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"Minnesota (MN)"

Letter from Alfonzo Henderson to Afro-Americans

Detroit, MI, New York (NY), New York, NY, Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This letter from ARIDO (Afro-American Resource Industrial Development Organization) president Alfonzo Henderson outlines the organization's program goals.

Letter from Concerned Citizen to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
California (CA)

A citizen writes Dr. King to express their disagreement and distaste for his work within the Civil Rights Movement. The citizen believes that Dr. King's work promotes more hatred and violence in the nation.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This document is a letter from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. in regards to New York Times Magazine's request to reprint Dr. King's publication: "Where We Are Going". April 26, 1967

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New York, NY

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Wednesday, July 8, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

In this letter Senator Hubert Humphrey urges Dr. King to accept an invitation to speak at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.

Letter from MLK to The Farmington Ministerial Association

Monday, January 30, 1967
Michigan (MI)

This letter, dated January 30, 1967, was sent from Dr. King to the Farming Ministerial Association. In this letter, he thanks them for their contribution and apologizes for responding late. Their letter was accidentally placed in a folder entitled "Letters to be filed". He further goes on to state how he wishes they, along with other loyal contributors could know more directly how important their support is to the SCLC and all that it stands for.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick

Monday, May 17, 1965
New York, NY, PUERTO RICO

Andrew Young instructs Dora McDonald to respond to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick's invitation to Dr. King. Ms. McDonald affirms Dr. King's arrival date and informs Mr. Kirkpatrick that they must accommodate the cost expense for two. She asserts that it is necessary for Dr. King to travel with at least one of his aides.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes St. Irenaeus of Lyons.

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Georgia (GA)

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966
CANADA

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses royalties for Dr. King's "Why We Can?t Wait," and "Strength to Love."

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), West Virginia (WV), Birmingham, AL, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Boston, MA

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

Letter from the Frink Family to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL)

Father and husband John Frink, sends a $200 donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was made possible by not getting anyone any Christmas gifts. The author writes of a future intent to contribute physical aid to the organization in their hometown of Florida. In closing, Frink requests information regarding sponsorship of a needy family for the purpose of teaching his children how to be of service to others.

Letter from Mrs. William Henry Slakey to MLK

California (CA)

Mrs. Slakey writes Dr. King to commend his letter denouncing the term "Black Power." In the post script, she requests a personal response instead of a form letter.

Letter to Dorothy Height from Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald apologizes to Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, for not responding sooner to let her know that Dr. and Mrs. King would be unable to attend the Premier Life Membership Dinner. The invitation to the dinner came during Dr. King's sabbatical to write a new book.

Carbon Copy Letter from Dr. King to Joan Daves Regarding rights of "Strength To Love"

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Dr. King acknowledges that he is in receipt of Joan Daves letter about the schedule on June 8, as well as, the letter concerning the offer for the Japanese rights of "Strength To Love".

SCLC News Bulletin

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, ISRAEL, Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Lowndes County, AL

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

Correspondence: Letter from Joan Daves to MLK- October 14, 1963

Monday, October 14, 1963
New York, NY

Here Mr. Daves advises Dr. King to accept an offer presented to him for the Dutch rights of his novel "Strength to Love" then references two copies of the proposed contractual agreement.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

JAPAN, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Letter to MLK from the Peace Research Institute

Saturday, November 28, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Peace Research Institute of Oslo congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and further expresses their interest of having Dr. King speak at a seminar on nonviolence. The institute is starting a research project on nonviolence with a focus on observing inter-group conflicts.

Letter from Helen Hickey to Mrs. King

Monday, April 8, 1968

In this letter Helen Hickey sends her sympathy to Mrs. King pertaining to the loss of her husband. She also comments on the personal characteristics that she admired most about Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, October 19, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Benjamin E. Mays that Dr. King will attend the Morehouse Board of Trustees luncheon.

Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 7, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Ms. Daves writes Dr. King concerning an invitation to speak from the University Settlement.

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965
Alabama (AL)

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.