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Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Saturday, August 31, 1963

Josephine Baker expresses her admiration for Dr. King as a great leader and articulates her commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from William Stuart Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

William Stuart Nelson writes Dr King prompting him to take into consideration a request from Mr. G. L. Mehta as will as to visit Africa. Nelson comments on the importance of the non-violence concept being propagated across India and Africa.

Telegram from Charles Evers to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

This telegram, from board members of MAP, expresses their dissatisfaction with Dr. King's comments regarding refunding efforts of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Letter of Support from New Jersey Resident

Monday, April 10, 1967

Writing a third party, the author of this letter voices his support for Dr. King and his views on the Vietnam war.

Religious Index - MLK Notes

This document illustrates how to put together a sermon for religious services and contains notes from Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."

Cause, Error and Law

Dr. King quotes from Alfred North Whitehead's The Concept of Nature.

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

Letter from Gus C. Zucco to MLK

Friday, October 12, 1962

Gus Zucco writes Dr. King regarding the changes of his schedule in hopes that he will be able to speak in Pennsylvania.

Letter from Froydis Kvaerk to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966

Norwegian student Froydis Kvaerk requests a copy of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in fulfillment of a class assignment on Dr. King and the civil rights struggle.

Remarks at the Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Mathew Ahmann, Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, asserts that the citizens of the US have permitted evil and racial discrimination for too long. He joins forces with those against inequality with hopes for a better lifestyle for all Americans regardless of the color of their skin.

Letter from the N.H.W.P.A to Dr. King

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing his dislike of African Americans.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Clinton Warner

Thursday, May 20, 1965

In this telegram, Dr. King informs Dr. Clinton Warner of Sammy Davis Jr.'s performance at a freedom benefit concert being sponsored by the SCLC. Dr. King then requests that Dr. Warner serve as one of the honorary chairman of the event.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Curtis Barge

Friday, September 24, 1965

In this letter addressed to Rev. Barge and Friends, of the Northern Illinois Ministerial Association. Dr. King expresses his gratitude for a contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the current endeavors of the organization and conveys the importance of their contribution.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale to MLK While in Jaill

Monday, October 24, 1960

Harry Van Asrdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, informs Dr. King that the organization has voted to demand the release of Dr. King and others from Fulton County Jail. He states that the arrest violates "basic constitutional rights" and that the Council fully supports the fight to end discrimination and segregation in the United States.

Eulogy for Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Victims

This is Dr. King?s eulogy for three of the four young girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. God gives man the right to exercise good and evil, King says, but God wills that everything will happen for the good ? that out of tragedy comes redemption. Martyred in the struggle for freedom, the girls have become symbols of the crusade and of the faith that sustains it. King speaks of forgiving those who murdered the girls and the need to transform the system, the way of life, and the philosophy that led to the bombing.

The Third Level of Ontological Concepts

Dr. King writes notes regarding the third level of ontological concepts, which "expresses the characteristics of being which are conditions of existence."

News from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Thursday, February 9, 1961

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. announces their recent involvement with President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from High School Student Elizabeth L. Andrews to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Elizabeth Andrews, a sophomore at North Hills High School, requests Dr. King's autograph for her class letter writing project.

Letter from Lynn Ewell to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. about Comments on College Course

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter Lynn Ewell inquires as to whether Dr. King will offer any comments pertaining to the college course "Education of the Adolescent" and the class research topic of "Building an Enduring Peace."

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Letter from Robert Birley to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Robert Birley invites Dr. King to give an address at a program in London. Mr. Birley informs Dr. King of the four topics that will be discussed and requests that Dr. King address the topic of racial discrimination.

Letter from James Schlatter to MLK

Friday, December 17, 1965

James E. Schlatter, a student at Illinois State University, writes to Dr. King to request his comment on the effects of civil disobedience on law and order for his term paper on law enforcement.

Guide for Churchmen in Interracial Conflict Situations

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

In this document, the Southern Field Service encourages church leaders to aid in African American social justice mobilization.

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Thursday, May 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Monothelitism

Dr. King outlines the principles of Monothelitism.

Post Card Front from Alice and Jun Hayakawa to Coretta King

The Hayakawa family send this photo greeting to Mrs. King, addressing her as "Corrie." The family expresses their concern for Mrs. King and hopes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King following a recent accident.

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.