Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Mississippi (MS)"

Celsus

Dr. King writes about Celsus, a second century Greek philosopher who opposed Christianity.

Letter from Mr. John W. Hall to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966

Mr. Hall of Pomona, California shows his support for Dr. King and the SCLC through an ongoing monetary contribution.

Letter from Sevy Powell to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

evy Powell expresses her view that President Johnson has done more for Negroes than President Kennedy did and Robert Kennedy or Sen. Eugene McCarthy can do because of his ability to influence Congress.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Letter from John Brooks to MLK

John Brooks affirms the importance of Dr. King's work and informs Dr. King of an enclosed contribution to the SCLC.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. William Lawson

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Dora McDonald writes in response to a request from Reverend William Lawson of Texas Southern University. McDonald encloses a biographical sketch and photograph of Dr. King, then relays a message from the Reverend to exclude a reception for him on May 17.

Letter from MLK to Esther Thompson

Monday, November 29, 1965

Dr. King informs Mrs. Thompson that the SCLC does not have the resources to help aid her husband's sight. Dr. King recommends that she contact churches in her area for help.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald about obtaining a copy of the speech Dr. King made to the New York City Bar Association.

SCLC Executive Staff Meeting

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Dr. King provides Civil Rights Activist, Septima Clark, with information regarding the Executive Staff meeting for the SCLC. Dr. King requests that Ms. Clark have her report ready to present prior to the meeting.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King in response to a telegram sent by the Reverend protesting action be taken by the State of Louisiana against the Southern Conference Educational Fund.

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

Letter from MLK to Emily C. Greco

Wednesday, March 7, 1962

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of The Winsor School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Memorandum Regarding The March On Washington For Jobs and Freedom

In this memorandum, Bayard Rustin provides various civil rights leaders with the agenda for their upcoming leadership meeting regarding the 1963 March on Washington For Jobs and Freedom.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Thomas W. Johnson Declining an Invitation to Write an Article

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This letter from Dora McDonald to Thomas W. Johnson is in response to a request for Dr. King to write an article for the December 12, 1966 edition of The Forum. Dora McDonald informs Thomas W. Johnson that Dr. King regrets his inability to accept the invitation at this time.

Letter from Edward Kuhn, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1961

Edward Kuhn, Jr. provides Dr. King with Bernards Taper's short book on the Tuskegee Gerrymander Case and requests his feedback. Dr. King is informed that his comment will be placed on the "jacket" of the book.

MLK Draft from Strength to Love: The Answer to a Perplexing Question

Here is a draft chapter from Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" in which Dr. King discusses that the casting out of evil in human lives requires "both man and God."

Materialism

Dr. King documents a quote by Robert Flint, a Scottish theologian and philosopher in reference to "materialism" from the "Baird Lectures."

Letter from F.A. Guilford to MLK

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

F.A. Guilford of Oxford University Press asks permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" for their third edition textbook "Free Government in the Making." He further requests to obtain the world rights to the letter for worldwide distribution.

God, Knowledge Of (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "How Do We Know God?" from the Journal of Religion.

Letter from Rev. Sandy F. Ray to MLK

Friday, July 15, 1966

Rev. Sandy Ray (Uncle Sandy), of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Brooklyn, New York, expresses deep appreciation to Dr. King for his sermon "Guidelines for a Constructive Church," delivered at the dedication of their new Center.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

Letter from Lia Bosonetto to MLK Regarding Langston Hughes

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Lia Bosonetto, a college student in Italy, writes Dr. King requesting information on Langston Hughes for her thesis.

The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King quotes "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy."

Rousseau

Dr. King writes a quote from Genevan philosopher, Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Adverse Postcard

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

The author of this postcard questions the concept of Black Power and informs Dr. King of his dismay for integration.

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Thursday, January 18, 1962

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.

Telegram from Congressman Charles E. Bennett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Charles Bennett informs Dr. King that the Celler Bill does not apply to all states, though he feels that it should. The Celler Bill, introduced by New York Democratic Congressman Emmanuel Celler, would prohibit the purchase of rifles, shotguns and handguns by direct mail.