Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"NETHERLANDS"

Transubstantiation

Dr. King defines 'transubstantiation', a concept derived from Roman Catholic theology.

Letter from the Interpreters' House to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Carlyle Marney and J. C. Herrin invite Dr. King to attend a conference to discuss the future mission and tasks for American Baptists in the South.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ernest J. Chave's "A Functional Approach to Religious Education."

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Abraham Ribicoff thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and expresses his contentment with the passing of the Civil Rights Bill. Ribicoff hopes for the progression of the nation in providing equal opportunities for all.

Letter from MLK to W. M. Jones

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King writes Bishop W. M. Jones of Israel of God's Church expressing his gratitude for their generous contribution to the SCLC.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

A Minority of One

Thursday, June 1, 1967

In an attempt to enhance positive intergroup relations, Mrs. Porter was interviewed during "inservice education sessions" at a school of nursing. Because Mrs. Porter was "the first and only Negro who had been graduated from" the school, the faculty wanted insight into her experience of integration. Gloria M. Francis wrote this article covering the interview.

Letter from Ernestine Lee to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

A fourteen-year-old child, inspired by Dr. King's speeches, sends a small contribution and a prayer to the King family.

Letter from Richard U. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Rev. Richard Smith expresses his political views on the possible re-election of Adam Clayton Powell. Smith explains to Dr. King and other leaders that to rally for Mr. Powell is to ignore the moral character of man.

Evil (Problem of)

Dr. King discusses the concept of evil.

Letter to Ms. Dora McDonald from Solomon Mendelson

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

Mr. Solomon Mendelson informs the SCLC and Ms. Dora McDonald that CBS will not be televising Dr. King's "I have a Dream Speech."

Cover Letter Draft for MLK's 1967 Pilgrimage to the Holy Land

Sandy F. Ray drafts a cover letter to be enclosed with the packets for Dr. King's 1967 Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Eulogy for Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Victims

This is Dr. King?s eulogy for three of the four young girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. God gives man the right to exercise good and evil, King says, but God wills that everything will happen for the good ? that out of tragedy comes redemption. Martyred in the struggle for freedom, the girls have become symbols of the crusade and of the faith that sustains it. King speaks of forgiving those who murdered the girls and the need to transform the system, the way of life, and the philosophy that led to the bombing.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Letter from the Chester, Pennsylvania Branch of the NAACP to MLK

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

The Chester Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The organizers ask for information about the process to arrange the visit and for a picture to be enclosed with Dr. King's reply.

Executive Staff Meeting of the SCLC

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Dr. King informs the Southern Christian Leadership Conference staff of an executive staff meeting scheduled for June 22, 1967.

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding Commissioner of Commerce

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

In this telegram, Dr. King is informed that his telegram to Katherine C. Peden, Commisioner of Commerce State Office is undelivered.

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

New York Times Graphic: Minority Problems in White Collar Employment

Sunday, January 21, 1968

This graphic from The New York Times shows examples of demographic inequality in white collar jobs.

Letter from MLK to Universal Life Insurance

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr. King expresses appreciation to Universal Life Insurance Company for their generous contribution, and remarks the SCLC is strengthen by the undergirding support of loyal supporters.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

Mississippi Project

The Mississippi Project is developed by SNCC which rooted from the evident white supremacy in this state. The organization sought to take action to eradicate the societal restrictions of the American Negro. The summer project will involve voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, and many more sectional projects.

Letter from Ian Robertson to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

Ian Robertson, President of the National Union of South African Students, writes Dr. King on behalf of the organization. He addresses the lack of acknowledgement to their previous letter and requests a copy and recording of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Ernest M. Bettenson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Ernest M. Bettenson, the Registrar at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, writes Miss McDonald to solidify arrangements for Dr. King's visit to the University. The sender informs Miss McDonald that tradition mandates meal arrangements for the recipient of an honorary degree and outlines several options to assist Dr. King in accommodating this practice.

A Look to the Future

Monday, September 2, 1957

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Bolennart Andersson, President of the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden, sends a congratulatory letter and an invitation to Dr. King to speak to their student union.

Letter from Florence of Scepter Records, Inc. to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

In this letter, Florence thanks Dr. King for his address at the NATRA Convention. She also encloses a contribution to continue the work of the movement.

Letter from Alice Cooper to MLK

Sunday, February 18, 1968

Mrs. Cooper expresses agreement with Dr. King's article in the May 1967 edition of "The Progressive," which discussed the inherit injustice in using "black and white" as names for races. She also sends a copy of an article she wrote that suggests some alternate names.

Plans for Progress: Atlanta Survey

The Southern Regional Council releases a special report regarding Atlanta's "Plans for Progress," a program that gives the President's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity power to require contractors to eliminate discrimination in the workplace. According to a study, only three of the twenty-four firms appeared to be interested in abiding by the "Plans for Progress." These were Lockheed, Western Electric Company, and Goodyear.