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Letter to MLK from Ida Kinney

California (CA), Mississippi (MS)

Ida Kinney sends Dr. King a letter expressing her support for his work. She informs him that she would like to begin making monthly financial donations toward the movement.

Judaism

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to Pope Pius XII.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Givan to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Givan urge Dr. King to become a televised preacher, citing a lack thereof and the need for someone to combine the "social gospel" with the Christian fundamentals.

Letter from Sharon J. Brown to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Sharon Brown, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King how his congregation worships. She explains that this question is for a class project.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Job, Ecclesiastes and Daniel

Dr. King quotes several scriptures from the biblical Books of Job, Ecclesiastes and Daniel concerning each author's views on mortality and immortality.

Religious Education

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

God

Dr. King references God and quotes theologian Paul Tillich from "Systematic Theology: Reason and Revelation."

King Calls for Anti-War Referendum

Friday, August 4, 1967
VIETNAM, Michigan (MI), San Francisco, CA, Berkeley, CA, Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), Cambridge, MA, Wisconsin (WI), Detroit, MI, Massachusetts (MA), Illinois (IL)

Dr. King announces a nationwide campaign to give Americans an opportunity to vote on the Vietnam War. He explains that the local initiative is a unique and dramatic way for the people to deliver their mandate against the war.

Letter from Artist Sidney Gordon Budnick to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966
California (CA), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Sidney Gordon Budnick, architect and artist, gifts Dr. King with a piece of art work and applauds Dr. King's "efforts to bring to life the brotherhood of God and of man."

Telegram Plea to Dr. King

Friday, March 29, 1968
California (CA)

An American citizen writes Dr. King pleading for him not to blame whites for all of the misunderstandings in the US.

Letter from MLK to SCLC Action Committee

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King reminds members of the Action Committee of their upcoming meeting. He requests that each member come prepared to "make a report on [their] category of activity concerning the Washington Mobilization."

God (His Infinity)

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the finite and infinite.

Dr. King on Vietnam: Demagogic Tactics

VIETNAM

Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall critiques Dr. King's Vietnam stance and asserts that Dr. King's position undermines his work and credibility as a civil rights leader.

Letter from John and Enid Howarth to Friends Soliciting Financial Support

Sunday, June 26, 1966
New Mexico (NM), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Mr. and Mrs. Howarth of New Mexico express their disapproval of violence against Negroes in the South and request donations for a Fourth of July celebration in support of SCLC, SNCC and other civil rights groups.

Judaism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Joseph Klausner's book "From Jesus to Paul" regarding Judaism. Joseph Klausner was a Jewish historian.

Handwritten Letter from MLK to Dr. Westin

Dr. King writes to decline the invitation of Dr. Alan F. Westin to serve on the Honorary Advisory Board of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties at Columbia University. He cites the urgent demands on his time by the civil rights movement as his reason.

Introduction of MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

These notes are from an introduction written about Dr. King and presumably delivered before he gave an address. Dr. King, who remains unnamed, is presented as a man whose record precedes him given that his life and work has had so profound an impact upon his time.

Standing By The Best in an Evil Time" E

Sunday, August 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this sermon, Dr. King addresses the evil in the world and suggest to his congregation that they counter this by being strong and steadfast in the Lord. Dr. King also touches on the current issues in society and how to continue the use of nonviolence as means to for peace and social justice.

Post Card to MLK from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College

Monday, September 12, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This 1966 post card from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College, is a thank-you note to Dr. King and "the Morehouse men" who made alumni contributions.

Letter Regarding the Distribution of Pilgrimage Folders

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Sandy F. Ray thanks Andrew Young for speaking to his parishioners. Reverend Ray also requests information regarding the distribution of the Pilgrimage Folders, in preparation for the mass pilgrimage Dr. King was planning to lead to Israel and Jordan.

Letter to MLK from Vice President Hubert Humphrey

Thursday, June 15, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his support and applauds him for all his hard work, while commenting on fair and decent housing.

Letter from Henry H. Arrington to Paul Whelehon about P. Ballantine & Sons Employment of Negroes

Thursday, January 12, 1967
Florida (FL), New Jersey (NJ)

The letter references letters between Arrington and John Farrell, regarding the employment of a Negro representative. Mr. Kiah Sayles, a representative of P. Ballantine & Sons, explained that P. Ballantine & Sons was the first company to hire Negro models which elevated Negroes in executive positions. Sayles went on to explain the liberal hiring policy of Coyle Beverage, a distributor of P. Ballantine and Sons.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

Monday, March 4, 1968
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), VIETNAM, Selma, AL

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

Letter from the Weyburn Chamber of Commerce to MLK

Saturday, March 20, 1965
New York, NY, CANADA

The Weyburn Chamber of Commerce, a Canadian organization, is partaking in the various events surrounding the 60th founding anniversary of the Province of Saskatchewan. The chamber commends Dr. King as a Nobel Peace Prize winner and aspires to have him visit to discuss the racial issues in America.

The Purpose of the State

Dr. King records some thoughts on the functions of the state.

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966
New York (NY), ITALY, ISRAEL

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Tuskegee, AL, Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."