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"Montgomery, AL"

Letter from MLK to Susan Rowland

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

Dr. King informs Susan Roland, a member of the Student Christian Movement at the University of Western Ontario, that due to numerous commitments, he will be unable to accept the invitation to speak at the institution.

Letter from Clarence H. Haines to MLK

Wednesday, August 3, 1966

Clarence Haines encloses a donation and comments on economic power. Haines suggests a verbal network between Negros so they can learn which stores are integrated and friendly in order to support those business owners.

Paul's Letter to American Christians

Sunday, November 4, 1956

Dr. King shares "Paul's Letter to American Christians" with the congregation of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In this contemporary letter revised by Dr. King, Apostle Paul writes concerning the "responsibilities of Americans to live as Christians." He discusses his appreciation for America, the danger of capitalism, communism, segregation in churches, and the many denominations of Protestantism. But above all things, Apostle Paul believes that love is the most "durable power in the world."

Wellesley class of 1966 letter to Dr.King

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

Wellesley College class of 1966 asks Dr.King to become an honorable member of their class.

Let's Be Human

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

Letter to Dora McDonald Regarding Persons Receiving Autographed Books

Thursday, June 29, 1967

Dora McDonald receives a list of names who are to receive autographed copies of Dr. King's book. The list consists of contributors to American Foundation on Nonviolence and SCLC.

Telegram from Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights to MLK

Thursday, August 9, 1962

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and its executives offer support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Albany jail.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Royalty Statement: Why We Can't Wait

Monday, April 3, 1967

This royalty statement details Dr. King's earnings for the book "Why We Can't Wait" over a six month period.

Letter from P. M. Smith to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

P. M. Smith writes Dora McDonald thanking her on Dr. Ruden's behalf for a letter regarding Dr. King's visit to Amsterdam. Miss Smith references a previous correspondence from Dr. Ruden's informing Miss McDonald of the schedule for Dr. King's visit.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

In this letter Ms. Daves informs Dr. King that she is working to solve issue of copyright for his Oslo University address, and stresses the importance of copyrighting all of his "writings...and speeches."

Letter from MLK to John Frink

Friday, January 5, 1968

In this letter, dated January 5, 1968, Dr. King writes to John A. Frink expressing his gratitude for his contribution to the S.C.L.C.

The Martin Luther King Column

This column, written by Dr. King, depicts his philosophy on the complete human life. He describes life to have three separate, yet connected dimensions. These dimensions are denoted as: length, breadth, and height. All are defined in great detail according to the Reverend's belief and experiences.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

David T. Doherty Letter of Request to Dr. King

Friday, February 10, 1967

Mr. Deherty, a PH.D candidate at Stanford University, asks Dr. King if he will answer a few questions regarding the influence of Henry David Thoreau on his philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from John A. Collison to MLK

Saturday, August 15, 1964

John Collision writes Dr. King regarding race relations in America. Collision wants Dr. King to understand that majority of whites have no hatred toward blacks, but instead "a strangeness" and questioning of why people are different shades.

Telegram from Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz offer their encouragement to Dr. King.

Prophet

Dr. King references John C. Archer's "Faiths Men Live By."

SCLC Press Release for Mrs. King

Monday, October 19, 1964

This document announces Mrs. King's election to the Board of the United Church Women.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 3, 1965

H. C. Huntley invites Dr. King to come speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Scotland during Holy Week.

Letter from Thomas Gilliam to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967

Thomas Gilliam writes this letter with hope that Dr. King will grant him an interview about the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Albany Movement Statement

Sunday, July 1, 1962

This statement is written on behalf of people of faith who have come to support the Albany Movement. The ills experienced by the Negro community in Albany are rooted in racial separation, it says. The document requests a meeting with the City Commission to review their response to peaceful protest, clarification of the City’s position on an ICC ruling on segregated buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to make recommendations on desegregation.

MLK Memorial Service Program in Seattle, Washington

Sunday, April 7, 1968

Three days after the death of Dr. King this memorial service, conducted by Reverend Theodore Kennedy, took place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Seattle.

Letter to MLK from VP Hubert H. Humphrey

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This letter from Dr. King is from Vice President Humphrey and references recommendations for personnel and employment opportunities.

Americans Need Some Discipline

This Daily Californian editorial calls for "self-restraint" in civil rights demonstrations and a return to the "hard work, thrift, and adherence to the moral precepts that form the basis for this democracy." It continues to maintain that gratuitous demonstrations cause racial riots and violence, provoking the "wrath of whites who resent Negro intrusion in their neighborhoods" and thus undermine political support for Dr. King's cause. Dr.

Letter from Marshall C. Dandy to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Marshall C. Dendy, the Executive Secretary of the Board of Christian Education, invites Dr. King to be a speaker for the organization's conference in Montreat. Dendy also suggests that Dr. King reconsider his stance on America's involvement in Vietnam, even though he also detests war.

Letter from Samuel Kirk to President Johnson

Friday, December 30, 1966

Mr. Kirk, Director of the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children, writes to President Johnson expressing his desire for peace in Vietnam. Kirk suggests that Johnson appoint a Peace Commission consisting of Dr. King and others to help create solutions for ending the war.

Letter from R. Elliot to Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 14, 1968

In this response letter, R. Elliot thanks Dora McDonald for her response to his inquiry regarding the redevelopment of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Tullberg to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

The Tullberg family from New Hampshire conveys their support to Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. They believe that the war is a violation of the basic principles of human rights.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.