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"NORTH KOREA"

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

The Lynching Tree

Jerry Peace writes the poem "The Lynching Tree" which illustrates the pain involved with lynching black people.

Folder

The folder, shown here, contained a sermon of Dr. King entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians." This address was one of Dr. King's well-known sermons.

Statement by Floyd McKissick

This is information sheet is about the National Director of CORE, Floyd McKissick's statement on the Vietnam's War. In addition to other topics, he is scheduled to discuss the immorality of the conflict by drawing "parallels between self determination for the people of Vietnam and the quest for equality for Black Americans."

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

Letter from MLK to Eleanor Martin

Friday, October 11, 1963

Dr. King thanks Ms. Martin for her recent letter, in which she praised his book, "Strength to Love." He also informs her that he will happily accept her invitation to visit her Sunday school class if he has the opportunity.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Appeal to the President of the United States

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

Sin

Dr. King interprets Leviticus 4:3, a verse which implies that a community can incur guilt for the sins of its high priest.

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."

Letter from the Dutch Vietnam Committee to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967

An unknown author writes Dr. King on behalf of the Dutch Vietnam Committee to seek assistance in stopping the bombing in Vietnam. The committee requests Dr. King record a few powerful remarks which will hopefully influence ending the war.

Isaiah

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

Letter from Alan S. Traugott to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Mr. Traugott contributes a check to SCLC indicating his grateful endorsement of Dr. King's position on civil rights and peace.

Letter from Robert J. McCraken to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

Reverend McCracken extends an invitation to Dr. King to preach at The Riverside Church in New York.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

Southern Leaders Conference letter to Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957

Ministers meeting at the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration co-signed this letter to Pres. Eisenhower.

Letter from Richard L. Doerschuk to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Deputy director of the United States Information Agency, Richard Doerschuk requests that Dr. King participate in a television program to be broadcast in Africa on the topic of civil rights.

Telegram from Artis Abrham to MLK

Friday, March 11, 1966

Artis Abrham asks Dr. King's assistance regarding the Freedom Festival. Abrham reports that he has delivered posters and sold tickets to the festival, but the financial secretary still wants him to purchase his own ticket to attend the event.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise

Friday, October 4, 1963

Dora McDonald writes to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise to inform them of a transfer of funds to the intended recipient.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jessie Stephens

Wednesday, September 16, 1964

Miss McDonald informs Jessie Stephens that Dr. King is out of the country, but she recommends that Mrs. Stephens contact Dr. King's lawyer, Chauncey Eskridge, for help.

God

Dr. King quotes Donald M. Baillie's "God Was in Christ."

Ethics

Dr. King quotes a scripture from the book of Psalms discussing ethics.

SCLC Duties

This document outlines general responsibilities and specific duties of SCLC officers. Top level members listed include Dr. King, President, Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to President, Andrew Young, Program Director, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, Office Manager and Educational Consultant, and Ralph Abernathy, Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The document states that Dr. King's general responsibility as President is to "coordinate and interpret the total program of SCLC."

Letter from Mrs. William Henry Slakey to MLK

Mrs. Slakey writes Dr. King to commend his letter denouncing the term "Black Power." In the post script, she requests a personal response instead of a form letter.

Statement by MLK on Jailings

Thursday, May 9, 1963

Dr. King states that there have been blatant violations of constitutional principles in the arresting of nonviolent protesters. He further states that those incarcerated have been subject to beatings.

Statement on the Indictment of MLK

Thursday, March 3, 1960

The "Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr." issued this statement, accusing the state of Alabama of falsely distorting Dr. King's 1958 income tax return in an attempt to indict him.

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Friday, August 23, 1963

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

Letter from L. H. R. Rasmussen to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

The author agrees with Dr. King's political stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The "dignity of man" is highlighted as it serves a great importance to the principles of the Civil Rights Movement and the war. The author affirms Dr. King's support from other peace organizations and political parties.

American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief

Monday, December 4, 1967

The American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief requests that Dr. King join them in sending medical supplies to North Vietnam. They also explain the difficulties they are receiving from the government to obtain a Treasury Department License which would enable them to assist in the war relief. Lastly, the committee informs Dr. King of how other churches have made generous contributions to help with relief for the Vietnam War.