Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"NORTH KOREA"

Letter From T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Saturday, December 24, 1966

T. K. Mahadevan, a representative of the Gandhi Peace Foundation, writes Dr. King regarding an upcoming visit to the United States. Some primary interests during his visit includes meeting key Negro leaders, spending time with an average Negro family, and perhaps a few speaking engagements.

Letter from Washington University to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Faculty of the Political Science Department at Washington University release a resolution supporting Dr. King and his efforts to secure voting rights for Negroes in Selma, Alabama. They urge the Federal Government to take a serious look at this issue following recent attacks upon Negroes trying to exercise their right to vote.

Harper & Row, Publishers Invoice

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King for the shipment of ten copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Schleiermacher (The Religious Man)

Dr. King quotes Schleiermacher's views on man's identification with Religion.

Ex-West Sider

The author discusses their experiences with living in substandard housing in a low socioeconomic environment. The author also questions the racial focus of Chicago's appeasement to the Negro.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Charles W. Englehard

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Harry Wachtel writes Charles Englehard thanking him for his payment of $5,000 toward a $15,000 pledge to The American Foundation On Nonviolence. He states that his initial contribution was extremely helpful in registering African Americans in Mississippi and other southern states.

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Letter from M. Emelene Wishart to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

M. Emelene Wishart is concerned that Dr. King is weakening the fight for civil rights by campaigning to end the Vietnam War. Wishart asks Dr. King if he is attempting to "embarrass the US administration or beat Carmichael in the civil disobedience game."

More State Funds Urged for Negro Banks

Monday, January 23, 1967

This article reports about Operation Breadbasket's request for more funding from the State of Illinois to further its economic development efforts in the African American community.

Letter from Frederick B. Hewitt to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

Rev. Frederick Hewitt of Grace United Church writes Dr. King inviting him to visit the Thousand Islands for a combination of preaching with summer vacation.

History: Voltaire

Dr. King references a quote from the philosopher and historian Voltaire.

Letter from Frank McRedmond to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Frank McRedmond suggests that Dr. King consider using the term "the economic defenseless" rather than "the poor," in order to gain support from the white community.

Letter from Bernard LaFayette, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

Before Mr. LaFayette leaves for New York to join the Spring Mobilization to end the war in Vietnam, he offer suggestions towards the housing problems that have occurred in Chicago. He states that there should be an urban renewal project that could possibly help low-income citizens afford respectable housing.

MLK's Column on Jackie Robinson's Induction in Hall of Fame

Saturday, August 4, 1962

In this column from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King echoes his speech at the induction of Jackie Robinson into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Robinson not only broke the color barrier in major league baseball, MLK points out, he succeeded in business. MLK lauds Robinson's truth-telling as he spoke out against discrimination in the north and south, by whites and blacks, and on racial and religious grounds.

Letter from Wayne Blanks to MLK

Wayne Blanks writes Dr. King in hopes that he will answer a question about the specific goals and standards he sets for Negroes in the US. Blanks is requesting this information for his advanced placement history assignment.

A Manual for Direct Action

In this foreword Bayard Rustin provides an introduction into the rules and tips involved in nonviolent action concerning protests. Mr. Rustin describes nonviolent methods that people can use when encountering dangerous or difficult situations.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

Letter from Anne Braden to A.D. King

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Joe Mulloy will be highlighted in a set of galley proofs for a story in the February issue of The Southern Patriot. Anne Braden informs Reverend A.D. King of the induction refusal by Mr. Mulloy and how it correlates to many SCLC staff members. Mrs. Braden is sending the letter to Dr. King as well and hopes that Rev. A.D. King will participate in this action.

Letter From Joseph Livingston to MLK Regarding Receipt of Letter

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Here Joseph Livingston beckons Dr. King to confirm receipt of a letter sent in reference to what he describes as "a matter of Life and Death".

Criticism of MLK's Methods

Thursday, August 24, 1967

The Author of this letter is very critical of Dr. King and accuses him of hating the white race and requests he return the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Daniel B. Brewster writes Dr. King to thank him for urging his support for the elimination of the poll tax.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for making a visit, in reference to his book. Ms. Daves mentions the positive reactions from the audience and how she believes that their positive feedback will make for a good start of the book.

Stop the War Bring the Troops Home

This brochure advertises a program to rally the support for eradicating the United States influence in Vietnam. It is distributed by The October Mobilisation, an Australian initiative responding to a call for international protest of the Vietnam War.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Thursday, February 18, 1960

Dr. King's business partner writes to him from the Midtown Office in New York regarding a column in which they are working on. His partner assures Dr. King that the column will be successful and discusses future plans and events to help fund raise and raise awareness about the it.

Telegram from Agnes Milthers to MLK

Friday, October 16, 1964

Agnes Milthers, a member of the Danish sections of Women International League for Peace and Freedom, invites Dr. King to speak in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Letter from Adam C. Powell to MLK

Tuesday, November 16, 1965

Minister Powell commends Dr. King on his recent message at the 157th Anniversary of Abyssinian Baptist Church. He also encloses a donation to the SCLC.

MLK on Student Sit-Ins

Friday, April 15, 1960

Dr. King applauds the students participating in sit-in demonstrations and states that the leaders must develop a strategy for victory. He suggests topics for discussion including: creating an organization, a nationwide selective buying campaign, training for jail not bail, further exploration of nonviolence, and taking the freedom struggle into every community without exception. These suggestions led to the formation of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.