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Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.


Dr. King writes notes regarding philosophy, God, and the world. King quotes Dr. Shirley Guthrie, "It is the Lord; let him do what seemeth Him good."

Letter from Pauline Lee to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

Pauline Lee withdraws her support from Dr. King due to his failure to withdraw support for Adam Clayton Powell.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

Friday, January 26, 1968

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Chicago Staff

Wednesday, January 10, 1968

Tom Offenburger writes to the SCLC Chicago Office Staff Steering Committee concerning phone call procedures. Offenburger asserts that answering the phone with "Operation Breadbasket" will not reveal the broader interest of the SCLC, and suggests answering the phone with, "good morning, SCLC."

Letter from Huub Coppens to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 2, 1964

Huub Coppens, Secretary of "The Tribune" in the Netherlands, writes Dora McDonald in hopes of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit their homeland in the near future.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Saturday, July 3, 1965

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

Invitation for the Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

This is an invitation for the Inauguration of the seventh president of Morehouse College.

John Scotus Eriugena

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Scotus Eriugena.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Fern McQuesten at the United Nations Assn of Hawaii

Monday, April 8, 1968

Ms. McQuesten extends condolences to Mrs. King and recalls fond memories of a meeting with Dr. King. She writes, "I met Mr. King many years ago...he will always be beckoning us on to greater achievements for mankind."

Letter from Mark Henderson to MLK

In this letter Mark Henderson comments on the incidents at the South Carolina State College in Orangeburg, South Carolina known as the Orangeburg Massacre.

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

Importance of the Public Accommodations Section of the Civil Rights Bill

This document features a story of a white civil rights worker who was fined and sentence to jail because she sought to eat with her Negro friends in a restaurant in Atlanta.

Notes Regarding Civil Rights Act of 1965

This handwritten note describes the positive effects of the Civil Rights Act for Negroes. According to the notes, "What we have won in blood, toil and sacrifice we will not squander in apathetic complacency."

Letter to MLK from Joan Daves about New Publication

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves reports to Dr. King a proposal for a French edition of "Strength to Love" based on a specified advance and royalty.

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Dr. King informs President Kennedy that he will not be in attendance at a meeting with religious leaders due to another commitment.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, August 23, 1965

This statement from Dr. King?s literary agent reflects monies earned from the German pocketbook edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

Handwritten Notecard regarding "Rule of Faith"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the "Rule of Faith." This is an example of the many notecards Dr.King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Toynbee: List of Twenty-One Societies

Dr. King notes the twenty-one civilizations described in Arnold Toynbee's "A Study of History."

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Mr. Peter Feldman to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

In this letter Peter Feldman, the production manager for WRVR Radio in New York City, requests an interview with Dr. King the day of his sermon at Riverside Church. WRVR feels the interview would be a "significant platform" for his upcoming march on Washington. Dr. King would be assassinated less than a month later.

Hocking's Philosophy of the Human Self

Dr. King cites the journal "The Personalist" on William Ernest Hocking's philosophy of the human self.


Dr. King clarifies the meaning of repentance according to the Old Testament.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Biography of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr

This document presents a biographical sketch of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.