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"Minnesota (MN)"

Letter from Mrs. Emma Hines to MLK

Mrs. Emma Hines offers her moral and financial support to Dr. King. As a 78 year old woman, she will not be able to join King in his march, however, states that she has some young people that might be joining.

Angels

Dr. King mentions the concept of patron angels that appears in Daniel 10:13, 20, and 21.

Letter from MLK to John Conyers

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Congressman John Conyers' visit to Selma, Alabama. Dr. King requests Congressman Conyers' support for passing federal legislation that will eliminate the barriers to a free voting process for African American citizens.

Letter from Terry J. Fox to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

This letter, was written to Dr. King from Terry J. Fox. Terry J. Fox is the President of Iroquois Industries Inc. In this letter he attaches to Dr. King a copy of his company brochure.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 20, 1956

As the President of Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King elaborates on the past twelve months and the city's efforts to fight against racial injustice through the bus boycott. Their journey concluded victoriously with the acknowledgment of the Supreme Court that invalidated segregated transportation. Dr. King informs the Montgomery community that they are to "return to the buses" on a "non-segregated basis."

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

In a statement to the Democratic National Convention, the authors of this document proclaim that they are seeking freedom. They say that immediate change will only come if the elected Chief Executive is committed to giving life to the Constitution. In an attempt to achieve this, they request that all of the Presidential nominees meet the people's delegation.

SCLC Newsletter: November-December 1963

Friday, November 1, 1963

Dr. King writes about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and how it affected the citizens of the United States. King asserts that Kennedy handled international and national issues "with a depth of concern, a breadth of intelligence, and a keen sense of history." Dr. King says that while the question of who killed Kennedy is important, one should ask "what killed him" instead.

Appreciation Letter from MLK to Maitland Griggs

Thursday, January 10, 1963

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Maitland Griggs contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Professor A. Clement to MLK Regarding the Peace Movement

Monday, May 15, 1967

A. Clement, Professor of Foreign Languages at Los Angeles City College, drafted this letter to Dr. King supporting his peace efforts against the Vietnam War. Enclosing 100 dollars, Clement further suggests that King reaches out to churches and synagogues across America to collect a special offering for the cause.

Telegram from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman Guyot to MLK

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman expresses concern regarding the SCLC's exclusion of "indigenous people of various political orientation in preparing the program" for the annual convention held in Jackson, MS.

Letter to MLK from Mrs. Mary Jane Chattams

Friday, November 17, 1967

Mrs. Chattams, a student, has contacted Dr. King for further clarity regarding a sermon he reportedly delivered in a Communist Church. Sharing Dr. King’s comments will be informative and beneficial for future class discussions.

Advertising and Promotion Expenditures

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

This is a copy of the advertising and promotion expenditures for Dr. King's book, "Strength To Love".

Pride

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on social ethics from the Book of Nahum.

Knudson

Dr. King cites a publication by theologian Albert Knudson.

Letter from Mrs. Elsie Walker to the SCLF

Monday, April 15, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Elsie Walker mentions the enclosure of $50 given in memory of Dr. King. She also commits her Church's Service Guild to making annual pilgrimages to Dr. King's burial site in order to pay homage to "our Leader."

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Letter from Wiley Bell to MLK

Friday, June 28, 1963

Inspired by Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail," Wiley Bell thanks Dr. King for the "heart warming and heart rending article." Bell tells Dr. King that his letter has inspired his studies as a fellow clergyman.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Letter from Robert L. Pino to MLK

Monday, August 13, 1962

Mr. Pino, Chairman of the Local Union 2603 Civil Rights Committee of Lackawanna, New York, praises Dr. King's efforts in Albany, Georgia.

Draft Speech for Atlanta Nobel Peace Prize Reception

Dr. King drafts a speech that he will make in Atlanta for the reception honoring his Nobel Peace Prize winning. In the speech he offers his gratitude to friends and family who supported him in his efforts. Dr. King also briefly discusses the issue of racial injustice and the continued fight for equality.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Phillip O. Foss Seeks Permission to Use "Letter from Birmingham Jail"

Sunday, February 12, 1967

Philip O. Foss writes to Dr. King in hopes of receiving permission to use excerpts from the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in his new text book.

Remember Who You Are!

Thursday, December 6, 1956

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall informs Dr. King that the Department of Justice is investigating the assault upon Reverend Paul Chapman.

Revised School Desegregation Policies Under Civil Rights Act of 1964

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This document, published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, gives revised policies for school desegregation. The list of areas covered includes unequal programs and facilities, desegregation of staff and dismissals.

Justice Versus Injustice

Dr. King explains that the power that establishes justice also generates injustice. He also references an ancient Egyptian story "The Eloquent Peasant" and James Henry Breasted's "The Dawn of Conscience."