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"Nashville, TN"

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Friday, June 30, 1967

Maurice Dawkins informs Dr. King that their meeting is being followed up with action in various regions and with cooperation of the OEO Regional Directors and Civil Rights Coordinators.

Handwritten notes on the Personality of God

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on personality of God. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

House Resolution 12962

Monday, September 18, 1967

This is a copy of House Resolution 12962, passed by the Ninetieth United States Congress in 1967. This resolution called for the establishment of a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Community of Glenville, City of Cleveland,

This 1965 brochure from the Office of the City Planning Commission, Cleveland, OH, focuses on the "almost all-Negro community" of Glenville. In it the Commission discusses both its ability to assist the community and the responsibility of the community to engage in grass roots activities that would serve as a springboard for larger scale urban renewal. The overall message of the brochure is that for the City to provide assistance, the community will have to "begin at home".

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

The author argues that the Civil Rights Movement joining the Peace Demonstrators will aid America's enemies and prolong the Vietnam war.

The Purpose of the State

Dr. King records some thoughts on the functions of the state.

Letter from Robert Green to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

SCLC Education Director Robert Green writes Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach requesting a federal intervention on discrimination practices in Mississippi. Green complains that members of SCLC, SNCC, CORE and other organizations were denied access to restrooms during the 1966 James Meredith March Against Fear.

MLK Address to District 65, AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 18, 1965

This is the text of an address Dr. King gave to District 65, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Dr. King references his stay in Birmingham Jail and expresses his optimism that the nonviolent movement will be successful.

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

Wednesday, July 6, 1960

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.

Telegram from Walter Friedrich to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Walter Friedrich, on behalf of the Peace Council of the German Democratic Republic, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

Postage Stamp, April 4, 1968

This postage stamp to Washington D.C is dated April 4, 1968.

Telegram from Robert M. Ball to MLK

Monday, February 7, 1966

Mr.Ball, Social Security Administration Commissioner, invites Dr. King to participate in an information session concerning a proposed medicare program. The meeting will be held in Baltimore, MD.

Letter from Michael Bennett to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

In this letter, Mr.Michael Bennett expresses how delighted the NAACP is knowing Dr. King will lecture on Kent State University's campus.

Letter from Tore Lundby to MLK

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Tore Lundby, editor, requests Dr. King to write an article on equality in America for a secondary school magazine.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

Wednesday, July 15, 1964

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, September 10, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait", which will appear in the Washington Afro-American. The advertisement has also been published in Ebony magazine.

Letter from William S. Minor to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

William Minor, the Director of The Foundation for Creative Philosophy, invites Dr. King to speak at The Society for Creative Ethics meeting in New York.

Statement from Jack Wood Jr. to the National Association of Housing Cooperatives

Saturday, March 19, 1966

Wood commends President Johnson for his call for a Fair Housing Act and the Demonstration Cities Act of 1966 that would provide funds for rehabilitation of urban ghettoes. However, he laments the fact that they are separate bills and the government is accepting applications for the Demonstration Cities program absent a Fair Housing Act.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Telegram from F. M. Horton to MLK

F. M. Horton relays Norwegian ambassador True Davis' congratulations to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Chicago Freedom Rally

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This document reflects an informational flyer regarding the Chicago Freedom Rally which promotes integration.

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Coordinating Center to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967

A.L. Everett conveys pleasure in knowing Dr. and Mrs. King are sponsors of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, and that Dr. King will be speaking at an upcoming rally in San Francisco on April 15th. Everett requests that any further press releases concerning the planned demonstrations in both San Francisco and New York also include statements from both Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1962

In this letter to Dr. King, Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College informs Dr. King about the meeting with Robert Troutman on matters that involve input from President Kennedy.

Letter from MLK to Rev. H. Edward Whitaker

Tuesday, April 3, 1962

Dr. King responds to a letter from Rev. Edward Whitaker, regarding Whitaker's desire to be a college minster. He expresses to Whitaker that his experience should serve him well for such a responsibility. Dr. King and Rev. Whitaker were classmates at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Fleeing From God

This sermon, delivered by Dr. King on April 4, 1956, discusses the human desire to escape God. Dr. King attributes this inclination to the fact that man wants to hide from God's immanent nature and harbors a general unwillingness to follow God's commandments.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, February 19, 1962

Dr. King and Wyatt Walker send an urgent request for Burke Marshall to investigate the bombing of SCLC Board Member C. O. Simpkins' home in Shreveport, Louisiana. The two SCLC officials inform Mr. Marshall that the suspects were released for lack of evidence despite other information to the contrary.

Telegram from Russell Tuten to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Russell Tuten writes Dr. King expressing his support in extending Voting Rights and complete citizenship to all Georgia residents. Tuten states, "Georgia should be commended for its progress in conforming to the laws of the land."

Letter from MLK to Rev. A C K Arbouin

Friday, May 5, 1967

This letter is in response to and appreciation of contributions, made to the SCLC, by Reverend A C K Arbouin.