Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Nashville, TN"

Letter from Gloria Glissmeyer Regarding the State of the Nation

Thursday, February 29, 1968
Honolulu, HI, Texas (TX), London, England, New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C.

The following document is a letter written by Gloria Glissmeyer discussing the state of the nation during the Spring of 1968. The letter summarizes a series of events ranging from the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorder to the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to US Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall

Friday, March 23, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Stewart Udall, US Secretary of Interior, to thank him permitting the use of the Lincoln Memorial for the 100th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The event would come to be known as "The March on Washington," site of Dr. King's most famous speech.

Letter from MLK to Juanita Epps

Friday, July 9, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Juanita Epps and the members of the People's Community Church of Queens for their generous donation to SCLC. As Dr. King replies, "Your encouragement is an inspiration to me and all who are committed to the struggle for human rights and dignity."

Flyer for Confront the Warmakers at the Pentagon

California (CA)

This flyer from the Southern California Mobilization Committee advertises a public meeting. At the meeting, the committee plans to provide comprehensive reports from Washington and display a slide show of recent demonstrations. In addition, they plan to discuss future SCMC activities.

Nonviolent Leaders

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles B. McConnell

Thursday, October 31, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King thanks Rev. McConnell for his words of encouragement and financial contribution following the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King explains that Americans of all races and ethnicities must join together in this common cause to achieve American community.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informed Dr. King that “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" would not be able to be converted into a paperback book. Joan Daves is Dr. King’s literary agent.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967
Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), CANADA, Ohio (OH), Tennessee (TN), Missouri (MO), Virginia (VA), New Orleans, LA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Dialogue: A Search for Reconciliation

Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA)

Through the power of dialogue, the SCLC seeks to bring diverse cultures together for the purpose of removing barriers and achieving meaningful communication. This brochure outlines six programs of action designed to achieve this goal including group conversation, community dialogue, dialogue of faith, campus dialogue, dialogue round tables, and dialogue with self.

Letter from Julius H. Avery to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Julius H. Avery notifies Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta for a conference at the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. Mr. Avery further requests that during his visit to the city, he and Dr. King arrange a meeting.

Theology

Dr. King comments on theology and theological science.

Letter from Larry Boyd to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Larry Boyd, President of the United Piedmont Society, writes Dr. King in relation to a contribution his organization forwarded to the SCLC. Boyd writes that he has yet to receive a response from the SCLC regarding a donation of $2,000.

Photographed Sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt

This is a photographed sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt 1884-1962.

Letter from William H. Chester to MLK

Friday, September 6, 1963
San Francisco, CA, SOUTH AFRICA, California (CA)

William H. Chester writes Dr. King enclosing a donation to the SCLC from Mary Louise Hooper, chairman of the Northern California Committee on African Affairs, on behalf of the San Francisco Church-Labor Conference. The organization conducted a Human Rights Day parade that was broadcast in Africa. Mr. Chester further informs Dr. King that Mrs. Hooper encourages the SCLC to "keep moving forward until victory is achieved."

Letter from Helen White to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Ms. White seeks the opinion of Dr. King for her research on American Aristocracy.

Volunteers Serving Program

Georgia (GA)

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Louisville, KY

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Invitation to the 20th Anniversary World Conference Against Atom and Hydrogen Bombs

Saturday, June 26, 1965
JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

Ichiro Mortaki, of the Japan Congress Against Atom & Hyrdrogen Bombs, invites Dr. King to their conference taking place 20 years after two atomic bombs were dropping on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II. This leading Japanese disarmament organization was founded the same year they extended this invitation to Dr. King.

Telegram from MLK to Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph that he will not be able to attend the emergency convocation. He also notes why this convocation is needed.

Background of the Speakers

Selma, AL, San Francisco, CA, New York (NY), VIETNAM

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

Inquirer: "Not Accepting White Help Black Power Weakness"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

The Atlanta Inquirer released this review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review highlighted important issues transcribed in Dr. King's book. The most important issue, highlighted in the review, involved his views on the conflicts of the black power movement. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was released in 1967.

Invitation from Frederick Williams to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Brooklyn, NY

Frederick Williams, Director of the New York City Board of Education, asks Dr. King to appear as a guest speaker on the board's new television station, WNYC-TV.

Letter from James E. Davis to MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1966
Nashville, TN, Atlanta, GA

Rev. James A. Davis requests the assistance of Dr. King in his graduate studies focusing on pastoral care and race relations. Davis was recently appointed as the assistant pastor of the Carroll Street Methodist Church in Nashville and expresses distaste with the fact that there are no Negroes members in the congregation. Davis wishes for the Carroll Street Methodist Church to become more inclusive.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Lisl Cade to Dora McDonald Regarding Various Interview Requests for Dr. King

In this letter, Lisl Cade of Harper & Row Publishers requests for Dr. King to interview with a Washington, D.C. television program and a San Francisco radio program.

Letter from MLK to Delta Air Lines Requesting Support

Friday, July 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Delta Air Lines asking for a cash donation to contribute to the production of a commemorative booklet celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Keith G. Allen to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, CA

In this letter, Mr. Allen requests an allocation from the sum of money that was granted to the SCLC from the Ford Foundation.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The sender of this letter lists six main goals that should be accomplished in 1968. The sender pleads for Dr. King to take leadership in accomplishing these goals.

Telegram from Truman Douglass to MLK about Pending Letter

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

This telegram was sent to Dr. King from Truman D. Douglass regarding an upcoming telegram pertaining to nine conditions set forth in an earlier letter. Douglass is the Chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.