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"Mississippi (MS)"

Letter from Frank Van Leemput to MLK

Saturday, December 30, 1967

Frank Ban Leemput, a high school student from Belgium, requests Dr. King provide signatures for the enclosed photos. Mr. Leemput is creating a biography of Dr. King and is in admiration of his political activism as well as achievements in the field of desegregation.

1964 Election


Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

A Statement by Dr. King

Sunday, July 17, 1966
Chicago, IL

In a statement made in Chicago, Dr. King asks for the economic and social betterment of the individuals living in the "slums" of the city.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

B. Clifton Reardon Recap of William Temple

London, England, New York (NY)

This is an essay written by B. Clifton Reardon on William Temple, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Temple was one of the founding members of the Council of Christians and Jews.

II Samuel Class Notes

Dr. King outlines the biblical Book of II Samuel by topic.

Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Old Bull, The Great Violinist

Dr. King relates the mishap of a great violinist, during a concert, to the general act of overcoming obstacles in life.

Letter from John Dempsey to S. Ernest Vandiver

Monday, July 30, 1962
Albany, GA, Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Connecticut governor John Dempsey writes to Georgia governor S. Earnest Vandiver expressing his concern for the safety of Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, April 7, 1964
New York, NY

This letter from Ms. Daves to Dr. King references royalties due on "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love." She also suggests that Dr. King send the bills for the shipments to her office if Dr. King wants control over the deductions.

Spelman College Founders Day

Sunday, April 10, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is a program for Spelman College's Seventy-Ninth Anniversary Founders Day celebration, which featured an address by Dr. King.

SCLC: Tenth Annual Convention

Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Texas (TX), North Carolina (NC), Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA)

This program denotes the key leaders for the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC held in Jackson, Mississippi. It also outlines the timeline of events for the four-day convention, noting a foreword written by Dr. King.

Letter from the University of Capetown to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland

Monica Wilson asks if Dr. King can deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town.

At the Beginning of the Youth Leadership Conference

Friday, April 15, 1960
North Carolina (NC)

While speaking to the Youth Leadership Conference in Raleigh, NC, Dr. King elaborates on the student sit-in movements, which he says served as a representation of the plight of the American Negro regarding their struggle for justice. Dr. King further lists the various details of their strategy for victory.

Letter from William Stuart Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
Washington, D.C., INDIA

William Stuart Nelson writes Dr King prompting him to take into consideration a request from Mr. G. L. Mehta as will as to visit Africa. Nelson comments on the importance of the non-violence concept being propagated across India and Africa.

Letter from Dora McDonald to F.A. Guilford

Monday, September 14, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Berlin, Germany

Dora McDonald expresses Dr. King's delight in knowing that F.A. Guilford of Oxford University Press wants to reprint the "Letter from Birmingham Jail." However, she informs Guilford that, due to the letter already being published, it is impossible for a reprint. McDonald refers Guilford to contact Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, for more information.

Letter from Bill Kunstler to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963
New York, NY, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD

Famed civil rights attorney William Kunstler states that this was the first time a federal court enjoined prosecution of contempt cases under a state injunction. He would like to use the same procedures in Mississippi.

Letter from Marie Turner to MLK

Thursday, May 2, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this letter Marie Turner of the American Friends Service Committee requests copies of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" to be reproduced and distributed.

Letter from MLK to Hattie Brown

Thursday, July 15, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King writes Hattie Brown, President of the Women's Society at Tremont Baptist Church, expressing his deep appreciation to Reverend Ruland and the members of the Society for their financial contribution to the SCLC.

"King's New Book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 23, 1967
Missouri (MO)

This Argus newspaper clipping is a mini review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Arnold Krakower to MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Attorney Arnold Krakower explains to Dr. King the reasons why he must reject a financial appeal to aid the SCLC. According to Krakower, Dr. King's position in the civil rights movement gave him high notoriety. However, once Dr. King turned his attention to oppose the war in Vietnam, Krakower believes he has no choice but to object mixing civil rights and foreign policy.

Religious Witness For Human Dignity Booklet

Sunday, May 31, 1964
Los Angeles, CA

Religious Witness for Human Dignity seeks the support of members of the Protestant, Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Jewish Communities in the struggle for civil rights.

News from the American Jewish Committee

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

This news release announces that John Gardner, former Secretary of Health (among other positions) accepted the head position of the Urban Coalition, a campaign that combats urban poverty.

The Many Faces of Black Power


The author identifies several approaches to the notion of Black Power. The author concludes that Black Power is "a programmatic concept capable of objective definition", "it presents many difficulties", and that the negatives have outweighed the positives.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Monday, February 24, 1964
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, MEXICO, CUBA, Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA, Minnesota (MN), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Missouri (MO), Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Louisville, KY, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Texas (TX), INDIA, Florida (FL), Tallahassee, FL, Detroit, MI, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, Pittsburgh, PA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.


Dr. King records teachings of German theologian and philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher that Dr. King feels "make his theology a religious psychology."

Telegram from Trinity Cathedral to MLK

Friday, May 24, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

Members of Trinity Cathedral in Newark, New Jersey offer their support to Dr. King and others "who are endangering your lives for the sake of others." Dr. King received this telegram in the midst of the desegregation campaign in Birmingham, 1963.

Letter from David H. McKillop to MLK

Thursday, November 12, 1964
SPAIN, Washington, D.C.

David McKillop informs Dr. King that the United States Consulate General in Barcelona received a letter from five Spanish citizens congratulating him for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from Bea and Andy Stanley to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Bea and Andy Stanley send Dr. King a telegram while he is in the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta. The Stanley's express, "we are inexpressibly proud that the determination to end segregation is upheld with such dignity and self sacrifice."