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"Nevada (NV)"

Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

Postcard from Jacksonville Beach

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This postcard to Dr. King requesting an autograph is one printed by the Jacksonville Beach, Florida Chamber of Commerce.

Proposal for Black Independence

Al Shabazz writes up a program for Black independence. The proposal suggests two program options for leaders to choose from. Once the program has been decided the leader would go out and gather the opinion of the masses. Next, the program would implement unconventional education along with employment and survival skills. The program also promotes an independent nation with alliances from those of all races. The program promotes black revolution and the demise of the elite White Supremacist.

Letter from Allan B. Schmier to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Allan Schmier writes to request a meeting with Dr. King during the Central Conference of Teamsters Convention in Detroit, Michigan. Schmier expresses that he was instructed by the acting chairman to make the request and informs him of the purpose of the meeting.

Conversion

Dr. King quotes Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy's book "What I Believe." Tolstoy asserts that when he came to believe in Christ's teachings his whole life and perception changed.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers for MLK

Saturday, December 31, 1966

This royalty statement from Harper & Row Publishers, details earnings for Dr. King's book "Strength to Love," for the six-month period ending 12/31/66.

Letter from Time Magazine Publisher Bernhard Auer to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963

Bernhard Auer communicates his disappointment that Dr. King will be unavailable to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine.

Conception of Man

Dr. King documents a passage from Reinhold Niebuhr's work "The Nature and Destiny of Man." He would later cite this work in his essay "The Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr," written during his career at Boston University.

Letter from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967

Teddy Kollek, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Israel, expresses appreciation and support for Dr. King's planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. At the time of this letter, West Jerusalem was Israeli territory and East Jerusalem part of Jordan. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

The Mainichi Newspaper to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Aoki Shigeru, General Manager of The Mainichi Newspaper's Washington Bureau, requests an interview with Dr. King regarding the ending of the Vietnam War.

Letter from Mary Mikutel to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Mary Mikutel offers her condolences to Mrs. King in the wake of Dr. King's assassination.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Telegram from Mrs. Frances Lucas to C. T. Vivian and Alvin Pitcher

Thursday, January 9, 1969

Mrs. Lucas informs Mr. Vivian and Mr. Pitcher of Mrs. King's unavailability to speak at the YMCA in Chicago. A memorial service in honor of Dr. King is scheduled on the same date in Atlanta.

MLK's handwritten notecard regarding Fact

On this notecard, Dr. King cites the definition of the word 'fact' from The Hibbert Journal, July 1933, according to Arthur Darby Nock.

Progressives to Face Important Issues in Birmingham

Monday, October 31, 1966

This news release details a meeting of the Progressive National Baptist Convention's Southern Regional in Birmingham, Alabama. Reverend Martin King, Sr. is one of the many pastors participating.

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.

Letter from MLK to Dr. James C. Gray

Monday, November 18, 1963

Dr. King thanks Dr. James Gray for his generous contribution to the SCLC and states, "Without your dollars for freedom, the Conference would be unable to work effectively."

Lette from Morton Sobell to a Friend

Tuesday, August 23, 1966

Mrs. Sobell requests that Dr. King attend the open hearing for Morton Sobell. She also asks for financial support to aid in his defense.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to Ella

Wednesday, July 22, 1959

Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker provides his appraisal regarding an earlier proposal by Spelman College to create an Institute on Nonviolence. Walker addresses the letter to Ella describing several categories of interest pertaining to the organization of this event.

Letter from Sheldon C. Singer to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

The Executive Vice President of Ring Radio informs Dr. King of attacks made by callers to the station's "Openline" program. He also invites Dr. King to respond to the attacks.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Smith

Friday, July 31, 1964

Dora McDonald writes William Smith of Fullerton Junior College on behalf of Dr. King, granting permission to reprint material from Time magazine regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Young Americans Newsletter

This Young Americans newsletter covers topics such as: The Vietnam War, Young Americans for Freedom, and the usage of violence for a good cause.

The World of the Patriarchs

Dr. King records historical and geographical data regarding several countries, such as Egypt, Greece, and Palestine. King places a special emphasis on the "World of the Patriarch," the title of this document, and writes notes on the "age of the Patriarch," which takes place after 2000 B. C.

Letter from Christopher Pearce to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Mr. Pearce, a young English filmmaker, desiring to produce a documentary on Dr. King, requests permission to follow him about Washington, D. C. during his upcoming visit.

Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie Writes to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967

Johan Keijser, writing for the Board of the Foundation of Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie, sends a letter to Dr. King. It includes a list of names of those whom the group has invited to form a committee of support for their efforts in creating a "provisional world government." The list includes artists, intellectuals, national government leaders, and religious leaders from all over the world. Remarkably, it also includes "father of the hydrogen bomb" Edward Teller.

A. N. Whitehead

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's view of the philosophy of science in The Concept of Nature.

Interview Outline for WAII-TV Show-Profile Emory University Atlanta, Georgia

Thursday, April 9, 1964

This document outlines Dr. Edward T. Ladd's interview with Dr. King, for broadcast on WAII-TV's program "Profile Emory University."

Letter from Anonymous to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

The author of this letter expresses their concern about poverty across the United States and offers suggestions for Negros to build their own communities.

Letters from Jeanette Allen Behre to MLKCharles. H. Behre to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Two professors of Columbia University, Dr. Jeanette Allen Behre and Chas. H. Behre Jr., express their dissent with Dr. King taking a public stand on the war in Vietnam. The professors feel Dr. King is jeopardizing his support for the civil rights.