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Telegram from Planned Parenthood to MLK

Saturday, June 11, 1966

Medora Bass, Planned Parenthood President, asks Dr. King for a response to an invitation to speak at the organization's upcoming annual luncheon.

The Crozer Theological Seminary Student Chapel - Order of Service

Friday, January 27, 1950

This order of service outlines the events taken place during student chapel at The Crozier Theological Seminary. The service was guided by presiding student, Fred Eugene Stom, and focused heavily on Christian affirmations and the reciting of the ten commandments.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Letter from A Friend to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967

In this letter, "a friend" to Dr. King offers suggestions to help the black race become more valuable to society.

Statement by MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.

Letter From Jane Hall to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Jane Hall writes Dr. King suggesting that there be a focus on equitable representation of the negro in television advertising in order to attain "maximum quality and quantity" of integration.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Robert M. Gomsrud to MLK Regarding the Nobel Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964

In this letter, Robert M. Gomsrud, President of the Minneapolis Central Labor Union Council, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Man Who Knows: General Westmoreland on Vietnam

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

This editorial from a New York newspaper features statements from General William C. Westmoreland arguing for the public's support "about what is going on in Viet Nam, and why." Dr. King is among those listed as having opposing viewpoints towards the War.

War by Executive Decree

Citizens for Governmental Restraint favors the impeachment of President Lyndon Johnson for declaring the war in Vietnam by Executive Order.

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

Wednesday, March 9, 1966

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

Letter from Jodi Moses to MLK about TAC Rally

Thursday, May 26, 1966

The Community Relations Committee of the Tenant's Action Council (TAC) writes this letter to Dr. King asking him to speak at a rally being held at the Olivet Community Presbyterian Church in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. J. M. Douglas

Thursday, March 28, 1963

Miss McDonald informs Dr. J. M. Douglas that she has discussed his invitation with Dr. King and that it will be placed in a special folder for further correspondence when there is availability in Dr. King's schedule.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

Monday, March 13, 1967

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

Memo from Gloria Fraction to Andrew Young

Friday, June 17, 1966

Gloria Fraction states Dr. Dorothy Sutton Branch spoke with Dr. King about meeting a group in Lawndale. She also inquires of Andrew Young when Dr. King would be available for an interview with a reporter.

Invitation to Emergency Convocation: The Urban Coalition

Saturday, August 12, 1967

This letter from Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph invites Dr. King to attend the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition, to address the issue of violence in 104 cities. The goals set forth in the letter include an emergency work program, a major expansion of the private sector for job provision and training, and establishment of a long-range program for the physical and social reconstruction of American cities.

Swedish Martin Luther King Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966

The Martin Luther King Fund was an internationally housed organization in which numerous countries participated in helping to support and spread Dr. King's messages. This document represents the facts and activity program of the Swedish organization headquartered in Stockholm. Included are lists of the Executive Committee, Honorary Board members, and activities designed to create a better understanding of Dr. King's work.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

Friday, December 3, 1965

Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

Letter from Clarita Wordlaw to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967

Mrs. Wordlaw requests that Dr. King instructs the New Bern, North Carolina SCLC Chairman to refrain from demonstrations against Negroes. She also informs Dr. King of actions that should be taken to benefit the Negroes of New Bern.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964

Flozella Clark and Agnes Edwards congratulate Dr. King for being awarded the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. They also share what Dr. King's achievement means to them.

Freedom

Dr. King elaborates on the ideas of Paul Tillich regarding the doctrine of freedom. Mr. Tillich details the affirmation of determinism capabilities and the function of "will."

Letter from J. Percy to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

J. Percy sends Dr. King an unpleasant note asserting that he is always complaining. Percy also wishes that Dr. King would stop talking about slums.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

"The American Dream"

Tuesday, June 6, 1961

This transcription of the commencement address delivered by Dr. King at Lincoln University on June 6 1961.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary for Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to students regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Palmberg suggests raising funds in an effort to further Dr. King's nonviolent endeavors in America. Palmberg wrote Dr. King invitations to speak on numerous occasions.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This is the Lincoln Memorial program for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Notable leaders including Dr. King, Walter Reuther, and Whitney M. Young, Jr., will make remarks at the march. Also included is a list of demands, a joint statement from ten organizations and a map.