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Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of updates regarding the advertisement of "Why We Can't Wait". Joan Daves also discusses a conversation they previously had on the phone and gives an explanation of her actions.

Letter from San Francisco Vietnam Committee to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

The San Francisco Vietnam Committee invites Dr. King to speak for their anti-Vietnam War rally. Dr. King would begin making statements against the Vietnam War during the fall of 1965.

God

In this note on God's love and faithfulness,Dr. King refers to the Old Testament book of Psalms.

Letter from William H. Chester to MLK

Friday, September 6, 1963
San Francisco, CA, SOUTH AFRICA, California (CA)

William H. Chester writes Dr. King enclosing a donation to the SCLC from Mary Louise Hooper, chairman of the Northern California Committee on African Affairs, on behalf of the San Francisco Church-Labor Conference. The organization conducted a Human Rights Day parade that was broadcast in Africa. Mr. Chester further informs Dr. King that Mrs. Hooper encourages the SCLC to "keep moving forward until victory is achieved."

Wisdom

Dr. King quotes and comments on Proverbs 2:6, saying that wisdom is a supreme virtue for the author of Proverbs and involves moral character and knowledge.

Tidewater Youth Association Invites MLK to Speak

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA)

Edwin Crocker, president of the Tidewater Youth Association, Inc. in Portsmouth, Virginia informs Dr. King of an interest to present him as their forum speaker. A student initiative, the organization strives to improve social, economic, and spiritual conditions of the Negro. The group hopes Dr. King will consider helping the youth fight for racial justice and equality.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959
Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Letter from MLK to Hazel Gregory

Wednesday, July 24, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Dr. King responds to Hazel Gregory's previous correspondence about transportation to the March on Washington. He informs Mrs. Gregory that he is attending a meeting regarding the logistics of the march the next day and will communicate further about a bus from Montgomery to attend the event.

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.

Some Things We Can Do

In this series of note cards entitled "Some Things We Can Do," Dr. King provides several suggestions pertaining to the African American community.

Raphael Gould Thanks MLK For Support

Thursday, July 8, 1965
New York (NY), VIETNAM, Ohio (OH)

Gould thanks Dr. King for his letter of support to the Clergymen's Emergency Committee in Vietnam. Gould further approves of King's dialogue printed in Playboy Magazine and encourages him to go on late night TV interview shows to reach a larger population of Americans.

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Letter from H.M. Arrowsmith to MLK

AUSTRALIA, London, England, UNITED KINGDOM, New York (NY), New York, NY, PAPUA NEW GUINEA

General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Australia, Canon H. M. Arrowsmith, M.B.E., extends Dr. King an official invitation to visit Australia in May 1967. It is the Society's hope that Dr. King's trip will focus primarily on the role of the Bible in relation to the "stature and the status of Man" and the "question of racial equality" throughout the world.

Letter from Stacey McCloud to MLK

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

Stacey McCloud writes to Dr. King suggesting that he, Stokley Carmichael and others relocate to Africa and march.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes the French philosopher Rene Descartes on the concept of "doubt."

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1961
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Mr. Eugene Exman's, expresses disappointment in Dr. King for not having received his manuscript for a forthcoming book of sermons, and urges him to expedite the manuscript.

Worship (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "Methods of Private Religious Living."

MLK Confidential Memorandum

Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA), New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King outlines the SCLC's direct action program for the communities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery.

Letter from Stephen Harris to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
VIETNAM

Numerous riots have occurred at Marble Mountain Air Base in Vietnam due to mounting racial tensions. Stephen Harris, of the United States Marine Corps, writes to Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael addressing his frustration and the concerns of many Negro servicemen stationed there.

MLK Note Card - "Paint"

In this note card, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints on "...shin[ing] only for the life of imitative mediocrity."

Ordained by God

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King for his proposed hypocrisy. The author contends that violence and law breaking are ungodly behaviors and therefore should not be associated with the peace movement that Dr. King endorses.

Letter from George E. Riddick to MLK

Wednesday, July 8, 1964
Chicago, IL

Mr. Riddick writes to Dr. King and thanks him for speaking at Soldier Field. He expresses the support of the Illinois community for Dr. King's ministry on behalf of Civil Rights.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK

Thursday, November 17, 1966
Chicago, IL, California (CA), VIETNAM

Mr. Sandperl writes to Dr. King regarding the direction of the SCLC. He suggest that the SCLC continue to represent social change and uphold the principles of nonviolence. However, in order to succeed, Mr. Sandperl believes that it should be done from a universal view, instead of from a Negro perspective.

Letter from A.M. Davis to Mr. James Parham Regarding Emory Case

Monday, October 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

A. M. Davis, President of the NAACP's Atlanta Branch, wrote this letter as part of an Atlanta Medical Association complaint against Emory University.

Letter from Laurie Bush to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
New York (NY)

Laurie Bush writes to Dr. King requesting information about the Civil Rights Movement for his or her research paper.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Tuesday, August 3, 1965
New York, NY, PUERTO RICO

This letter addressed to Dr. King highlights travel arrangements to a World Convention of Churches of Christ hosted in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Letter from MLK to The People of Japan

Wednesday, December 13, 1967
JAPAN

Dr. King writes an encouraging letter to the people of Japan expressing his wishes to visit their country sometime soon.

Statement from MLK Returning from Receiving Nobel Prize

Friday, December 18, 1964
New York, NY

Upon returning from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King issued this statement on segregation, calling it "nothing but a new form of slavery."