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"NORTH KOREA"

Letter from Senator Birch Bayh to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Indiana Senator Birch Bayh thanks Dr. King for his note supporting Bayh's vote in favor of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Bayh also thanks Dr. King for his concern regarding Bayh and his wife's recent accident. He includes a handwritten postscript in which he mentions the hope of meeting Dr. King in person.

MLK Statement on Book by Salk

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. King writes a statement on a book by Jonas Salk and discusses the significance of his contribution. Dr. King expresses that Mr. Salk's book highlights one of the most damaging consequences of slavery in the eradication of the meaning, history, and identity of the Negro.

Telegram from MLK to Derhanov Dinke

Dr. King informs Ambassador Derhanov Dinke that it is his pleasure to serve as Honorary President for the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He invites Ambassador Dinke to attend a luncheon at the Sheraton Carlton Hotel in Washington, D. C.

Letter from President Johnson to Robert W. Gilmore

Wednesday, August 9, 1967

President Johnson writes Robert Gilmore regarding the "Democratic Action in South Vietnam" statement of the Center for War/Peace Studies. Johnson assures him that the U.S. government shares his concern for the development of democracy in Vietnam.

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

The Student Mobilizer: Build Vietnam Week!

Focusing on the Vietnam War, this issue of The Student Mobilizer covers topics concerning student mobilizations to protest the war, regional meetings, and the organization of a Vietnam Week to help drum up public support and awareness.

Reason

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "The Finding of God."

Letter from James E. Orange to MLK

Rev. Andrew Young advises Rev. James Orange to contact Dr. King about a salary increase. As a member of the SCLC, Rev. Orange is assigned a project in Philadelphia and desires to avoid financial issues.

L. Seyler's Report on Emil Brunner

L. Seyler from Christian Social Philosophy at Crozer Theological Seminary writes this paper on Emil Brunner, Swiss Protestant theologian. Written around February 20 - May 4, 1951, the paper contains subject matter regarding the crisis of contemporary culture.

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

Saturday, November 24, 1962

Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

Looking Forward: The Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc.

This pamphlet outlines the ten points the Montgomery Improvement Association uses to promote healthy race relations.

The Pastor and His Reference Library

Here is "The Pastor and His Reference Library" by Edward C. Starr. Starr served as librarian at Bucknell. Dr. King more than likely used this resource to conduct research and organize citations while attending Crozer Theological Seminary in Upland, PA.

Cities and Dates Suggested For Harry Belafonte's Tour

These notes compile a list of suggested cities and possible dates for Harry Belafonte's tour.

Letter from British High School Student to MLK

Margaret Blenkins, a fifteen year old student from Northumberland, England, writes Dr. King to ask how she can join the Civil Rights Movement.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Letter from Morton M. Brooks to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Morton Brooks writes Dr. King to check his availability for April, May, or June of 1965 to speak at Mt. Zion's Sunday morning church service. Brooks expresses that he is aware of Dr. King's busy schedule, but would appreciate his consideration.

Get Well Message to MLK from the Anderson Family

The Anderson family wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery and informs him of a recent meeting with Rev. Kelley.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Rosen to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Mrs. Samuel Rosen writes Dr. King recollecting when she marched with him in Montgomery. Rosen states that she and her husband are proud of Dr. King and his works regarding the Vietnam War.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Letter to Mrs. King from Jose Nieto

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from the Pacifist Crusade "John XXIII" to MLK

Sunday, April 11, 1965

Members of the Pacifist Crusade of Argentina extend support to Dr. King in his quest for peace. The group explains the background of the organization and express their goal of world peace through reconciliation.

Proposal for Black Independence

Al Shabazz writes up a program for Black independence. The proposal suggests two program options for leaders to choose from. Once the program has been decided the leader would go out and gather the opinion of the masses. Next, the program would implement unconventional education along with employment and survival skills. The program also promotes an independent nation with alliances from those of all races. The program promotes black revolution and the demise of the elite White Supremacist.

Hus, John

Dr. King makes biographical notes about John Hus, the leader of the Czech reform.

Letter From David O'Brien to MLK

Sunday, February 13, 1966

In this letter, David O'Brien expresses his discord with some of Dr. King's civil rights tactics in Chicago.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Event Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This program outlines the events for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C.

Letter from MLK to Alan Bible

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Alan Bible, a United States Senator from Nevada, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Omar Burleson to MLK

Tuesday, September 14, 1965

In response to a previous telegram, Omar Burleson, Chairman of the Eighty-Ninth Congress, writes Dr. King to assure him that proper consideration is being given in the Mississippi Congress Delegation.

Letter from MLK to Thomas R. Jones

Monday, July 29, 1963

Dr. King thanks the Honorable Thomas R. Jones for his financial and moral support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Dora McDonald and MLK to the United Federation of Teachers

Thursday, November 10, 1966

Dr. King congrats the United Federation of Teachers AFL- CIO on their Fifteenth Anniversary of serving school children.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

Sunday, April 9, 1967

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.