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"NETHERLANDS"

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Beverly A. Asbury

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

In this letter Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rev. Beverly Asbury for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He stresses the importance of supporters' contributions in order to successfully continue the initiative toward unity, justice, and equality.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbert Spencer's views on philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Walter Reuther Remarks at the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Walter P. Reuther, President of the International Union, UAW, expounds upon the cause of freedom and democracy in America from the perception of the external world. Reuther highlights the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and how they have been denied to African Americas living as "second-class" citizens. He further discusses the necessary duties of the United States Congress to recognize and initiate civil rights programs.

Letter from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

In this letter, dated March 6, 1968, Minister Jones urgently requests photostatic copies of letters and newspaper clippings concerning "Jet Cruiser," as well as "Lost Potentials."

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Saturday, June 5, 1965

In this letter, Mr. Dawkins informs Dr. King that the Summer Community Organization and Political Education, S.C.O.P.E., stands to benefit from the involvement of the VISTA organization.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to President Lyndon Johnson

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

A. Philip Randolph, the President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (an AFL-CIO affiliate), writes to President Johnson to urge him to convene a small group of national civil rights leaders to advise local leaders and businessmen on how to deal with the escalation of riots occurring all over the country.

Letter from Mrs. Raymond Gautier and Mrs. Robert Joyner to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963

The President and Secretary of a Seattle benefit guild, an organization consisting of twelve Negro women who seek to "promote unity for the improvement of the community," request a meeting with Dr. King. The benefit guild hopes to sponsor a rally to raise funds for the SCLC. Furthermore they describe the Northwest as a silent "nice nasty."

Letter from W. P. Ketterer to MLK

Monday, November 25, 1963

W. P. Ketterer sends Dr. King a contribution to honor the late President Kennedy. He expresses his hope for other Americans to support Dr. King in his efforts.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Howe Fears Draft Of Too Many Students

This article discusses how Education Commissioner Harold Howe complained to a House Special Education Sub-Committee that more than a third of graduate students could expect to be drafted in the following year due to the changes in the Selective Service law.

Soap, Brush Help

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

People In Action : "Birmingham Part 2"

Saturday, August 17, 1963

Dr. King, along with the SCLC, devises a plan to stop government officials from shutting down public facilities. Dr. King goes on to discuss the racism in Albany and plans to generate peace with the white communities.

Statement by MLK Regarding All-White Jury Trials

Friday, December 3, 1965

Dr. King approves of recent court cases where all-white juries convicted all-white defendants in murder and conspiracy cases. He calls these cases "rays of light and hope," but claims that federal legislation is needed to ensure that discriminatory practices are not involved in impaneling juries.

Report of A Participant

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

Letter from Haakon Knudsen to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964

The Director of Field Activities from American Baptist Convention writes Dr. King to invite him to speak at the upcoming conference for their department.

Fumbling on the New Frontier

Saturday, March 3, 1962

This article critiques the Kennedy Administration's civil rights agenda. Additionally, it outlines Dr. King's view that all presidents should play a pivotal role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Walter Winchell: Man Doing A Column

In part of this edition of his syndicated gossip column, Walter Winchell briefly criticizes SNCC in the irreverent style for which he was known.

Telegram from MLK to William Miller

Friday, February 16, 1968

Dr. King writes Mr. William O. Miller, of the Concerned Teachers and Parents of Philadelphia, commending them for their efforts advocating for African-American education in their community.

Letter Dated 12/4/62 from MLK's Secretary to Melvin Arnold

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Melvin Arnold, Miss Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, informed Mr. Arnold that Dr. King was still working on his sermons for publication. She also stated that Dr. King had a meeting later that afternoon on December 12, 1962 and would like to scheduled a meeting with Rev. Wallis for earlier that day.

Freedom

Here, Dr. King defines freedom.

DeWolf, Harold

Dr. King references Harold DeWolf's book, "A Theology of the Living Church."

Invitation from Manitoba New Democratic Party

Thursday, August 19, 1965

B. Swailes, Provincial Secretary of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, extends a speaking invitation to Dr. King to discuss human rights.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King records teachings of German theologian and philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher that Dr. King feels "make his theology a religious psychology."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding an Offer from Protestant Publishing

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this Letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about an offer from Shinkyo Shuppansha (Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd.). A description of an advancement pay, royalty percentage and number of copies are included in this letter.

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Harold L. Sawyer

Friday, June 26, 1964

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Sawyer that he finds it difficult to schedule appointments more than three months in advance due to his hectic schedule, and cannot accept his invitation to speak at Hiram College at this time.

Letter from Pierre Servais to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Pierre Servais informs Dr. King that his company will publish the French translation for the book "Strength to Love." He congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to be a part of various interviews in Paris and Brussels to promote the book.

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."