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Letter from MLK to James L. Hicklin

Monday, February 25, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses gratitude for being considered for a position on the National Board of Governors for the Freedom For All Foundation, but he declines due to commitments to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and other pastoral duties.

Shattered Dreams and Unfulfilled Hopes

SPAIN

Dr. King based this sermon on unfulfilled hopes and dreams. He focused on the story of the Apostle Paul and his wish to journey to Spain. Paul did eventually go to Spain but "as a prisoner and not as a free man." Dr. King told his congregation that they all faced unfulfilled dreams at some point in their lives.

Letter from Eugen Bosch to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Eugen Bosch writes to Dr. King to tell him that, "As always, King was rational and understanding and put the whole thing in the right perspective." Bosch is hopeful that Dr. King will help James Meredith, who had decided to run for Congress in a special election against the incumbent, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa, South Africa

This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.

Letter from MLK to David Bilk

Tuesday, February 7, 1967
London, England

Dr. King apologizes to Mr. Bilk for his tardiness in replying, before telling Mr. Bilk that his schedule is too heavy for him to visit Britain and speak at the universities to which Mr. Bilk has invited him.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

D. McDonald's Response to Melvin Arnold's Letter Dated 11/7/62

Thursday, November 8, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this correspondence to Mr. Melvin Arnold, Miss Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, informed Mr. Arnold that Dr. King was still working on his sermons for publication. She also regretted that Dr. King and Mrs. King would not be available for dinner Sunday, November 18, 1962.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Roy Wilkins sends a message of warm wishes on behalf of the NAACP to Dr. King while he is serving a sentence at the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, February 10, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, contacts Dr. King again about speaking at the organization's annual meeting. She informs Dr. King that she needs a response soon in order to put the information in the newspaper.

Letter from Robert E. Harding, Thomas H. Weddington and Celestine B. Bailey to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967
New York, NY

Robert E. Harding Jr., Thomas H. Weddington, and Celestine B. Bailey detail the many allegations of racial discrimination involving employees from the National Labor Relations Board. These issues have conflicted with the Equal Employment Opportunity and the Civil Service Rules and Regulations. Harding, Weddington, and Bailey request Dr. King's assistance to correct this issue.

Treasury Spells Out Equal Employment Requirements for Banks

Friday, February 17, 1967
Washington, D.C.

This press release details the requirements for compliance with the Treasury Department's Equal Employment regulations.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding the "Times"

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, provided a detailed advertisement schedule for his latest book "Why We Can't Wait." Advertisements appeared in the Times, Harper, The Atlantic, Christian Herald and the Christian Century to name a few.

The Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Storthing

Thursday, January 30, 1964
SWEDEN, INDIA, Stockholm, Sweden, Oslo, Norway

The members of the Swedish Parliament honors Dr. King for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. The Parliament expounds on the prosperous and revolutionary efforts of Dr. King and encourages him to continue the methodology of nonviolence introduced by Mahatma Gandhi. Dr. King is further highlighted for his works in the United States and his contributions to eradicate racial discrimination.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Denver, CO, San Francisco, CA, Arizona (AZ), Texas (TX), Missouri (MO), Pennsylvania (PA), Cincinnati, OH, Cleveland, OH, Norfolk, VA, Richmond, VA

Here, Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, forwards a list of proposed touring cities to Mr. Harry Belafonte. She also comments on a recent special he did entitled, "Laughter."

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes John M. E. McTaggart's "Some Dogmas of Religion."

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet Featuring Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967
New York (NY), California (CA), Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Maine (ME)

This document contains speeches given at the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet. Sidney Poitier, a Bahamian American actor, gives the keynote address. He makes a very compelling statement during his address asserting, "to change the world we must change men." Also featured are brief speeches by Dr. King, Andrew Young, and Dorothy Cotton.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Carl Andrew Moore

Friday, April 26, 1968
California (CA)

Carl Andrew Moore, from the University of the Pacific, in Stockton, California, expresses his support of Rev. Ralph Abernathy's leadership during these trying times.

Letter from Mrs. Sigrid Sharp to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Sharp commends Dr. King for his open opposition to the Vietnam War. She further requests copies of his April 4, 1967 speech before New York's Riverside Church, in order to raise political awareness and garner support against the war effort.

Program From MLK's Nobel Peace Prize Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This is the program from a Recognition Dinner honoring Dr. King sponsored by the Citizens of Atlanta following his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. It took place at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel and included an address by Dr. King.

Sermon Introductions by MLK

Dr. King frames a series of introductions to sermons that includes such selections as Civilization's Great Need, Life Is What You Make It, and Why Religion?

Telegram from Minsters of Operation Breadbasket to Robert E. Slater

Wednesday, November 22, 1967
Boston, MA, Baltimore, MD

The John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company is called to discuss racial discrimination. Ministers from Operation Breadbasket explain that they will commence an investigation to possibly eradicate the unequal employment practices of the company.

Subsidized Housing Project Proposal

Atlanta, GA, Dallas, TX

In this proposal for an Atlanta based housing project for low income families, the terms and conditions are drawn out amongst all organizations involved. These consist of Ebenezer Baptist Charitable Foundation, the Federal Housing Insuring Office, the Housing Authority, the Federal National Mortgage Association, Mauldower and Paterson, Joe Robinson and James S. Robinson. Additionally, Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. and Jr. are described in a brief biography as reference to the leadership involved in the undertaking.

Attitude, Knowledge and Apperception of the Civil Rights in the Puerto Rican Public

PUERTO RICO

E. Seda Bonilla, Ph. D. writes about the acts of discrimination that occur in Puerto Rico. Backed by data, it is said that colored groups are being kept from achieving higher levels of education. In addition, Bonilla observes a correlation between individual occupational rate and individual degree of intolerance.

Adverse Letter from R. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967
San Francisco, CA

R. Johnson writes to Dr. King wishing physical violence against him. The author refers to Dr. King as "Big Mouth."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Montgomery, AL, CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Georgia (GA), Detroit, MI, Geneva, Switzerland, FRANCE, THAILAND, GUATEMALA, COLOMBIA, PERU, VENEZUELA

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Protagoras

Dr. King writes about Protagoras’ view that appearance is reality.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Arthur Flemming

Monday, January 30, 1967
Oregon (OR)

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for Mr. Flemming's contribution to the SCLC. He states that because of the contributors continuing support, the initiatives of the SCLC can persist forward.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Funeral Service for Mrs. Sharon Joann Moss

Saturday, October 10, 1964
Ohio (OH), Detroit, MI, Cincinnati, OH

Sharon Joann Moss, wife of Otis Moss Jr., passes at an early age and is given a funeral service which includes numerous members from the civil rights movement. Dr. King delivered the eulogy for the service and many other prominent members operated as pall bearers.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.