Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Nashville, TN"

Education

Dr. King outlines his views on education.

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

Thursday, October 1, 1959

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Letter from James E. Bristol to Coretta Scott King

Monday, August 5, 1957

Mr. Bristol responds to a previous invitation to attend the SCLC's Tenth Annual Convention. He informs Mrs. King of his inability to attend due to a prior engagement but trusts that the convention will make a significant impact.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Letter from William H. Chester to MLK

Friday, September 6, 1963

William H. Chester writes Dr. King enclosing a donation to the SCLC from Mary Louise Hooper, chairman of the Northern California Committee on African Affairs, on behalf of the San Francisco Church-Labor Conference. The organization conducted a Human Rights Day parade that was broadcast in Africa. Mr. Chester further informs Dr. King that Mrs. Hooper encourages the SCLC to "keep moving forward until victory is achieved."

MLK Address at the AFL-CIO Fourth Constitutional Convention

Monday, December 11, 1961

Dr. King delivers a speech at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO to address the lack of equality and rights for laborers and people of color. Dr. King encourages those at the convention to remain steadfast in the fight for social justice in order to overcome the mountain of oppression.

Letter to MLK from Bertha Fiege Regarding Speech at Riverside Church

Friday, April 7, 1967

In this letter, Bertha Fiege is commending Dr. King on his speech at Riverside Church. She feels he serves great importance to furthering unity, not only racially, but around the world as well.

Hegel System Diagram

Dr. King outlines notes regarding Hegel's system, which includes logic, nature, the mind and the spirit.

God

Dr. King expounds on points made about the idea of "God," by Immanuel Kant, William James, and W.E. Hocking.

Letter to MLK from Vice President Hubert Humphrey

Thursday, June 15, 1967

In this letter, U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his support and applauds him for all his hard work, while commenting on fair and decent housing.

Letter from Johann R. Goelz to MLK

Tuesday, May 7, 1963

Johann R. Goelz highlights the spiritual irony that Dr. King's has the same name of the historical Martin Luther. Mr. Goelz served as a former Lutheran pastor in Germany and expounds on the religious realities of Jesus Christ.

Urban Insurance Coverage

Congressman William S. Moorhead introduces legislation to the House of Representatives, seeking to improve urban insurance coverage and provide governmental riot reinsurance.

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK Regarding Union Merger

Monday, November 21, 1966

Mr. Howard, Vice President of International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of negotiations for the merger of his organization's union and the United Steelworkers of America. If successful, this merger would strengthen the civil rights and labor movements in the South.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

In this letter Badeker writes to McDonald about the advancement from Gummessons Bokforlag for "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Elijah Muhammad to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

In this letter, Elijah Muhammad expresses the importance of black unity in the efforts for equality. Elijah Muhammad requests the presence of Dr. King and other prominent civil rights leaders at a meeting to discuss solutions to the ongoing struggle against injustice.

Telegram from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman Guyot to MLK

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman expresses concern regarding the SCLC's exclusion of "indigenous people of various political orientation in preparing the program" for the annual convention held in Jackson, MS.

Letter from Joseph F. McCrindle to SCLC

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Joseph F. McCrindle, President of the Henfield Foundation, encloses a check of $250.00 to SCLC on behalf of the Henfield Foundation.

Letter from Sue Jane Mitchell Smock to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Mrs. Smock writes to Dr. King a "note of appreciation" regarding the Nobel Peace Prize and her artwork. A 1964 issue of Time Magazine featured a photograph of Dr. King's living room which displayed a "woodcut print" of Mrs. Smock's work. She also invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a future exhibition in Atlanta.

The Man Who Was a Fool

The sermon "The Man Who Was a Fool," was published in the June 1961 issue of the journal The Pulpit. Dr. King delivered the sermon in both Chicago and Detroit in early 1961.

Letter to A.C. Skinner from Rev. Abernathy

Monday, January 9, 1967

Rev. Abernathy writes to inform Mr. Skinner of the crucial financial situation the SCLC is facing due to decreased contributor support after the "Black Power cry." He is asking the International Union of Mine Mill and Smelter Workers for a generous monetary contribution within the coming weeks.

Letter From Dr. Fred Lange - Nielsen to MLK

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Dr. Fred Lange - Nielson writes Dr. King informing him of a recent appeal that was sent to several Norwegian Bishops. He also encloses a copy of an official translated 'Manifesto'.

Letter from Gregory Ferguson to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Mr. Ferguson invites Dr. King to be the commencement speaker for the 1968 graduating class of Berkeley High School in Williamsburg, Virginia. The school can only afford $150 for a speaker, but he feels Dr. King's presence would make a great impact on the student body.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Monica Wilson

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Dora McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, responds to Monica Wilson at the University of Cape Town in acceptance of her invitation to speak at the institution. McDonald closes requesting confirmation of a date for Dr. King, as well as accommodation information.

Letter from Michael Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Rev. Michael Hamilton, Washington Cathedral Canon, thanks Dr. King for contributing a speech to be published in the book "The Vietnam War - Christian Perspectives." Rev. Hamilton informs Dr. King that proceeds from the book will be donated to the Swiss International Committee of the Red Cross. He also invites Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and use the platform to discuss current Congressional legislation. Dr. King would eventually preach his last sermon at the Washington Cathedral on March 31, 1968, four days before his assassination.

Grants of the Stern Family Fund

This memorandum, released by the Stern Family Fund, details grant offerings made by the foundation between March 1967 and February 1968. Among the grant recipients are the United Negro College Fund and the National Council of Churches.

Telegram from Bennette, Calhoun and Ellis to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

J.H. Calhoun, Ocelia Ellis and Fred Bennette send their prayers and support to Dr. King during Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham City Jail.

Moral Progress

Dr. King describes moral progress as endless struggle toward "an infinite goal," which will lead to "happiness."