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Letter from MLK to Reverend Arthur McDonald

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Albany, GA

Dr. King writes Reverend Arthur McDonald expressing appreciation for his presence in Albany. He also shares with Reverend Arthur how the non-violent battle in Albany is slowly fading yet the fight for equality is not over.

Letter from MLK to Naomi Thomas

Monday, January 8, 1968
South Africa, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, South Africa

Dr. King explains to Naomi Thomas his reasons for supporting athletes who plan to boycott the Olympics.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), California (CA), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI, Los Angeles, CA, Dallas, TX

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence Kirkpatrick

Friday, July 9, 1965
New York (NY), PUERTO RICO

Dora McDonald sends a biographical sketch and photograph as requested to Laurence Kirkpatrick.

The Massachusetts Review: A Legacy of Creative Protest

Friday, September 7, 1962
Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes of the influence of Henry David Thoreau's essay on the duty of civil disobedience in forming his belief that non-cooperation with evil is a moral obligation. He cites lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, and the bus boycott as evidence that Thoreau’s thinking is still alive. This article appeared in a special 1962 issue of The Massachusetts Review commemorating the centennial of Thoreau’s death.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Neil Crichton-Miller to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
London, England

Neil Crichton-Miller, the Producer of the Talks Department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Crichton-Miller asks Dr. King if they can reschedule a previously cancelled interview with Richard Kershaw and Leigh Crutchley for the BBC's "Frankly Speaking" program. He would like to conduct the interview when Dr. King flies to Europe to receive the Nobel Prize.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. King to Mrs. A. B. Cooper & Family

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. and Mrs. King express their regret for being unable to attend the funeral; however, they offer condolences to Mrs. A. B. Cooper and family for the loss of their loved one.

Letter of Gratitude from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Maurice A. Dawkings, the Assistant Director for Civil Rights, expresses gratitude for the work Dr. King does.

Ordained by God

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King for his proposed hypocrisy. The author contends that violence and law breaking are ungodly behaviors and therefore should not be associated with the peace movement that Dr. King endorses.

Card from the English Family

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The English Family sends a card that lists words of encouragement for each day of the week.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

California (CA), LITHUANIA, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, HUNGARY

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bouwman

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
NETHERLANDS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Madame Bouwman for the enjoyable interview conducted in Holland. Dr. King states he will be returning to Holland in July of 1966 and would be interested in meeting again.

94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Thursday, April 21, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI)

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

Letter from Congressman Marvin Esch to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Congressman Esch expresses appreciation to Dr. King for supporting the anti-poverty program. Attached is a copy of the Congressman's statement regarding the "Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1967."

Letter from Septima Clark to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967
South Carolina (SC)

Ms. Clark writes Dr. King with excitement about her granddaughter's accomplishment as a tutor. After saving her earnings of $5.00 per week, Ms. Clark's granddaughter managed to purchase Dr. King a holiday gift complete with special wrapping.

Letter from Philip Watson to MLK

Monday, December 21, 1964
NORWAY, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Mr. Watson praises Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and describes the award as a "global testimony" to Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

Mississippi (MS)

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Letter from MLK to Louis Pollak

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King writes a recommendation letter for Alan B. Watchel to Dean Louis Pollak of Yale Law School. Dr. King highlights the contributions that Mr. Watchel has made to support the struggle for human dignity and equality.

Letter to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
VIETNAM

The author of this letter writes to oppose Dr. King's view of the government being the greatest infuser of violence. The author attributes Communism as the root of violence, and asks Dr. King to consider the consequences of unfavorable criticism during such times.

Evil

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion" on the topic of evil.

Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Friday, December 27, 1963
Atlantic City, NJ, Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, MEXICO

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In the 3rd installment of "The Martin Luther King Column," Dr. King praises the Jewish people for seeking freedom for all. Dr. King discusses their contributions to "philanthropy and social organization."

The Kinship Between the Labor Unions and Negroes

Dr. King presents a speech at the United Auto Workers Convention in May 1961, which acknowledges the new challenges faced by factory workers because of technological advances that threaten to leave them jobless. He draws a parallel between the plight of auto workers and the Negro experiences of disenfranchisement in the US to highlight the potential for alliance between the two groups.

Miracles

EGYPT, ISRAEL

Dr. King paraphrases the Old Testament scripture of Exodus chapter 13, verse 22, in which God leads the Israelites with a cloud by day and a a pillar of fire by night.

Jesus

Dr. King highlights the significant characteristics of Jesus Christ.

Request from The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Ohio (OH)

The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization inquires if Dr. King would be available to speak to the institute about the concept of Black Power.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Call to Survival

Sunday, November 5, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This advertisement offers a "realistic appraisal" of the Vietnam situation and offers possible solutions.

Boston University Graduation Exercises

Sunday, June 5, 1955
Boston, MA

Boston University awards an honorary PhD of Laws to John F. Kennedy.