Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"NETHERLANDS"

Letter to MLK from Vice President Hubert Humphrey

Thursday, June 15, 1967

In this letter, U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his support and applauds him for all his hard work, while commenting on fair and decent housing.

Letter from Mrs. Behlen to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

Mrs. Behlen congratulates Ralph Abernathy for the wonderful job he did during the funeral services for Dr. King.

God

Dr. King expounds on points made about the idea of "God," by Immanuel Kant, William James, and W.E. Hocking.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publication Deadlines

Monday, January 30, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves provides feedback on Dr.King's chapter on "Black Power,"and she informs Dr. King that she is waiting for chapters on "White Backlash" and "What It Means to be a Negro in America," for his book "Where do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Critique of the Social Gospel

Dr. King used this outline while studying at Crozer Theological Seminary. The topics listed include: Social Contribution to Christianity, Contribution to Christian Social Philosophy, and the Sore Points of the Social Gospel.

Letter from Robert T. Bowen to MLK

Sunday, January 14, 1968

In this letter, Mr. Bowen requests the assistance of Dr. King in establishing a black nation outside of the United States.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Letter from Geraldine Fothergill to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963

Geraldine Fothergill, a mother of seven of Hartford, Connecticut, offers Dr. King an idea about educating African American youths. She suggests that African American families develop a boarding program to house African American students that are accepted at traditionally white colleges distant from home. She also suggests that Dr. King, as a minister, can convince other ministers to support this program through the churches.

The Miami Herald: Who Threw the Bomb?

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

In this newspaper clipping, "Washington Post" columnist Charles Morgan Jr. argues that the responsibility for the Birmingham bombings lies with the entire community.

Man's Dilemma

Dr. King states that man’s dilemma results from “the divorce of nature from the supernatural.”

The Trinity

Dr. King analyzes Peter Abelard's argument on the interpretation of the Trinity as three attributes of one substance.

Letter from MLK to Adhemar de Barros

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Dr. King declines Governor Adhemar de Barros' invitation to attend the conference for recognition of Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. King's work on the Right-to-Vote Campaign in the State of Alabama has monopolized his time for several months.

Invitation from Susan Rowland to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Susan Rowland invites Dr. King to the University of Western Ontario to give an address during the spring of 1968. During his visit he is expected to speak on the topics of civil rights and the Vietnam conflict. Although these are the areas of focus, Ms. Rowland explains that the exact nature of the talk is up to Dr. King's discretion.

Letter from Adele Fishman to MLK

Monday, August 31, 1964

The American Book Company is requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail." They hope to include the letter, in a text book, entitled THE STREAM OF AMERICAN HISTORY, THIRD Edition. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.

God

Dr. King elaborates on Thomas Aquinas' views on the existence of God.

Letter from MLK to Sr. Joao Carlos Meirelles

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Dr. King informs Sr. Meirelles that prior commitments regarding the Right-to-Vote Campaign in Alabama preclude his ability to attend the conference in Brazil.

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Letter from MLK to Senator Thomas H. Kuchel Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Thomas H. Kuchel's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

God

Dr. King expounds on "the eternality of God" by using the Book of Psalms.

Letter from Edwin Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Edwin Tuller, General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention, discusses an invitation for Dr. King to speak for the Buffalo Baptist Association. He suggests that Dr. King consider accepting the invitation because the association has good attendance from both Negroes and whites.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1961

Mr. Eugene Exman's, expresses disappointment in Dr. King for not having received his manuscript for a forthcoming book of sermons, and urges him to expedite the manuscript.

MLK's Statement on Current Electoral Politics

This is the draft of a statement that Dr. King planned to make, concerning the state of politics in America. Dr. King expresses his disappointment in that "the quality of some of the men elected makes a mockery of responsible government," and urges African-Americans to "lose faith in a shallow 'good will' that provides nothing."

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Letter From MLK to Ben Ari

Friday, September 22, 1967

This letter from Dr. King declines a request to go on a religious pilgrimage to the Holy Land due to turmoil in the Middle East.

Letter to Dorothy Height from Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Dora McDonald apologizes to Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, for not responding sooner to let her know that Dr. and Mrs. King would be unable to attend the Premier Life Membership Dinner. The invitation to the dinner came during Dr. King's sabbatical to write a new book.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

Letter of Support from Vivian Gourevitch to MLK

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

Supporter Vivian Gourevitch writes Dr. King to stress her belief that "Black Power" is a dangerous slogan.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Friday, August 30, 1957

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.