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Dr. King notes and comments on a quote from James H. Robinson's "The New History" on the eternal law of progress.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

The Women's Strike For Peace organizes a demonstration in Washington, D.C. to bring awareness to the opposition to the Vietnam War. This letter is particular dedicated to the means and cost of transportation to Washington, D.C.

Lawyer Ejected By House Inquiry; Seven Walk Out

Thursday, August 18, 1966

New York lawyer Arthur Kinoy was ejected from the hearing room of the House Committee on Un-American Activities in Washington following a heated legal argument. Seven other lawyers withdrew from the proceedings following Mr. Kinoy's ejection.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Solomon Mendelson

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

In this response letter to Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom in New York, Miss McDonald explains that Dr. King will make all efforts to attend the "I Have a Dream" musical performance.

Letter from June Alder to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mrs. Alder expresses her support and concern regarding integrated housing.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, managing editor for 'The Forum' at Fisk University, explains that a new chapter of SNCC has recently been charted at the school. Johnson also requests that Dr. King write an editorial for their next publication.

Appeal to Community Business People

This document is a letter from the Greater Chicago Scavenger Association to Negro citizens. The letter informs the citizens of the beneficial affect that The Greater Chicago Scavenger Association can have on them and their community.

U.S. Reds Fan Racist Flames To Stir Vietnam War Protest

William F. Buckley, a conservative columnist, decries the involvement of Negro leaders such as Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael n a recent Vietnam War protest. He compares Carmichael with members of the Ku Klux Klan, and he also alleges Communist involvement with the protest.

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Thank you letter to MLK from Major

Major thanks Dr. King for a good meeting and some great plans. He apologizes for his tardiness due to a delay in Washington.

Special Human Rights Year Issue of The Journal of the International Commission of Jurists

Monday, January 1, 1968

This document is informing prospective contributors about the Special Human Rights Year Issue of The Journal of the International Commission of Jurists. Dr. King was listed to contribute to the publication with "Freedom and Equality."

A Knock At Midnight

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

Telegram from Lucious Outlaw to MLK

Dr. King notifies Mr. Lucious Outlaw that he is unable to accept the invitation to speak at Fisk University.

Letter from Dr. John Halsey to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1963

Dr. James Halsey of the University of Bridgeport expresses gratitude for Dr. King's contribution to the Alumni Average Gift Improvement Matching Plan.

Telegram from John Moore to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

John Moore questions Dr. King's Vietnam stance by suggesting that it harms the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter From Ambassador Avraham Harman to MLK

Friday, January 27, 1967

Ambassador Harman congratulates Dr. King for his aspirations concerning an "American Negro Pilgrimage" to Israel. He praises Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize, and discusses the importance of his leadership in this proposed project for peace.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Jespersen Og Pios Forlag has made an offer for the Danish language rights to "Strength To Love." Enclosed are agreements signed by Jespersen Og Pios Forlag.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert Kennedy of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest and expresses his concern for Shuttleworth's safety due to recent threatening activities directed toward nonviolent leaders.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Saturday, July 3, 1965

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

On Being A Good Neighbor

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.

Letter from Robert Bartlett to MLK

The minister of the First Congregational Church sends encouraging words to Dr. King after his attack in Harlem, New York.


Dr. King offers two possible interpretations of Psalms 53:1.

Letter from Ella Jackson to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

Miss Ella Jackson, a 7th grader, writes to Dr. King concerning his leadership and involvement in civil disobedience. She advises Dr. King to speak to someone in power, otherwise his actions will lead to war.

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Monday, December 30, 1963

The Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg invites Dr. King to speak at meeting that will be held at the Pennsylvania State Educational Building. Martin Morand, Vice-President of the Council, also includes information about the issues in Harrisburg's black community to show why Dr. King should accept the invitation.

Address to the National Bar Association

Thursday, August 20, 1959

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Joan Daves reminds Dr. King of her request for an available copy of his "doctors dissertation", for possible national and international publication.

A Program for the Public Meeting at Metropolitan Baptist Church

Thursday, September 27, 1962

This program outlines a two-day Public Meeting sponsored by the SCLC at Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King was scheduled to deliver the key address.

Letter from Rev. A. S. Markham to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

Reverend Markham, Executive Head of the British Methodist Episcopal Church and Executive of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto, informs Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Sholom Synagogue would like to present an award to him. The award honors a person who has contributed to "the needs of humanity in a most outstanding manner."