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Letter Requesting Help From MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

An unidentified North Carolina man writes Dr. King requesting urgent assistance involving his brutal arrest by a state trooper. According to the man, the trooper physically assaulted him during detainment and ended up breaking two ribs. However, his other peers, mainly Negro, are too afraid to speak up about this police brutality case.

Letter from James W. Kelly to MLK

Thursday, October 17, 1963

James W. Kelly, Director of Chaplains Division, writes Dr. King inviting him to a Supervisory Chaplains Conference headed by the Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy. Kelly states that the conference is a rededication of service to God and his people in the military. Kelly closes by stating, "Your Cooperation will be a great contribution to the cause of religion in the United States Navy and Marine Corps and to their clergymen in uniform."

Letter from Mrs. Emma Hines to MLK

Mrs. Emma Hines offers her moral and financial support to Dr. King. As a 78 year old woman, she will not be able to join King in his march, however, states that she has some young people that might be joining.

Letter from Dora McDonald to F. Newton Miller

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

In Dr. King's absence, Dora McDonald writes F. Newton Miller concerning Dr. King's appearance in Rockville Centre on February 21. McDonald encloses a copy of a letter sent to Mrs. Rose R. Silvers of the Rockville Centre Commission to clarify the misunderstanding.

Letter From Philip S. Riggs to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, Philip Riggs writes to express his difference of opinion with Dr. King regarding the treatment of House Representative Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Saturday, April 29, 1967

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

The Negro Speaks

Several prominent African Americans describe the issues that plague the black community. Some of these issues include poverty, segregation, civil rights and race relations.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Contracts

Friday, January 29, 1965

In this letter Joan Daves requests from Ms. McDonald the required signatures from Dr. King for the contract for the Oriya-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait," which is to be published in India.

Letter from MLK to David Sutton

Friday, September 10, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Downtown Luncheon Club to speak in Philadelphia.

Letter from W. J. Murphy to Deton Brooks

Monday, July 11, 1966

Congressman W. J. Murphy writes this letter to Dr. Deton Brooks, Executive Director of the Commission on Urban Opportunity. After listening to a radio show, of which Dr. Brooks and Dr. King posed commentary, Murphy was prompted with a response towards solving America's racial issues. Murphy states he initially opposed the executively ordered Fair Employment Practices Commission for the reason that brotherly love could not be legislated. FEPC requires that companies in governmental contract could not discriminate on the basis of race or religion.

Letter from Percy A. Blackburn to Ed Clayton

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Percy A. Blackburn refers to a previous letter Alice Bucher, president of S. J. Bucher Ltd. Lucerne sent Ed Clayton, SCLC Director of Public Relations, concerning their book about the History of the American Negro. Blackburn encloses a "resume of the proposed contents of the book." He also informs Mr. Clayton of Mrs. Bucher and her associate's current visit to the US and that they would like to arrange an appointment with Dr. King at his convenience.

Telegram from King Family to Mrs. Lucille Anderson

The King family sends its condolences to Mrs. Anderson.

Letter from Marsh Clark to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Acting Bureau Chief of Time Magazine, Marsh Clark encloses a Christmas gift for Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald. Clark jokingly requests that Dr. King not have plane layovers in small towns with weird names.

MLK Draft Notes: Worship

Dr. King preached this sermon at Dexter Avenue Baptist church on August 7, 1955. In this handwritten outline, Dr. King focuses on the practice of worship, claiming that it is an intrinsic part of human culture. After outlining a negative definition of worship, he approaches it from a "positive angle," describing a multitude of experiences he deems worshipful. Ultimately, he asserts that worship is useful on both a private and public level as it "helps us to transcend the hurly-burly of everyday life."

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Dr. King proclaims that race relations is a crisis that has existed for many years in America. As a result of unjust race relations, Negroes have embarked upon the current fight for equal rights.

Poor People's Campaign 1968

This pamphlet produced by the Southern Christian Leadership Council promotes the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D. C. for the spring of 1968.

1963 Income Statement for the SCLC

This document is a financial balance sheet for the SCLC for the fiscal period 9/1/63 to 8/31/64. The statement gives a breakdown of revenues and expenses and lists a net deficit of $50,622.59.

Letter from James A. Farmer to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Mr. Farmer thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Riverside Church for being their guest speaker. He tells Dr. King of the positive reaction that he received on his sermon.

Letter from A.M. Davis to Mr. James Parham Regarding Emory Case

Monday, October 2, 1967

A. M. Davis, President of the NAACP's Atlanta Branch, wrote this letter as part of an Atlanta Medical Association complaint against Emory University.

Letter from W.T. Durr to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Pastor Durr donates funds to help Dr. King and his efforts of nonviolence.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.

Letter from Swedish Members of Parliament to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966

Two members of Parliament in Stockholm, Sweden hope to establish a fund among Christian Social Democrats and other Swedish organizations to support the SCLC. They request Dr. King's presence at a meeting in Gothenburg.

Letter from C. Anderson Davis to MLK

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

C. Anderson Davis, Editor of "The Sphinx" and member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, requests Dr. King make an appearance and give an address at the traditional Negro Greek Letter fraternity's general convention.

Letter from Ann Bettiglan to MLK

Monday, August 16, 1965

Ann Bettiglan writes Dr. King informing him that her friend Daniza Thompson is in need of financial help. She gives Dr. King her friend's address and phone number so that he can assist her.

SCEF Policy Statement

This is a policy statement on current civil rights and civil liberties issues presented by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. The organization is an educational agency with the purpose of eradicating discrimination among the nation's citizens. This document contains a list of advocacies and condemnations as it relates to federal legislature in favor of civil rights support.

Letter from MLK to Richard V. Grulich

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Mr. Grulich regarding U.S. foreign policy, asserting that the federal government needs to develop the "moral courage" to admit past mistakes.

MLK Statement at Peace Event in Geneva

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King delivered this statement in Geneva at the Pacem In Terris ("Peace on Earth") II Convocation about the "costly, bloody and futile war in Vietnam."

Letter from William Gurland to MLK

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

William Gurland, chairman of the speakers committee at Adelphi University, invites Dr. King to address the student body at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York. Gurland understands that Dr. King is busy with other responsibilities, but hopes that Dr. King will consider his invitation.

Social Gospel

Dr. King defines social gospel with a quotation from Shailer Mathews and G. B. Smith's "A Dictionary of Religion and Ethics."

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966

This memorandum regarding SCLC liabilities, income and bank balances, was sent from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. King.