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MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1960

Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

In a statement to the Democratic National Convention, the authors of this document proclaim that they are seeking freedom. They say that immediate change will only come if the elected Chief Executive is committed to giving life to the Constitution. In an attempt to achieve this, they request that all of the Presidential nominees meet the people's delegation.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

The EIP, an association which seeks to establish the greatest number of schools in the world, asks Dr. King to become a member of their Board of Patrons.

Refinement By Fire

This brochure provides an overview of the SCLC Citizenship Education Program held at the Dorchester Community Center in Georgia.

Letter from Edris Head to MLK about Mormans and the Presidential Election

Saturday, May 20, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Head conveys to Dr. King her opinion of potential presidential candidate George Romney while criticizing the Mormon clergy and their road to priesthood. Additionally, Mrs. Head compares Dr. King to Gandhi and Jesus.

Excerpt from MLK's Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King discusses nonviolent resistance and freedom. He further challenges various communities by coining the slogan, "hate is always tragic."

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Telegram from Reverend Daniel Speed to Reverend Andrew Young

Monday, August 2, 1965

A telegram from Rev. Speed informing Rev. Young of arrival information for the 1965 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from L. D. Reddick to Colleagues

Monday, November 21, 1966

L. D. Reddick's colleagues received this letter pertaining to the business of Dr. King's papers and where they should be housed.

Soren Kierkegaard

Dr. King writes about Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard's first stage at which men live, aesthetics.

God

Dr. King uses a series of scriptures from the Book of Psalms and I Chronicles to show God's abiding love and faithfulness.

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

Monday, April 1, 1968

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

Holiday Greetings to You and Yours!

Frances Pauley inquires about the "white Santa Claus" and seeks the day when all children are equal.

Statement by Norman Truesdell About Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965

Norman Truesdell refutes Congressman William Dickenson's speech before the United States House of Representatives in which Dickenson claimed Reverend Truesdell left the Alabama Freedom March due to the immoral conduct of the marchers. Reverend Truesdell asserts that he left due to his studies at Wartburg Theological Seminary.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

This telegram forwarded by Rodney Clurman to Dr. King sends word regarding the need for transportation, food, medical supplies and water. Clurman also makes mention of a smallpox epidemic, stating that fifty million may die from the disease. He closes by encouraging the Reverend to wire him if interested in accompanying him to Scotland.

Letter from MLK to Philip Lubliner

Wednesday, August 23, 1961

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lubliner's support during the "freedom struggle in the South."

Letter from Dr. Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Dr. King expresses regret to Dr. Dick regarding his inability to participate in a series of meetings sponsored by the Conference of Mennonites in Winnipeg, Canada.

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

MLK Note Card - "Paint"

In this note card, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints on "...shin[ing] only for the life of imitative mediocrity."

Note from Mrs. Phyllis J. Sundquist to MLK

Mrs. Phyllis Sundquist encourages Dr. King to continue his stance against the Vietnam War for the betterment of the United States.

Dictator

Dr. King reveals the definition of a dictator according to Plato.

Telegram to MLK from Truman B. Douglass

Thursday, November 24, 1966

Truman B. Douglass, the chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), informs Dr. King that he has appealed to President Johnson for a meeting regarding the funding of CDGM.

Excerpt from The Drum Major Instinct

This passage quotes one of Dr. King's acclaimed sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia. He defines the desire to lead as "the Drum Major instinct." Seeing himself as a Drum Major for justice, peace, and righteousness, Dr. King posits what should be said at his funeral.

Knowledge

Dr. King outlines epistemological claims that deal with the "universals" and the "particulars" of knowledge. In doing so, he references the philosophical views of Socrates and St. Thomas Aquinas.

MLK Statement Regarding Housing Proposal in Chicago

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

Robert Clifton Weaver, the first United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, encloses a statement made by Dr. King for Joseph Califano, assistant to President Johnson. Dr. King announces a slum area housing redevelopment project in the Chicago areas of Lawndale, East Garfield Park and Kenwood Oakland.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Silas Norman of SNCC

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Silas Norman of SNCC to explain that Dr. King is currently touring several cities on the People-to-People tour and will be presiding over the SCLC convention. She informs him that his letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letter from Dora Byron to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963

The assistant director for the Office of Community Educational Service at Emory University invites Dr. King to appear on a local television program. She informs Dr. King that the program will feature influential leaders from the South and consist of a 30-minute interview by an Emory faculty member. In closing, she asks Dr. King to commit to a date between March 19 and April 16, 1963.

The United Nations Special Committee of 24

The United Nations Special Committee of 24 plans a series of meetings to discuss colonial territories in Africa, Aden, Oman, Mauritius, Seychelles and others.