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The Christian Way of Life in Human Relations

Wednesday, December 4, 1957

Dr. King makes a speech to the National Council of Churches regarding the issue of American race relations. After school integration ... has noticed a radical change in the attitudes of African-Americans, ultimately giving birth to this mental and figurative notion of the "new Negro". He solicits the assistance and leadership of the nation's churches to take a firm stand against the rampant inequalities afflicting blacks are facing in America.

Letter from Peter S. Shults to NAACP

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Peter Shults writes the NAACP requesting a comment on a postcard he received that depicts Dr. King as a communist. He asks multiple questions regarding the validity of the picture on the postcard.

Robert F. Thorne's Response to the SCLC

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Robert F. Thorne expresses his commitment to the civil rights cause, but will discontinue his financial contributions to the SCLC due to Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Note to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964

In a brief note, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of an enclosed British publisher's catalogue for his review.

Letter from James H. Duckrey to MLK

Wednesday, March 11, 1964

James H. Duckrey, President of Cheyney State College, writes Dr. King asking him to serve as the Commencement Speaker. He briefly discusses the history of the college and informs Dr. King of the Honorarium.

Letter from James H. Meredith to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

James Meredith writes from Nigeria to congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Noble Peace Prize and emphasizes that the struggle for human rights is a world-wide struggle. Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the University of Mississippi, was at that time a post-graduate researcher in Nigeria.

Suffering

Dr. King notes that Deuteronomy 8:3 suggests that the purpose of suffering is to teach higher spiritual truths.

An Evening of Music

Sunday, April 15, 1962

The English family provides Ebenezer Baptist Church with "An Evening of Music" in the spring of 1962.

Letter from Augusta Hill to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965

Augusta Hill, president of the newly formed Negro American Labor Council, requests that Dr. King visit Racine, Wisconsin in an effort to help address the employment discrimination occurring there.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, February 10, 1964

Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, contacts Dr. King again about speaking at the organization's annual meeting. She informs Dr. King that she needs a response soon in order to put the information in the newspaper.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965

Dr. Mays informs Dr. King of his recommendation to confer an honorary degree from Morehouse College on Dr. J. Curtis Dixon. Mays includes a biographical sketch of Dr. Dixon and asks Dr. King to respond to the letter with his approval or disapproval.

Happiness

Dr. King outlines insight from philosophers Spinoza and Nietzsche regarding the concept of happiness.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes G. W. Knox on religion from the Harvard Theological Review.

Letter from Joan Sinkler to MLK

Joan Sinkler writes Dr. King expressing that she is disappointed with him for not mentioning "the racist and colonialist character" of the Vietnam War. Sinkler asserts that the US did not go to war to protect Hungary, Cuba or Tibet.

In a Word- Now

This is a draft of the article "In a Word-Now" written by Dr. King. It was published in the New York Times on September 29, 1963.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Memorandum from Lillie Hunter to MLK

Lillie Hunter sends Dr. King a memorandum that breaks down the office conditions and decorum as well as recommendations for the SCLC.

Letter from Letitia Baldrige to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963

Letitia Baldridge, Social Secretary for the White House, informs Dr. and Mrs. King of changes related to a reception with President Kennedy.

Letter from Dean George W. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, October 19, 1965

George Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of his brother-in-law, Captain Yancey Martin, who is subject to a trial based on previous accusations. Jones hopes that Dr. King is able to utilize his role with the S.C.L.C. to assist Captain Martin.

Letter of Support to MLK While In Jail

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Silas Townsend wrote this letter to Dr. King upon his jailing in Birmingham in 1967. Townsend writes how appropriate it is that Dr. King is jailed on All Saints Day.

Letter from Marian Hargrave to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963

Ms. Hargrave offers her support for Dr. King and his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. She also discusses the religious aspects of the struggle, which she feels give it a deeper meaning.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King talks about Montgomery, Alabama and the accomplishments that they have made toward civil rights.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

"A Constructive Use of the Sense of Shame" is the title of this sermon outline, prepared by Dr. King. The parable of the 'Prodigal Son' is the chosen text for the sermon.

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

Saturday, February 18, 1967

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

Monotheism

Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."

Extreme Unction

Dr. King defines extreme unction from the perspective of the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthadox church.

Letter from Dan C. Lortie to MLK

Monday, May 23, 1966

Professor Dan Lortie of the University of Chicago invites Dr. King to speak at the Colver-Rosenberger Lecture Series.

The Story of Snick

Sunday, September 25, 1966

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Robert Flint’s “The Philosophy of History.”

Letter from Dixie to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966

Dixie, a white man and segregationist, states in his letter to Dr. King that it has taken the Whites only a few weeks to get segregation rolling again.