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Cause, Error and Law

Dr. King quotes from Alfred North Whitehead's The Concept of Nature.

Grand Hotel Reservation for MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Oslo, Norway

This reservation request was sent to Grand Hotel to establish accommodations for Dr. King and his associates during the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies. One of the drafts of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech was scripted on Grand Hotel stationary.

Letter from John A. Clark to MLK Regarding Scriptures, Spiritual Advice and Prayer

Friday, June 9, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

In this letter, Reverend John A. Clark provides spiritual advice, scripture and prayer for Dr. King during hard times as well as for preparation of the future. Reverend John A. Clark also mentions starting a revival and revisiting Washington to D.C. to preach for a cause.

Letter from Dan Aldridge to MLK

Monday, December 23, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Dan A. Aldridge, President of the Foundation Life Insurance Company, recalls a previous visit to Dr. King's home. Aldridge requests an appointment with Dr. King to discuss several important business matters.

Letter from Nile Magazine to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Charles Harris informs Dora McDonald about NIle's interest in endorsing a King/Spock political ticket and organizing a successful campaign for Dr. King and Dr. Spock.

Letter from Bible Student to MLK

ISRAEL

The bible student who wrote this letter used biblical references to justify segregation and to persuade Dr. King to cease civil rights demonstrations.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

Senator Kenneth B. Keating responds to Dr. King's previous message by providing him with a copy of a statement he delivered before the Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Corbett

Tuesday, January 25, 1966
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King thanks Miss Corbett for her message regarding the SCLC Chicago Campaign. He agrees with Miss Corbett's view that the current Negro dilemma is rooted in multiple causes. He also discusses standards of living, economic conditions and society as a whole.

David Williams asks MLK to Visit Community Center

Friday, January 12, 1968
Kansas (KS)

David A. Williams writes to Dr.King asking him to visit the local community center while on his trip to speak at the college in Manhattan, Kansas. He explains some of the trouble the local community is facing, such as a proposed highway that would disrupt his neighborhood and community center, as well as housing discrimination.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Crawford Johnson

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
FRANCE

Dr. King expresses thanks to Mr. Johnson for the international support as demonstrated by the success of the recent Palais des Sports benefit. MLK goes on to elaborate on the impact of "friends of the Movement" in far away places such as Europe.

Letter from Gloria Fraction to Andrew Young

Tuesday, July 5, 1966
Chicago, IL

Gloria Fraction tells Andrew Young that the National Merit Scholarship Corporation has invited Dr. King and Mrs. King to attend an honorary dinner for the most outstanding Negro students.

Letter from Benjamin Brown to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Benjamin Brown, literary editor for CORE, thanks Dr. King for his previous letter regarding the "CORE Guide" publication. Brown asks that CORE be granted permission to reprint copies of Dr. King's past speeches.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Greenwood, MS, Memphis, TN, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), New Hampshire (NH), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, July 2, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

Letter from Richard Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
Minnesota (MN)

Richard Bennett requests a letter of greeting from Dr. King to be read at the Minnesota Federation of Teachers Educational Conference.

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK about CORE National Convention

Thursday, June 11, 1964
New York, NY

This response letter dated June 11, 1964, was sent from Ms. McDonald, secretary of Dr. King to Mr. James Farmer. She states that while Dr. King will not be able to attend the CORE National Convention, he will send a representative from the SCLC to the meeting.

Letter to MLK Regarding Support and Donation

Saturday, September 27, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

A New York couple and their 9 year old son, mailed Dr. King this get well letter praying for his recovery and saluting him for his work.

MLK Draft Text Retrieved by T.D. Johnston

Alabama (AL), INDIA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA, Montgomery, AL, Jackson, MS

The document is a dedication from T. D. Johnston of Huntsville, Alabama to the King Center. Mr. Johnston acknowledges being on an Eastern Airline plane with Dr. King in 1961, where he noticed that Dr. King tossed a speech text that he found. He decided to hold on to the document for preservation and donated it to the King Center. Martin Luther King, III received the document on behalf of the King Center.

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

Wednesday, April 24, 1963
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

Letter from Dr. D. F. Harris to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C., Norfolk, VA, Richmond, VA

Dr. D. F. Harris asks Dr. King if he can participate in the upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He gives Dr. King the names of people who can be contacted for information about his background, including Dr. Milton Reid, pastor of the New Calvary Baptist Church in Norfolk, Virginia.

Letter from MLK to Jacob Nolde

Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King discusses with Jacob Nolde the importance of nonviolent peace movements and the malady of the Vietnam War. He stresses that these nonviolent actions should be exercised internationally and America should cease its desire to maintain wide-spread military control.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Washington, D.C., Indiana (IN), Birmingham, AL

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

Letter fom Edmond Jansson to the Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee

Wednesday, July 24, 1963
Washington (WA), Utah (UT), Chicago, IL

Edmond Jansson writes a letter to the members of the Senate Judiciary Committee contradicting a report on how Roy Wilkins was treated in Salt Lake City, Utah. A copy was sent to Dr. King.

Letter from Rowland Koefod to MLK Regarding "Stride Towards Freedom"

Tuesday, February 21, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Mr. Koefod requests permission to reproduce a one page of manuscript from Dr. King's "Stride Towards Freedom," for a special issue of Boston University's alumni magazine.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Chicago, IL

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack H. O'Dell

Wednesday, July 3, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, New Orleans, LA

In response to recent allegations, Dr. King and members of the SCLC Administrative Committee conduct a formal investigation on Mr. O'Dell's reported association with Communist affiliates. Dr. King regrettably informs him that due to this speculation, despite lack of concrete results, he must permanently resign from his position with the SCLC's New York office.

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.