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The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

Press Conference Statement on New York

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Dr. King addresses the city of New York and the problem of mounting violence. Dr. King urges the city to help take a stand by promoting social justice through nonviolence efforts and strategies.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Letter from Robert Finley to President Johnson

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Robert Finley proposes a federal gasoline tax increase of at least fifty cents to relieve the burden of property owners. He enumerates the benefits that would be achieved.

Response Letter from Dr. King to Irene Kohlmeyer

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King is responding to Iren Kohlmeyer's request to rebroadcast the transcripiton of the address at John Hopkins University. Dr. King gladly informs Kohlmeyer that permission is granted to do the rebroadcast.

Telegram From MLK to Dr. L. Frances Griffin and Dr. Milton Reid

Dr. King offers this inspirational message to Drs. Griffin and Reid for their outstanding leadership in the advancement of public education.

Letter from Emmi Kuhnlein to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mrs. Kuhnlein expresses admiration for Dr. King and shares her experiences as a member of the German Union movement. She equates the German working class living conditions as being similar to the slums in the US. She also suggests employing a tactic used by Israel of putting young people to work as a way to resolve slum conditions. A news clipping is attached to further support her suggestion.

Letter from MLK to Gilbert J. Clark

Saturday, May 21, 1966

Dr. King informs Gilbert J. Clark, Chairman at the Law School Forum, that he is unable to speak in Edmonton under the auspices of the Alberta Law School Forum during his trip to Canada.

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

Letter from H. W. Brown to MLK

Wednesday, October 24, 1962

H. W. Brown, a pastor at Bethel Baptist Church and proponent of Bahamas' Progressive Liberal Party, writes to Dr. King, asking him to be their honored speaker at a pre-election rally. Brown asks if Dr. King would also deliver the sermon at his church the morning of the rally.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962

Benjamin E. Mays offers celebratory wishes to Dr. King on the sixth anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conferece. Mays offers words of support and encouragement for the great work Dr. King has done in the fight for equality and justice.

House Un-American Activities Committee

Friday, May 15, 1964

This article summarizes the consequences that derive from the House Un-American Activities Committee labeling Civil Rights leaders as communists.

Letter from Thomas H. Uzzell

Monday, July 16, 1962

Thomas Uzzell asks Dr. King to read his book entitled, "The Twilight of Self-Government." Mr. Uzzell's book deals with the racial crisis in America and how it "can be solved in a democratic manner."

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Letter from Paul Feldman to MLK About New Publications

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter Paul Feldman, the Publications Coordinator for the League for Industrial Democracy, informs Dr. King of the upcoming publication of a new work entitled, "American Power in the Twentieth Century" by Michael Harrington. Feldman also informs Dr. King of the predicted demand for the publication and urges him to place his order early.

Letter from Lyman Farrar to Ralph David Abernathy regarding Advice and Counsel

Monday, April 29, 1968

Mr. Farrar writes to Dr. Abernathy for advice and cousel in an effort to contact Negro colleges in the United States. Mr. Farrar would like to make a personal contribution for a cause in which he explains in an enclosure.

Letter to Dr. Ralph Abernathy from Frank Binswanger

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

Frank G. Binswanger of the Philadelphia Civic Center, assures a recommitment to the cause for which Dr. King served and extends condolences to Dr. Abernathy regarding the loss of Dr. King.

Letter from John Dempsey to S. Ernest Vandiver

Monday, July 30, 1962

Connecticut governor John Dempsey writes to Georgia governor S. Earnest Vandiver expressing his concern for the safety of Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from MLK to George Carlson

Tuesday, October 2, 1962

Dr. King responds to George Carlson's letter of recent date informing him that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at the Temple. Dr. King states that he would love to speak in Portland, but his schedule does not permit any more engagements.

Letter from Barbara Meredith to MLK

Barbara Meredith communicates with Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail. She does not understand why individuals professing to be Christians approve of segregation. Meredith offers her prayers to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy and others in the midst of the struggle to end segregation.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

Law of Love

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man" on the place of the "law of love" in relation to human history.

Letter from Terry J. Fox to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

This letter, was written to Dr. King from Terry J. Fox. Terry J. Fox is the President of Iroquois Industries Inc. In this letter he attaches to Dr. King a copy of his company brochure.

MLK's Address at the University of the West Indies

Sunday, June 20, 1965

Dr. King spoke at the Valedictory Service of the University of the West Indies in Mona, Jamaica in 1965. On his topic "Facing the Challenge of a New Age," Dr. King addresses the international movement towards peace and equality, stating that "the wind of change is blowing all over the world."

Letter from Contributor to MLK

Thursday, July 28, 1966

The author offers support for the SCLC but is critical of Dr. King's interpretation of the term 'Black Power.' The author also suggests the formation of a third party candidate for the 1968 elections.

II Samuel Class Notes

Dr. King outlines the biblical Book of II Samuel by topic.

Letter from Ellen Tamaki to MLK

Friday, November 24, 1967

Ellen M. Tamaki, from Berkeley, California, has a list of questions for Dr. King that center on accusations of "merg[ing] the peace movement with the civil rights struggle." The writer references Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War and asks about the motivation for his opinions.

Letter to MLK from Ms. Eleanor Fischer

Monday, November 13, 1961

Ms. Fischer writes to confirm a conference meeting, for an interview with Dr. King. She requests his presence at an informal dinner to discuss details about the program, for which his interview will be taped. Finally, she concludes by extending formalities to Dr. King's family and conveys her interests in interviewing them as well.

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.