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MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965
South Africa, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, SPAIN, PORTUGAL, ANGOLA, MOZAMBIQUE, New York, NY, New York (NY), CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, GERMANY, JAPAN

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

Excerpt from MLK's Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King discusses nonviolent resistance and freedom. He further challenges various communities by coining the slogan, "hate is always tragic."

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

GHANA, ISRAEL

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Letter from Illinois High School Student Beth Allen to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

High school student Beth Allen writes Dr. King inquiring about how she can contribute to the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from John Barber and Rev. L. C. Filer to MLK

Albany, GA, Connecticut (CT)

John Barber, President of the New Haven Branch of the NAACP, sends his support to Dr. King while he serves time in Albany County Jail. Barber expresses sympathetic concern and promises to register financial support soon.

SCLC Commemorative Booklet Support Letter from MLK

Dr. King requests financial support for the development of SCLC's 10th Anniversary Commemorative Booklet.

Society

New York (NY)

Dr. King quotes a statement from Charles H. Cooley's "The Social Process," in which Cooley defines society as a living, unified group of processes.

Power

Dr. King cites Karen Horney's "The Neurotic Personality of Our Time.

Letter from Professor Clyde Manschreck to MLK

Sunday, July 7, 1963
Ohio (OH)

Clyde L. Manschreck, a professor of church history at the Methodist Theological School in Ohio, asks permission to include "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in his upcoming collection entitled "History of Christianity from the Reformation to the Present," as well as the letter that inspired it.

City's Leaders Plan Dinner for MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This article announces a banquet to be held to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize award. The banquet is hosted by various leaders in the City of Atlanta.

Letter from Hans-Luder Temmen to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Atlanta, GA, GERMANY

This document contains a request for Dr. King's autograph from Mr. Temmen in Germany.

Letter From Joan Daves to Hermine Popper

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Hermine Popper of an issue regarding writing credit for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here."

Letter from Clarence H. Haines to MLK

Wednesday, August 3, 1966
Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY

Clarence Haines encloses a donation and comments on economic power. Haines suggests a verbal network between Negros so they can learn which stores are integrated and friendly in order to support those business owners.

Chicago Freedom Movement Tent-In

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Illinois (IL)

This flyer outlines the platform for the Chicago Freedom Movement's Tent-In. This organization, based out of Warrenville, Illinois, sought for equality in housing and was an initiative of the SCLC and Al Raby's Council of Federated Organizations.

MLK Schedule for November, 1960

Rhode Island (RI), New York (NY), GHANA, NIGERIA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., London, England

This schedule lists Dr. King's travel itinerary and speaking engagements for November, 1960.

Letter from Rev. Robert E. DuBose, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966
Philadelphia, PA

The Rev. Robert E. DuBose Jr. offers a prayer to Dr. King, after his march in Jackson, Mississippi. Rev. DuBose was not able to attend the march.

Office of Economic Opportunity Application for Community Action Program

This document displays the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee Wilcox County S.C.L.C., Inc. budget. The budget focuses on their Family Development and Family Education Project.

Man

Dr. King notes poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's ideology of man and his capabilities.

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

Sunday, April 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, EGYPT, ISRAEL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Albany, GA

Attorney General Robert Kennedy addresses the prosecutions that involved leaders from the Albany Movement. Kennedy discusses these details and facts of the case with Dr. King.

Letter From MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Friday, February 9, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

This response letter, dated February 9, 1968, was addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

The Freedom Movement and the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 1, 1967
New York (NY)

In this reprint of an article originally printed in the fall of 1965, Professor Robert S. Browne makes a charge to the Department of Defense that the Negro troops were being used in Vietnam in disproportionate numbers. Freedomsways publications re-released the publication due to its remarkably fresh and informative content and high demand.

Man The Christian View

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr’s three ways in which the Christian view of man differs from all others, citing “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Telegram from Joseph Anderson to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Joseph Anderson urges Dr. King to "call forth a day of prayer" to ease the uproar, most notably overshadowing such U.S. cities as Detroit and Newark during the long, hot summer of 1967.

Letter from Mr. John W. Hall to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Hall of Pomona, California shows his support for Dr. King and the SCLC through an ongoing monetary contribution.

Letter from MLK to Clifford P. Case

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Clifford Case, a United States Senator from New Jersey, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Shirley Katzander to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
New York, NY

Shirley Katzander, Director of Promotion for "The Reporter," requests Dr. King's commentary on an article written by Meg Greenfield titled "What is Racial Balance in the Schools?"

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Langone

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Langone due to other writing commitments for the next several months, Dr. King is unable to accept his invitation to write an article for his journal, Psychiatric Opinion.