Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"NIGERIA"

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm to MLK about a Humanity Button

Friday, March 1, 1968

In this letter Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm enclose a button called the "Pentagon of Humanity," which the Heussenstamm's also sent to the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Accordingly the symbol represents “love, unity and wisdom—the community of man.”

Telegram from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dow Kirkpatrick congratulates Dr. King and apologizes for his absence at the event.

Telegram from Author William Peters to Coretta Scott King Regarding a Book Opportunity

Peters was contracted to co-author the Myrlie Evers book by Random House. Random House then suggested he do the same with Coretta Scott King.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

VFW Post 2156 to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966

The members of George Washington Carver Post VFW Post 2156 voice their support for Dr. King, along with a donation.

Angels

Dr. King writes on angels, according to Daniel 10:13, 21, and 12:1.

The Gibson Report

Monday, April 1, 1968

The Gibson Report illustrates the economic status of employed and unemployed African American women in the U.S. It also compared the incomes of white and black Americans.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965

The secretary of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees writes to Dr. King, enclosing the minutes of their meeting of April 10, 1965.

Letter from Philip E. Jones to MLK

Thursday, October 6, 1966

Philip E. Jones, a SCOPE volunteer, recollects a "terrible night at Canton, Mississippi" where he met Dr. King and was assigned the duty to find Rev. Young. Jones invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights issues at Juniata College where he is enrolled.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Bartley to MLK

Dr. King was sent this telegram from a couple who had recently heard him speak, prior to his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, June 23, 1965

Dr. King writes Mrs. G. Coleman to acknowledge the receipt of her letter inviting him to speak at a Freedom Rally in Beckley, West Virginia. Dr. King expresses his deep regret in his inability to attend.

Apologist

Dr. King cites information regarding the historical background of the Apologists and their role in defending Christianity.

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Friday, April 21, 1967

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio "...to help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

Letter from Prince Johannes of Bohemia to MLK

Sunday, December 17, 1967

Prince Johannes, claimant to the throne of Bohemia, requests Dr. King's participation in the Presidium of the World Government.

Messianic Age (Haggai)

Dr. King makes reference to the Biblical governor Zerubbabel. The specific passage to which Dr. King refers reads, "On that day, says the Lord of Hosts, I will take you Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, my servant, and wear you like a signet ring; for it is you whom I have chosen. This is the word of the Lord of Hosts" (Hag. 2:23).

Letter from Rev. William J. Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 29, 1962

Rev. William J. Shaw, pastor of White Rock Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, contributes $100.00 to the SCLC and their works involving the Civil Rights Movement.

Recommendations Made to Executive Board of Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, May 24, 1956

Dr. King makes recommendations to the Executive Board of Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests developing a monthly newspaper to inform friends of the movement activity and scheduling weekly mass meetings.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Chicago, Illinois

Tuesday, April 30, 1957

This document contains the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon at the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He expresses what can be done and what laws should be passed to make sure others are not further abused.

Telegram from Mrs. J W E Bowen and Mrs. S F Crank to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Mrs. J W E Bowen and Mrs. S F Crank write Dr. King expressing their joy in having a spiritual leader who challenges them to be active in the movement.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Morehouse College Board of Trustees

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays encourages the institution's board of trustee members to participate in the Centennial Convocation platform party. President Mays also encloses a calendar of events for the College's 100th Anniversary week.

Crisis and The Church

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

Letter of Recommendation for Sally Cantor

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Mrs. W. M. Taylor, an English teacher at Grady High School, writes a letter of recommendation on behalf of Sally Cantor, a Russell H. Bull Scholarship applicant.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Ogden R. Reid

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King informs Congressman Reid (R-New York) of the positive impact he left on Negro citizens during his visit to Selma, Alabama.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Mr. Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend a meeting with Dr. K. O. Mbadiwe, former Nigerian Minister, and other Negro leaders in the United States to discuss the increasing conflict in Nigeria.

Letter from Librarian Olive Ann Tamborelle to MLK

Tuesday, October 26, 1965

Olive Ann Tamborelle, Director of the Teaneck Public Library, asks Dr. King to name the book that has had the greatest effect on his life, other than The Bible. She informs him that the information will be used in an exhibit for National Library Week.

Letter from MLK to Canon H. W. Montefiore

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

Dr. King informs Canon H. W. Montefiore of his inability to accept the "gracious" invitation to speak at the University Church in England. Dr. King's commitment to the racial injustices in the United States and new book makes it impossible for him to travel to Cambridge.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Lester Kendel Jackson

Monday, April 30, 1962

Dr. King writes to Dr. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church regarding Dr. Jackson's recent visit to Atlanta. Dr. King offers a heartfelt apology to Dr. Jackson for not meeting with him due to sequence of miscommunications and unavoidable events.

Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.