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"Montgomery, AL"

Letter from Townsend Scudder to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964

Townsend Scudder, of the Friends Service Committee, contacts Dr. King to request the use and reproduction of the Birmingham Letter to appear in their pamphlet.

Letter from Marie Brookter to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Marie Brookter offers Dr. King "information as to the needs of the Poor" in preparation for the upcoming March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Letter from Reverend Casper Glenn to MLK

Friday, August 30, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Arizona (AZ)

Rev. Casper Glenn, president of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, writes to Dr. King regarding rights to a recording of the "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Frank Elliott

Monday, February 4, 1963
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald responded to Frank Elliott's letter regarding Dr. King's schedule. Additionally, She requested for Elliott to send out an annoucement to people who had been requesting Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Minerva Moreno to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Minerva Moreno, a New York City student, offers her sympathy to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from John Brush to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

John W. Brush expresses his dissent with Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts for changing his stance on the Vietnam War. Brush also commends Dr. King on his oppositional stance.

Special Message to the Members of Congress

Thursday, May 25, 1967
Maryland (MD)

In this letter, John Doyle Elliott, a national pension lobbyist, informs members of congress what he feels can end the loss of income. According to this letter, attached was the Pay-As-You-Go Social Security and Prosperity Insurance Act.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, CANADA

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

Letter from Eva Rosenfeld to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Eva Rosenfeld writes Dr. King expressing her support of his stance on the Vietnam War, regardless of critics like the NAACP. She asserts that King's mentality is wise and "that hope for all of us lies in seeing these issues as one issue, an issue of our humanity."

Letter from MLK to Maj Palmberg

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Dr. King's informs Miss Palmberg that he is unable to accept her invitation to visit Finland.

SCLC Brochure: This is SCLC

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Selma, AL, Tallahassee, FL, New York (NY), Washington, D.C., New Orleans, LA, New York, NY, Little Rock, AR, Cincinnati, OH, Nashville, TN, Memphis, TN, South Carolina (SC), Massachusetts (MA), Baltimore, MD, Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Louisville, KY, North Carolina (NC), Maryland (MD), Tennessee (TN), Kentucky (KY), Ohio (OH)

SCLC outlines its history, achievements, initiatives and leadership in this brochure.

Letter from Rev. Jesse Jackson to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Chicago, IL

In an effort to make Operation Breadbasket successful ,the SCLC held seminars to help the negro businessmen develop their businesses. Jackson invites Dr. King and anyone else he wants to bring as an informal resource during the seminar.

Symbolism and the Cross

Dr. King records notes on symbolism as the expression of spiritual truths.

Race Relations Sunday

Sunday, February 13, 1955

The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America writes a message regarding race relations. The message discusses God's stance on prejudice and racism, stating that any prejudice act is against the will of God.

The Cold War: The Insanity of Deterrence


This brochure depicts a child asking "mommy, what's an H bomb?" and serves as anti-nuclear war propaganda.

Letter from Archbishop Hallinan to MLK

In this letter, Archbishop Hallinan offers his words of gratitude to Dr. King, for his work, and requests a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Montgomery, AL, CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Georgia (GA), Detroit, MI, Geneva, Switzerland, FRANCE, THAILAND, GUATEMALA, COLOMBIA, PERU, VENEZUELA

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Letter from Francis Stern to MLK

Friday, February 19, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY)

Francis H. Stern, Chairman of the Humanitarian Award Committee, writes Dr. King informing him that he has been selected unanimously to receive the 1964 Brith Sholom Humanitarian Award. Stern points out that past recipients include Eleanor Roosevelt, Thurgood Marshall, Rabbi Stephen Wise, UN secretary general Trygvie Lie, and former Prime Minister of Australia Herbert Evatt.

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Birmingham, AL

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Sin (Augustine's definition)

Dr. King records a note on St. Augustine's definition sin, referencing passages from Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation," volume 1: "Human Nature."

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Monday, July 22, 1963
Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI)

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.


Dr. King paraphrases Karl Barth's description of the resurrection in "The Epistle to the Romans."

Telegram from Ike Knight to MLK

Georgia (GA)

Ike Knight notifies Dr. King about civil rights issues concerning steel workers going on strike.

Statement on the Muhammed Ali World Heavyweight Title Controversy

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

An unknown author declares a boycott of all fight games until the Boxing Commission restores Muhammad Ali's World Heavyweight Title.

Letter from Moss Kendrix to MLK

Wednesday, February 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA, Los Angeles, CA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Kendrix wishes to meet with Dr. King to discuss a certain rumor concerning him and the Coca-Cola Company.

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Selma, AL

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.

Letter From Bernard Lafayette, Jr. to Dennis Brunn

Thursday, January 25, 1968
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

This is a memorandum thanking Mr. Brunn for his letter of support for the labor unions.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Housing Plan at Gadsden Is Upheld

Thursday, October 11, 1962
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Negroes in Gadsden, Alabama who wanted to stop urban redevelopment plan which would segregate the Negroes.