept an offer presented to him for the Dutch rights of his novel "Strength to Love" then references two copies of the proposed contractual agreement.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Horace Bushnell"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

National Committee to Combat Nazism's Resolution on Civil Rights

Sunday, May 28, 1967

The National Committee to Combat Nazism passed this resolution, affirming the Civil Rights Movement and agreeing to send Dr. King and President Johnson a copy of their stance.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ozell Sutton

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Sutton's request for seventy-five copies of Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail." She regretfully informs the sender that their office is out of re-prints; however she suggests that he obtain copies of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in which the Letter from the Birmingham Jail is printed.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce of Time Magazine

Thursday, January 16, 1964

Dr. King thanks Henry Luce of Time magazine for naming him "Man of the Year." However, Dr. King believes that this honor is shared among the millions of individuals who committed themselves to the struggle for civil rights. Dr. King also acknowledges Luce for publishing the accomplishments of Negro professionals.

Letter from Andrew Young to Harry Belafonte

Monday, February 28, 1966

Andrew J. Young writes Harry Belafonte applauding him on his television show "The Strolling Twenties." Unlike average shows, Belafonte delivers "high calibre performances" with the ability to articulate the realities of the American Negro. Young further expresses hope that the 1966 Freedom Festival in Chicago has a similar effect.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addressed multiple issues that they had a misunderstanding about. He then tells Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions. Lastly, he informs Attorney General Cook that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Radio Sermon Titles and Dates

In this document Dr. King lists a series of radio sermon titles and their respective dates of delivery.