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SCLC Switchboard Schedule

This schedule lists the names, dates, and time of SCLC's switchboard operators.

Note from Will Dale to MLK

Will Dale writes Dr. King commending him for encouraging Black athletes to boycott the Olympic games.

Suffering

Dr. King cites chapter 5, verse 7 of the Old Testament book of Job. This scripture highlights the fact that trouble is necessary in life.

Letter from E. H. Williams to MLK

E. H. Williams writes to tell Dr. King of the great job he is doing speaking out on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs to SCLC

Friday, December 30, 1966

June Gordon, Executive Director of Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, encloses a check in the amount of $100. She also encloses material listing activities her organization has initiated.

Letter from Edinburgh University Debate Club to MLK

Thursday, May 20, 1965

James Douglas-Hamilton, the President of Debate Club at Edinburgh University, sends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at a debate against the motion "That Legislation cannot bring about Integration."

Letter from Anthony Cama to Dora McDonald

Sunday, March 3, 1968

Anthony Cama, a member of the Order of Sons of Italy in America, encloses American philosopher Henry David Thoreau's article on slavery.

Itinerary for MLK with Handwritten Notes

This itinerary from 1964 details Dr. King's traveling schedule and contains his handwritten notes with regard to discovering one's purpose in life.

Letter from Harris McDowell, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965

Representative Harris McDowell, Jr. writes Dr. King stating that he voted against seating the Mississippi delegation. McDowell states, "I appreciate having your views regarding this important problem."

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman on the principle of moral law.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. Gosta Dahl

Thursday, June 11, 1964

In this letter, dated June 11, 1964 to Mr. Gosta Dahl, Joan Daves expresses the importance of "Why We Can't Wait" and why they feel it is a "...potentially more successful" work than Dr. King's other two books. Accordingly, they request minimum advance and royalty schedules. She asks that Mr. Dahl check with the Swedish publishers to see if they would raise their offer, for the use of Dr. King's work.

Letter from Mrs. E. A. Johnson to Mrs. Cotton

Saturday, March 31, 1962

A young male civil rights activist and participant in demonstrations experienced police brutality after he was targeted for his involvement in the Monroe Race Riot story. E. A. Johnson provides Mrs. Cotton with the legal details of the case surrounding the young man.

Letter from Joseph Matasovsky to MLK

Thursday, April 23, 1964

A member of the Slovak Catholic Sokol expresses their respect for Dr. King's action against the Vietnam War. The author deems Dr. King a "patriot" and appreciates his spiritual profundity, as well as his intellect surrounding national politics.

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"

Women Are For Peace/Jeanette Rankin Rank and File Poster

Flyer announcing "Women are for Peace" sponsored by Former Congresswoman Jeannette Rankin. Representative Rankin led thousands of women to Washington, DC to petition former colleagues in Congress to end the war.

Letter from William A. Geoghegan to MLK

Wednesday, March 10, 1965

William A. Geoghegan, US Department of Justice Assistant Deputy Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

MLK's Statement to SCLC Describing SCOPE

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

In this statement, Dr. King describes the Summer Community Organization and Political Education (SCOPE), an initiative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Its goals are to train local leaders, inform the public, and register individuals to vote.

Letter from James Gilliam to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1961

Mr. Gilliam sends Dr. King financial support in the amount of fifty dollars.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1968

Harry Wachtel gives Dr. King a monetary birthday gift that he tells Dr. King to use on a much needed vacation.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Letter from Phyllis E. Ames to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Phyllis E. Ames, on behalf of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Young Adults of the New York Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Day of the Lord

Dr. King writes about the "Day of the Lord," as mentioned in the Old Testament book, Zephaniah.

Conference on Strengthening the New Politiics

Sunday, November 28, 1965

The Conference on Strengthening the New Politics was formed from a desire to have real constituencies who have control over their elected officials and a concern for local grassroots political development. It is the hope of this conference that the styles of liberalism and the Civil Rights Movement could come together to form a new elective politic.

Telegram from Ms. Dora McDonald to A.J. Cervantes

Ms. Dora McDonald responded to a telegram sent from St. Louis Mayor A. J. Cervantes, inviting Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is." The conference, held in St. Louis, MO, was to feature civil rights leaders, mayors and other organizers. Ms. McDonald informed Mayor Cervantes that Dr. King was out of town and to look for a response from Dr. King at a later time.

Statement on SCLC Commitment to Albany, Georgia

Thursday, July 12, 1962

Dr. King announces that he is organizing an operation in Albany, Georgia in which the members of the SCLC will be present and active.

Poster: Victory Baptist Church Banquet

This poster announces Victory Baptist Church's 24th anniversary banquet, with Dr. King as guest speaker. Dr. King spoke at this Los Angeles church on June 25, 1967.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author objects to Dr. King's journey to Jerusalem with his followers. He also expresses his perception of the Negro race.

Letter from Richard Chapin to S.C.L.C Board of Directors

Thursday, April 11, 1968

The East Lansing Human Relations Commission writes to express their heartfelt sorrow over the tragic loss of Dr. King. They vow to continue the work of advancing freedom with renewed effort.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes