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"Missouri (MO)"

The Dilemma of White America

Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Friday, January 25, 1985
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from Edward McGaughy to MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963
Tennessee (TN), New York (NY)

Edward McGaughy writes to Dr. King suggesting a "Christmas for Human Rights." The writer highlights a strategy to help make it possible for families in need to receive aid.

Letter From George Patton Jr. to MLK

New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

George Patton expresses his disdain to Dr. King about the names that whites call "Black Americans" and offers a list of names that blacks should be "referred to as."

Telegram from Rev. Enoch Jones to MLK

Saturday, November 28, 1964
Nashville, TN, Atlanta, GA

Reverend Enoch Jones informs Dr. King that the Baptist Minsters Conference of Nashville, Tennessee have selected Dr. King for their Emancipation Proclamation speaker. Reverend Jones provides information about the event in hopes that Dr. King will accept.

Letter from National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

The National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower informs Dr. King of the tremendous strides made by the African American community during the elections in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Four years prior, the loss of elections by black candidates was attributed to local intimidation, but new organizational tactics provided the group with tools to combat this issue. The success of the election set a precedent for many other Mississippi counties to view voting rights as a means to change citizens' lives and the nature of the state.

Letter from Rev. Charles William Butler to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King writes to Rev. Charles William Butler of the Metropolitan Baptist Church to acknowledge receipt of his kind letter concerning moral support. Dr. King references his shock of reading about a vicious attack made by Dr. Jackson accusing him of conspiracy. Stating that numerous friends have suggested that the Reverend sue Jackson, Dr. King expresses his decision to be adherent to his basic philosophy of non-violence.

At the Beginning of the Youth Leadership Conference

Friday, April 15, 1960
North Carolina (NC)

While speaking to the Youth Leadership Conference in Raleigh, NC, Dr. King elaborates on the student sit-in movements, which he says served as a representation of the plight of the American Negro regarding their struggle for justice. Dr. King further lists the various details of their strategy for victory.

Operation Freedom Helps In Selma

Lowndes County, AL, Selma, AL

This document provides details about three specific individuals from Selma who were fired from their jobs after their employers learned of their participation in the Civil Rights Movement. Unemployed and on the verge of disaster, Operation Freedom stepped in and provided financial aid to the three individuals, to cover the cost of food, housing, transportation and medical care.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

New York, NY

Joan Daves writes Dr. King to express her concern about Miss Hoover contacting Dr. King instead of herself regarding his upcoming book.

Letter from Robert D. Heslep to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Georgia (GA)

The Philosophy of Education Society, Southeastern Region writes Dr. King giving full moral support in the development of "The Poor People's Washington Campaign."

Paul's Letter to American Christians

FRANCE, New York (NY)

This is a sermon chapter and possible draft for Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." Dr. King writes from the perspective of Paul the Apostle. Through the words of King, Paul speaks to modern day American Christians and challenges them to uphold true Christian values. Paul notes the presence of economic, scientific, and technological development, yet questions the contradiction of social injustices in a society that seems so advanced.

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

The Method of Personalism

Personalism is a philosophical thought that attempts to understand the unparalleled identity of human's in relation to nature. Dr. King references this ideology with a handwritten note.

Revelation

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Draft Letter from MLK to Donald DuMont

This draft by Dr. King addresses the goals and similarities of the SCLC with Christian principles. He asserts that the aims of the SCLC "...are [to] work to provide those same basic needs for all men."

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

Letter from Jack Thayer to Mrs. King

Friday, January 19, 1968
Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Jack Thayer, of KLAC Radio, writes to Mrs. King thanking her for a recent guest appearance on "Two-Way Radio," in Southern California.

Letter from Mrs. Bill Green to MLK

Monday, May 27, 1963
Chattanooga, TN

Mrs. Bill Green, an uneducated white woman, informs Dr. King on the spiriutal words she has recieved from God. Mrs. Green asserts that she recieved this insight after she envisioned the struggle Dr. king has endured. She lists four ideas surrounding the lack of collectivity amongst the races and the acknowledgment of the power of prayer.

Letter from Miss Edythe T. Gore to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963
Missouri (MO), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri donates $125.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Reverend Charles G. Adams to a Fellow Minister about the Concord Towers Campaign

Monday, March 25, 1968
Boston, MA

In this letter, Rev. Charles G. Adams requests financial donations to be used for the Concord Towers Campaign in Boston, which is a campaign to benefit certain families currently living in substandard dwellings.

Letter from Robert E. Harding, Thomas H. Weddington and Celestine B. Bailey to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967
New York, NY

Robert E. Harding Jr., Thomas H. Weddington, and Celestine B. Bailey detail the many allegations of racial discrimination involving employees from the National Labor Relations Board. These issues have conflicted with the Equal Employment Opportunity and the Civil Service Rules and Regulations. Harding, Weddington, and Bailey request Dr. King's assistance to correct this issue.

SCLC Initiative Invitation: Poor People's Campaign Committee

Washington, D.C.

This recruitment letter is an invitation to volunteer for various committees to support the SCLC's Washington, D.C. initiative Poor People's Campaign. The committees cover areas from child care to fundraising and legal aid. The Campaign began in November 1967, but became bogged down due not only to Dr. King's assassination, but also that of Robert F. Kennedy's. The Campaign ceased operations in June 1968 but was resurrected in December, 2003.

Royalty Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom"

Thursday, July 25, 1963
London, England

The document shown here is a book royalty statement for Dr. King's first book, "Stride Toward Freedom."

1967 Morehouse Football Complimentary Season Ticket

This is a 1967 complimentary Season Football Ticket from the Department of Physical Education at Morehouse College to Dr. King.

A Chronology of Violence and Intimidation in Mississippi Since 1961

Thursday, April 4, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This pamphlet produced by SNCC includes a number of reported violent attacks and intimidation tactics imposed on black Mississippi citizens from January 1, 1961 through February 4, 1964.

Oxford Movement

UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King explains the Oxford Movement, a nineteenth century movement within the Anglican Church.

Telegram from MLK to Edward M. Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his gratification to Senator Edward M. Kennedy for sponsoring the amendment to abolish the poll tax in state elections.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marshall E. Bean

Thursday, July 8, 1965
Maine (ME)

Dora McDonald communicates to Marshall E. Bean that Dr. King is remembering him in his prayers and sends a photograph as a visual reminder. Miss McDonald also includes a scripture from the Book of Psalms.

MLK's Speaking Itinerary

JAMAICA, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL), Ohio (OH), Virginia (VA)

This list of speaking engagements documents Dr. King's busy schedule, in June 1965.