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"NORTH KOREA"

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Field Staff

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Tom Offenburger released this memo to members of SCLC's field staff concerning the advertisement of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Hubert Reaves to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

As an inmate in Jackson, Michigan, Hubert Reaves writes Dr. King to express his interest in the SCLC, and inform him of his future education in ministry at the Detroit Bible College. Mr. Reaves also includes a letter to Mr. Goodall inquiring about his inmate account and the sending of his letters.

State of New York Civil Rights Bureau - 1967 Annual Report

This is the overview of the advancements and achievements affiliated with the New York Civil Rights Bureau, in 1967.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

Letter from MLK to William A. Bennett Jr.

Tuesday, January 18, 1966

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Bennett in which Bennett suggested the phrase "dark skinned American" be used to describe African Americans. Dr. King discusses the connotations of the hateful words "deeply rooted in the debilitating racist caste ordering of our society's slavery epoch and segregation era."

Letter From Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Publication Date of the German Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, May 22, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the desire of the German publishers to have a publication date. Joan Daves also inquires if Dr. King has free time for Mayor Brandt.

Bible

Dr. King compares the views of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Friedrich Schleiermacher on the Christian Bible.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bouwman

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Madame Bouwman for the enjoyable interview conducted in Holland. Dr. King states he will be returning to Holland in July of 1966 and would be interested in meeting again.

Letter from Robert Finarelli to MLK

Wednesday, October 30, 1963

The staff of Edwin H. Vare Junior High School contributes to the SCLC "in remembrance of the Birmingham children who were victims of hate."

Spring Mobilization Committee Information Sheets

These information sheets concern the Spring Mobilization Committee's rally taking place within the United Nations. Topics discussed include meals, housing, and child safety.

Letter from Vivian Washington to MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Vivian E. Washington requests that Dr. King, who is recovering in a Harlem Hospital, review her publication "Mount Ascutney" and provide her with feedback.

Letter from Rev. David Bentley to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Rev. David Bentley, resident and missionary from Amman, writes Dr. King inviting him to visit Jordan. Bentley wants Dr. King to see the displacement and maltreatment of the citizens of Jordan.

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Birmingham Manifesto

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Edna R. McKinnon

Wednesday, December 20, 1967

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Edna McKinnon expressing deep appreciation for her generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He continues to say that the work of the organization is strengthened by such support.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. King to Mrs. A. B. Cooper & Family

Dr. and Mrs. King express their regret for being unable to attend the funeral; however, they offer condolences to Mrs. A. B. Cooper and family for the loss of their loved one.

Telegram from Charles Evers to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

This telegram, from board members of MAP, expresses their dissatisfaction with Dr. King's comments regarding refunding efforts of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Letter from Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration to Henry Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration request a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss the federal government's plans.

Letter from Christa Beer to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965

Christa Beer, a student at the English Institute of Frederick-Schiller University of Jena in East Germany, informs Dr. King that she is writing her final paper on his works in civil rights. She explains the lack of resources at her university and asks that he send her information to aid her in her research.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Fielder

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Dr. Fielder for sending two poems and reminds him of the necessity of seeking peace through non-violence.

Letter from Effie Wilderson to MLK

Mrs. Wilderson writes to Dr. King informing him that the white Christian Church is in support of non-violence and equality for the Negro people.

News Clipping Pertaining to Job Corp March

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

The article references a series of hostile altercations between the trainees at a local Job Corps and the residents of Battle Creek.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to the first chapter of the Old Testament book, Nahum.

"Negro Leader Looks Down Road Ahead"

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Augusta Chronicle wrote this extensive review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this document, the review places special emphasis on Dr. King's views on the War on Poverty, the Black Power Movement and the state of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter Requesting Help From MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

An unidentified North Carolina man writes Dr. King requesting urgent assistance involving his brutal arrest by a state trooper. According to the man, the trooper physically assaulted him during detainment and ended up breaking two ribs. However, his other peers, mainly Negro, are too afraid to speak up about this police brutality case.

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

Saturday, February 18, 1967

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

Telegram to MLK from Harold E. Fey with The Christian Century

Tuesday, March 6, 1956

In this letter, Harold Fey empathizes with Dr. King and his struggle in the fight against injustice. He offers words of encouragement and to continue the ongoing battle.

Our Struggle

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

A Program for the Public Meeting at Metropolitan Baptist Church

Thursday, September 27, 1962

This program outlines a two-day Public Meeting sponsored by the SCLC at Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King was scheduled to deliver the key address.