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Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 6, 1967
New York (NY)

Joan Daves sends Dora McDonald a letter of thanks concerning a photostat of a letter sent to Dr. King. She also informs her that although the title of Dr. King's book has been used, one cannot copyright titles.

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Kansas (KS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Monday, August 21, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967
Geneva, Switzerland

Jacques Muhlethaler writes Dr. King requesting that he accept a committee position with EIP. The EIP is an organization seeking to contribute to world peace by instituting an interdisciplinary curriculum in classrooms domestically and abroad.

The Powell Affair - A Crisis of Morals ad Faith

Monday, February 6, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Connecticut (CT), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY)

The National Committee of Negro Churchmen express disapproval regarding the unseating of Adam Clayton Powell as Representative of the 18th Congressional District of New York, and Chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee. The organization issues a call to Congress and the Democratic Caucus for Powell's re-instatement.

Letter from Abie Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962
New Jersey (NJ), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Williams, a former parishioner of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, now imprisoned, bids Dr. King's pastoral advice. In addition, he requests a few of Dr. Kings books for studying purposes.

Letter from Joseph W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Detroit, MI, South Africa

Joseph W. Williams congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Tuesday, October 16, 1956
New York (NY)

In this early speech to a NY Universalists' convention, Dr. King lays out his nonviolence method, based on Gandhi's. He outlines five of the six principles he will use later. They are: active, courageous resistance; winning the moral conversion of the opponent, not defeating him; attacking the forces of evil, rather than the persons doing evil; using love to avoid "internal violence of the spirit"; and faith in the inclination of the universe towards justice.

SCLC News Release on Voter Registration

Monday, February 19, 1962
Atlanta, GA, PUERTO RICO, Mississippi (MS)

This press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference describes Dr. King's prediction that many African-Americans would register to vote in the upcoming election. Dr. King also remarks that President Kennedy "has not lived up to his civil rights campaign promises."

Telegram from Supporters to MLK

Birmingham, AL

This telegram of support was sent to Dr. King while incarcerated in the Bessemer County Jail.

The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story

Monday, December 31, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This dramatic story gives a riveting account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott movement and its aim to end segregation of the public transit in Montgomery, Alabama after the arrest of Rosa Parks. E.D. Nixon and other ministers illustrate the philosophy of nonviolent tactics employed by the Montgomery Improvement Association and their struggle for "cosmic companionship."

Letter from Mary Ann Johnson to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), VIETNAM

Mary Ann Johnson of Boston thanks Dr. King for taking a stand against the bombing in Vietnam. Johnson stresses that funds supplied for the war cripples the wages of working people in America.

Letter from Diane Szymkowski to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Diane Szymkowski of Villa Maria College in Buffalo, New York, writes Dr. King requesting campaign materials such as posters and buttons. She expresses their desire to conduct a campaign for the students illustrating multiple candidates.

An Invitation to a Dedication by Olivet and Her Friends

Wednesday, June 1, 1966
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Olivet Institutional Baptist Church sponsors a month long dedication to the opening of the O. M. Hoover Christian Community Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. King is listed as a participant in the dedication.

Letter from Gerald H. Anderson to MLK

Friday, April 10, 1964
PHILIPPINES

Gerald Anderson, the Academic Dean at Union Theolgical Seminary, writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to a volume of sermons for publishing.

Christ

Dr. King quotes a passage from Adolf Harnack's "What Is Christianity?" in which Harnack contrasts Plato's focus on the wise with that of Jesus Christ, who finds value in every human.

Letter from Kent Bach to MLK

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
VIETNAM, Berkeley, CA

In this letter Kent Bach requests Dr. King's endorsement of "Lights On For Peace." Kent Bach plans to run a full-page ad in the New York Times expressing his objection to America's military involvement in Vietnam.

Chicago Nonviolent Action Proposal

Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Indiana (IN), Louisville, KY, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Kentucky (KY), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

SCLC's proposal for a nonviolent action campaign in Chicago identifies the city as the prototype for the northern urban race problem. The proposal includes a snapshot of the situation in Chicago, past approaches, SCLC?s philosophy of social change, a description of twelve different aspects of the problem of economic exploitation, and a plan and timetable for mobilizing forces. Objectives are stated for the federal, state, and local levels. SCLC proposes to work in collaboration with the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations.

Letter from Samuel Aggrey Forson

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
GHANA

Samuel Aggrey Forson, President of the International Affairs Association of Legon, writes to convey condolences regarding the assassination of MLK., Jr.

Letter from Gloria Kenny to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Kenny encloses her monthly contribution of $50 to the SCLC and reports that a recent recruitment letter has resulted in 18 potential new members.

Statement Condemning Judge Elliot's Restraining Order

Sunday, July 22, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King and Dr. William G. Anderson, President of the Albany Movement, denounce US District Judge J. Robert Elliott's temporary restraining order that prevents them from staging protests. They add that, out of respect for the federal judiciary, they will abide by the order and appeal to a higher level. They assume the order applies only to the named defendants and colleagues and not to the entire community and will not discourage others from taking action. Judge Elliott’s injunction was later overturned by the Fifth Circuit US Court of Appeals.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Miss R. Berkenvelder

Monday, November 22, 1965

Dr. King writes to Miss Berkenvelder, agreeing that silent and non-active individuals maintained the severity of injustices. He further elaborates on his prayer that warriors will form who are committed to nonviolence and world peace.

Telegram from Al C. Hastings to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Alabama (AL), Florida (FL)

Al Hastings expresses his concern during Dr. King's incarceration in the Jefferson County Jail.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

Wednesday, October 17, 1962
Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

MLK's Address to Addison Junior High

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King explains the importance of education and encourages the students to exercise their abilities to the fullest and strive for excellence. Dr. King further describes the duties each student must fulfill to make an impact on their community and the world.

Letter from MLK to Reverend W.E. Gardner

Wednesday, February 28, 1962
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of the First Baptist Church in Long Island, New York.