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Sin

Dr. King quotes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr on his perception of sin. Niebuhr discusses the creativity and uniqueness of man with his relation to God.

MLK's Statement on Current Electoral Politics

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Maryland (MD)

This is the draft of a statement that Dr. King planned to make, concerning the state of politics in America. Dr. King expresses his disappointment in that "the quality of some of the men elected makes a mockery of responsible government," and urges African-Americans to "lose faith in a shallow 'good will' that provides nothing."

Form Letter Regarding the Civil Rights Movement

In this form letter the author talks about the necessity to eliminate ignorance.

Time to Retire

Tuesday, November 20, 2012
New York, NY

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to the President of the SCLC, addresses Attorney General Eugene Cook regarding a conversation that was agreed to be private. Despite this agreement, the conversation was publicized to United Press International. Mr. Walker expresses his frustration and announces his next steps to the Attorney General.

Sin

ISRAEL

Dr. King paraphrases the teachings of Amos about sin. Dr. King writes that Amos condemns Israel for the sins of bribery, oppression of the poor by the rich, sexual immorality and the "self-indulgent use of what has been wrung from the helpless."

Letter from Andrew Heiskell to MLK

Tuesday, July 25, 1967
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI, Boston, MA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Heiskell extends an invitation for Dr. King to join Mayors of major cities and other national leaders in forming a coalition to address urban problems.

MLK Announces The Jail Sentences Stemming from the 1963 Birmingham Demonstrations

Monday, October 30, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Berkeley, CA, Wisconsin (WI), Brooklyn, NY, Ohio (OH), Selma, AL

Dr. King makes this statement regarding the arrest of himself and other leaders of the 1963 Birmingham struggle. The Supreme Court in 1967 ruled that these leaders unjustly broke the city wide injunction banning demonstrations. Dr. King urges the nation, "Take heed. Do not allow the Bill of Rights to become a prisoner of war."

Images from a Shot Sheet by Victor Summa

Chicago, IL

This piece vividly describes a poet's conception of an urban "Negro" scene. The poetic imagery paints a picture of a dilapidated neighborhood occupied by impoverished, helpless neighbors and drunkards who undergo tremendous emotional struggle. Dr. King's handwriting at the top of the poem indicates that he wanted this document filed.

Letter from the Algemeen Handelsblad to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
NETHERLANDS, Oslo, Norway, Birmingham, AL, NORWAY, Alabama (AL)

C. A. Steketee, chief editor of Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad, asks Dr. King to write an article about the American Civil Rights Movement.

Resolution for the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives

Washington, D.C.

This document is a resolution that explains the rules for current and incoming members of the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. N. C. Burtenshaw

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King sends his condolence to Rev. Burtenshaw of the Catholic Archdioceses of Atlanta for the death of Archbishop Hallinan.

Stokely Carmichael Requests MLK Photo

Thursday, October 20, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Julia Polk of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, asks for an autographed photo of Dr. King for Stokely Carmichael's collection.

Letter from MLK to Helen Anderson

Friday, February 9, 1968
California (CA)

This letter is in acknowledgement and appreciation of contributions to the SCLC from Mrs. Helen Anderson to Dr. King which was overlooked in the mail.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), HUNGARY

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Arthur Kinoy to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

In this letter, Mr. Kinoy informs Dr. King of an article in Rutgers' Law Review, that contains Kinoy's and Bill Kunstler's ideas in civil rights litigation. Kinoy is a law professor at Rutgers The State University.

Memo from Weston Hare to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Richmond, VA

Weston Hare offers support to Dr. King in regards to SCLC's training program for Negro ministers in urban leadership. The Ford Foundation issued a grant to SCLC to fund the program.

Letter from Walter P. Reuther to MLK

Monday, October 26, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Walter P. Reuther extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as a member of the Executive Committee for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

The Weaknesses of Liberal Theology

In this paper from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King discusses his thoughts regarding liberal theology, which he thinks is the most logical theology that exists. There are weaknesses, however, one being that it often loses itself in higher criticism.

Letter from MLK to H. A. Cruse

Wednesday, February 9, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King extends support to H. A. Cruse, an individual whose constitutional rights were violated. Dr. King emphasizes that it is not just Negroes who have been "subjected to victimization resulting from failure of Southern law enforcement authorities to follow constitutional practices."

Seating List for Pacem In Terris II

Geneva, Switzerland

This document is an alphabetical seating list of participants for the Pacem In Terris II (Peace on Earth) Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland.

Letter from Marion Logan to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967
New York (NY)

Marion Logan writes to Dr. King to discuss his possible involvement with Project H. "Project H calls for Black America to demand of Congress ten billion dollars now to appropriate for the Federal Housing...that are administered by HUD."

Telegram from R.C. Bell to Ivan Allen

Monday, March 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA

In this telegram to Mayor Allen of Atlanta, Dr. Bell protests the Dental Society. The Dental Society is scheduled to meet at the Municipal Auditorium on a segregated basis. Dr. Bell reminds Mayor Allen that the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled such segregation illegal.

Letter from Stephen R. Currier to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966
New York, NY

Stephen Currier invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a Christmas party at his place located at "666 Fifth Avenue on the 35th floor."

Progress in Race Relations

In this outline for a speech, Dr. King emphasizes the need for continued work in the area of race relations. He argues that it is necessary to abolish segregation for democracy to live.

Science

Dr. King's notecard addresses the analytical method of science. King interprets Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" to mean "[t]he method of science is to diversify or break up this experience into its component elements." He quotes Whitehead coining the term 'diversification of nature.'

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

VIETNAM, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, Brooklyn, NY, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

MLK Speaks Before the NAACP at Winston-Salem

Sunday, October 15, 1961
North Carolina (NC)

This program for the Winston-Salem branch of the NAACP highlights Dr. King as the guest speaker.

Letter from Haakon Knudsen to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

The Director of Field Activities from American Baptist Convention writes Dr. King to invite him to speak at the upcoming conference for their department.