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Brochure: "Some Important Fiscal Facts about the SCLC"

This document contains information about SCLC's administration, role, duties, and actions that its staff fulfills with the money donated to the organization.

Letter from MLK to Thomas J. Dodd

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Thomas J. Dodd's support in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from James E. Doherty to MLK Regarding School Desegregation

Monday, September 4, 1967
Connecticut (CT)

In this letter, Mr. Doherty encloses an article that includes civil right leaders views on school desegregation.

Making the Best of a Bad Mess

In this sermon, Dr. King discusses the letter Paul sent to Titus while he was in Crete. According to the letter, Crete was a terrible place for Christians, and Titus may have been confused as to why he was left there. Paul wrote to him saying that he left him there to make the situation better for the other people there. That is how one makes the best out of a bad mess.

Carbon Copy Letter from Dr. King to Joan Daves Regarding rights of "Strength To Love"

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Dr. King acknowledges that he is in receipt of Joan Daves letter about the schedule on June 8, as well as, the letter concerning the offer for the Japanese rights of "Strength To Love".

Letter from the University of Newcastle to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, UNITED KINGDOM

E. M. Bettenson, the registrar of the University of Newcastle, sends Dr. King a follow up letter inquiring his availability to accept an honorary degree.

Letter From Jim Letherer Regarding Proposed March

Thursday, November 23, 1967

In this letter Letherer suggests a March on Christmas Eve or Easter Sunday while expressing his continued support and participation in S.N.C.C.

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

Washington, D.C.

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA)

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

SCLC Voter Registration Agenda

This document captures the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's voter registration agenda in Detroit, Michigan between August 18 and August 23, 1967.

Letter from A3C Johnson to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965
California (CA), Montgomery, AL

Mr. Johnson writes to Dr. King requesting a recommendation letter for reclassification. Johnson explains that he is highly affiliated and a notable person must write his recommendation.

SCLC Six-Month Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Thomas Offenburger, Director of Information for the SCLC Department of Information, composes a semi-annual report detailing the work of the department for Dr. King and Reverend Abernathy.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, August 16, 1962
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper and Row, requests for Dr. King to give commentary on Louis Lomax's book "The Negro Revolt."

Song of Solomon

Dr. King discusses the biblical book Song of Solomon and asserts that it contains minimal significance and little, if any, religious value.

Telegram from Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights to MLK

Thursday, August 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and its executives offer support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Albany jail.

David T. Doherty Letter of Request to Dr. King

Friday, February 10, 1967
California (CA)

Mr. Deherty, a PH.D candidate at Stanford University, asks Dr. King if he will answer a few questions regarding the influence of Henry David Thoreau on his philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from MLK to Frances H. Vicario

Monday, February 26, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. Vicario and the Chemical Bank New York Trust Company for their generous contribution to the SCLC. He explains how the contribution will help in a time of need as the SCLC enters the critical phase of their ten-year ministry.

Statement Condemning Judge Elliot's Restraining Order

Sunday, July 22, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King and Dr. William G. Anderson, President of the Albany Movement, denounce US District Judge J. Robert Elliott's temporary restraining order that prevents them from staging protests. They add that, out of respect for the federal judiciary, they will abide by the order and appeal to a higher level. They assume the order applies only to the named defendants and colleagues and not to the entire community and will not discourage others from taking action. Judge Elliott’s injunction was later overturned by the Fifth Circuit US Court of Appeals.

Letter from Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn to S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, June 21, 1967
Boston, MA

In this letter, Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn enclosed a contribution of twenty-five dollars for S.C.L.C.

Civil Rights Movement Suggestions from MLK Supporter

This note to Dr. King outlines six suggestions to address inequality and aid with employment, education and civil rights reform.

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Monday, August 22, 1966
Detroit, MI, New York (NY)

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968
Florida (FL), Orangeburg, SC

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, CANADA

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

Letter from International Institute for Peace to MLK

Sunday, June 12, 1966
Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, AUSTRIA

O. P. Paliwal and Yves Choliere, from the World Council of Peace, invite Dr. King to speak at a session in Geneva about the well being of Vietnam.

Invitation from Charles H. Day to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965
Iowa (IA)

In this letter, Charles H. Day encloses a letter that invites Dr. King to Iowa on the behalf of Reverend Edwin T. Dahlberg.

Letter from Congressman Paul H. Todd to MLK

Monday, October 11, 1965
Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Florida Democratic Congressman Paul Todd explains to Dr. King why he voted against seating five congressman of the Mississippi Freedonm Democratic Party. Todd based his decision on an earlier precedent, which dismissed a previous claim "because it was brought by a party not legally a candidate for the contested seat."

Letter to Ralph David Abernathy from the Church Women United in Atlanta

Friday, April 26, 1968
Atlanta, GA

President Nancy Elliott Fowler of Church Women United in Atlanta writes to express her appreciation for the "magnificent job Rev. Abernathy did in the handling of Dr. King's funeral." Fowler also conveys the organization's unanimous approval to an enclosed resolution honoring Dr. King.

Letter from Captain Leonard Larsen to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966
VIETNAM, Florida (FL)

Captain Leonard Larsen writes Dr. King and attaches a copy of President John F. Kennedy's "Final Plea" regarding his sentiments about the Vietnam War. Larsen hopes to enhance and promote progress towards Dr. King's anti-war campaign.

Handwritten Notes Individuality and Participation

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on individuality and participation. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.