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Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, Washington, D.C.

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from William H. Chester to MLK

Friday, September 6, 1963
San Francisco, CA, SOUTH AFRICA, California (CA)

William H. Chester writes Dr. King enclosing a donation to the SCLC from Mary Louise Hooper, chairman of the Northern California Committee on African Affairs, on behalf of the San Francisco Church-Labor Conference. The organization conducted a Human Rights Day parade that was broadcast in Africa. Mr. Chester further informs Dr. King that Mrs. Hooper encourages the SCLC to "keep moving forward until victory is achieved."

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, ITALY

Rodney Clurman writes to Dr. King concerning recent updates with regard to political and social agendas. He concludes by requesting a wire transfer to his current location in New York City.

MLK Note

New York (NY)

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Guide for Churchmen in Interracial Conflict Situations

Wednesday, March 29, 1967
New Orleans, LA

In this document, the Southern Field Service encourages church leaders to aid in African American social justice mobilization.

Letter from W. J. Murphy to Deton Brooks

Monday, July 11, 1966
Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL

Congressman W. J. Murphy writes this letter to Dr. Deton Brooks, Executive Director of the Commission on Urban Opportunity. After listening to a radio show, of which Dr. Brooks and Dr. King posed commentary, Murphy was prompted with a response towards solving America's racial issues. Murphy states he initially opposed the executively ordered Fair Employment Practices Commission for the reason that brotherly love could not be legislated. FEPC requires that companies in governmental contract could not discriminate on the basis of race or religion.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Maude Ballou

Wednesday, January 23, 1957
Atlanta, GA

Coretta Scott King offers her gratitude to Maude Ballou for her sending a form for a birth certificate.

A Proposal for Unity Day

Tuesday, March 15, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, UNITED KINGDOM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CHINA, California (CA), San Francisco, CA, GERMANY, COSTA RICA, LEBANON, PHILIPPINES, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, Washington, D.C., JAPAN, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Joseph Polowsky composed a proposal to present to the United Nations for the creation of an April 25th holiday, to be known as Unity Day. This holiday is in commemoration of a conference of the war-time allied nations in San Francisco.

Letter from Clark Foreman to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Clark Foreman, Director of the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Foreman also asks Dr. King to send a message of congratulations to Dr. James A. Dombrowski, who will receive the Tom Paine Award at the 1964 Bill of Rights Dinner. Dombrowski, a Methodist minister, was co-founder of the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967
INDIA, New York, NY

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Helga Gulbrandsen responds to a previous letter from Dr. King and congratulates him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Gulbrandsen expresses regret concerning the Reverend's unavailability for a lecture in the Oslo Group.

Letter from Maurice Mitchell to Neil Sullivan

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
Denver, CO, Berkeley, CA, Chicago, IL

Mr. Mitchell discusses fundraising for SCLC's Chicago literacy project. HEW recently withdrew their support of the project, but Mitchell is optimistic about potential support from foundations and major donors.

Letter from MLK to Alice Sargent

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak at Temple University from the Assistant Director of Student Activities. He states that he enjoys speaking with college and university students, he gracefully declines the invitation due to his civil rights commitments in the South. He also addresses Mrs. Sargent's question presented in her letter regarding the role Temple University can play in the Civil Rights Movement. He tells her that Rev. C.T. Vivian, Dr.

The Dilemma of White America

Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Notes Regarding Marriage

The handwritten outline conveyed Dr. King's view on marriage and what is required to maintain a happy union.

Letter from William E. Mason to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
PUERTO RICO

Bill Mason writes to discuss Dr. King's trip to Puerto Rico and reminds him of their conversation about the efforts of the SCLC. Mason explains that he is operating the first interracial camp on the island throughout the summer and hopes that he will be able to assist the SCLC sometime during the year.

Letter from MLK to Jonathan B. Bingham

Monday, February 28, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King responds to Congressman Bingham's request for information concerning SCLC's position on foreign policy matters and donor contributions. Dr. King informs the congressman that the organization decided at a recent convention to "have SCLC abstain from foreign policy matters," in order to preserve its civil rights objectives and donor's trust. However, Dr. King states that SCLC permits individual employees to assume whatever position they choose regarding foreign policy matters, and contributes his public statements concerning Vietnam to this privilege.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi S. Burr Yampol

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rabbi Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, for sending a copy of his organization's resolution.

Judgment

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the subject judgment.

Letter of Support from Bishop W.M. Jones

Wednesday, September 4, 1963
Illinois (IL), ISRAEL

Bishop W. M. Jones drafts this correspondence to Dr. King, offering prayers to him and his co-workers.

God

Dr. King elaborates on Thomas Aquinas' views on the existence of God.

Letter from Jean Ward Wolff to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Jean Ward Wolff expresses her concern about Dr. King turning his back on truth and justice in the form of supporting Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from John to MLK

Connecticut (CT), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

John discusses some points on religious ethics with Dr. King and offers gratitude for a Labor Day dinner with the King family.

Knowledge

Dr. King outlines epistemological claims that deal with the "universals" and the "particulars" of knowledge. In doing so, he references the philosophical views of Socrates and St. Thomas Aquinas.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Pamphlet About the Black Panther Party

Wednesday, June 1, 1966
Alabama (AL), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Boston, MA, Selma, AL, Los Angeles, CA

This pamphlet contains historical and contextual references to the Black Panther Party. It also includes a speech by John Hulett and an interview of Stokely Carmichael highlighting the political and social movements occurring in Lowndes County, Alabama.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959
NIGERIA, Georgia (GA), Ohio (OH), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

Note Card on Democritus' Metaphysics

In this notecard, Dr. King writes on the subject of Metaphysics, focusing on the works of Democritus.

Letter from Pastor R. L. Crady to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Pastor Crady expresses concern to Dr. King that the civil rights movement mayl be in vain, because segregationist organizations can use the umbrella of religious protection, along with taxpayer funds, to back up their convictions.