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"Milwaukee, WI"

Letter from Mrs. Bonnie Cohen to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Bonnie Cohen, a senior at Eastern Michigan University, writes to Rev. Abernathy requesting his thoughts on the problem of "crime in the streets."

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

How 700 Ibos were Killed by Mistake

Sunday, January 21, 1968

This article reports on the massacre of 700 Ibos by federal troops in the Ibo town of Asaba, Nigeria.

Pantheism

Dr. King writes about an unknown author's view of pantheism.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to David Mays

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora E. McDonald responds to David Mays of Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee. As requested, she encloses a copy of a speech Dr. King gave in Washington. Ms. McDonald also informs that a recording of the speech is available for purchase from the Council for United Civil Rights Leadership.

The Blame in Birmingham

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

Love of God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah referencing God's goal to redeem all mankind.

Handwriiten Notecard Regarding Freedom

This notecard written by Dr. Martin Luther King, cites a quote, of Tillich, regarding freedom.

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Letter from Robert Nelson to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965

Robert R. Nelson notifies Dr. King of the recent invitation that was first extended by Mr. Wendell English on behalf of the Impact Committee at Marshall University. Mr. Nelson requests Dr. King to participate as a key note speaker at one of the events. Impact is a morality driven organization focused on the proper guidance and purpose of life.

The Kingdom

Dr. King references New Testament passages related to The Kingdom.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Foreward by MLK: Famous Negro American Series

Dr. King discusses the contributions of Negro Americans to American society, past and present, in this foreward for the publication: Famous Negro American Series.

The Black Rose: Ruth Reese

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Ruth Reese, also known as "The Black Rose," thanks Dr. King for his support. This document includes a detailed biography of the vocalist, as well as, critic responses on her performances.

Fascism

Dr. King paraphrases one of Benito Mussolini's thoughts on fascism in "The Political and Social Doctrine of Fascism.

Sin

Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

This contract outlines the details of a speaking engagement for Dr. King on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin, Marathon County Center.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles H. Smith

Tuesday, January 30, 1962

Dr. King regrettably informs Rev. Charles Smith that he will not be unable to make an appearance at the First Baptist Church in West Virginia. Due to Dr. King's schedule and commitments to his home church, he finds it difficult to accept any invitations for the next several months.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

Letter from MLK to Birch Bayh

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Birch Bayh's support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition, Dr. King prays for Mr. Bayh's recovery from his recent accident.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Dr. King writes Mrs. Dilday of Riverside Baptist Church to express his appreciation for her two contributions to the SCLC. He explains the current works of the SCLC in Chicago and Alabama and stresses the importance of supporters like her.

Memorandum Regarding Fund Raising and Sale of Memorial Objects

Wednesday, May 8, 1968

William A. Rutherford alerts SCLC members that Dr. King's name is being used in various parts of the country to obtain a profit. These individuals have used the organization's name as well as that of the Poor Peoples Campaign. These actions are unlawful and have not been certified by SCLC's headquarters.

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

Letter From Walter J. Benedict to MLK

Sunday, October 29, 1967

Mr. Walter Benedict writes to Dr. King expressing his sympathy for King's incarceration in Birmingham. Benedict plans to show support by fasting and praying during the several days King is in jail.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Letter from A. Dolezalek to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

A. Dolezaler, director of a German library, requests a copy of a poster published by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He would like to add the poster to a collection about social, political movements.

Letter to MLK from Ms. Eleanor Fischer

Monday, November 13, 1961

Ms. Fischer writes to confirm a conference meeting, for an interview with Dr. King. She requests his presence at an informal dinner to discuss details about the program, for which his interview will be taped. Finally, she concludes by extending formalities to Dr. King's family and conveys her interests in interviewing them as well.