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Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Congressman Gallagher of New Jersey writes Dr. King to confirm reception of his telegram in which he urges House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Mississippi Congress was seated despite Congressman Gallagher's vote against the action.

Letter from Boyd Burns to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Boyd Burns criticizes Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War, equating it to the statements he hears from his white friends regarding the civil rights movement.

Letter from Enrique Meneses to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Enrique Meneses writes to Dr. King requesting a television appearance by the Reverend for the Spanish magazine, "TELE-Radio."

Invitation to MLK from London Methodist Youth Organization

Monday, May 15, 1967

Greater London Youth and Community Service invites Dr. King to participate in a London to Canterbury Pilgrimage by leading a study on human rights and the church and preaching a sermon.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

Letter from MLK to the McKeesport, Pennsylvania NAACP

Tuesday, March 27, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the McKeesport, Pennsylvania Branch of the NAACP.

Letter from Marilyn Thomburgh to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Marilyn Thomburgh writes Dr. King addressing the issue of polluted water in the US and asks why there is nothing done about this matter.

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

Tuesday, September 28, 1965

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Joel Goor

Monday, August 17, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Rabbi Joel Goor of Dr. King's absence from the city due to an engagement to speak before the European Baptist Federation. She promises to have Dr. King signed a copy of his book for Goor to keep and appreciates Goor's support to the civil rights movement.

At Your Service!

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

The Gospel and How We Love Our Enemies

John C. Heidbrink sets forth the notion that in order to be a disciple of Christ, in any age, one must express unconditional love "toward him who seeks to destroy us," irrespective of differences in personal, national, or religious sentiments.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that a check for $24.96 is enclosed. The check represents the permission fee for the use of an extract from "Stride Toward Freedom" by Macmillan Company.

"Where Do We Go From Here"-Invoice

Monday, May 22, 1967

This document contains a Harper & Row, Publishers invoice for the sale of four copies of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Samuel W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1956

In this letter, Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, offers encouraging words to Dr. King.

Book payment to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

This cable from Dr. King's agent accompanied a royalty payment for the Japanese language edition of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, August 16, 1962

Cass Canfield, of Harper and Row, requests for Dr. King to give commentary on Louis Lomax's book "The Negro Revolt."

Selma Friendship Day Report

This document highlights information surrounding "Selma Friendship Day," which was a white-led counter-protest intended to offset the effects of Kingian boycotts. This counter-protest was met with a demonstration, in which 120 pro-Kingian persons were arrested and the local SCLC office was barricaded.

Revelation

Dr. King discusses the idea that Jesus Christ is the only direct form of revelation, which was proposed in Emil Brunner's "The Mediator."

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.

Letter from MLK to Verna L. Halll

Tuesday, January 29, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Hall and the rest of the Mississippi Club for their donation. He assures her that "good will contributions" are necessary for the work of the SCLC to continue.

Letter from J. B. Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1963

J. B. Hamilton expresses gratitude for Dr. King's visit to the Mount Zion Baptist Church in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Mr. James Harrison

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

The Chicago Adult Education Department provides the Behavior Research Laboratories with the needed funds to amend the budget for their contract. Robert L. Green provides Mr. James Harrison with the distribution location for this contribution.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from MLK to Sara Mitchell

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Mitchell, a representative from the Atlanta Board of Education, for her recent letter acclaiming his book "Where Do We Go From Here." Dr. King states that the lack of material on Negro History and culture in America's public schools is "appalling" and children from all races will benefit from learning about another aspect of American culture and history.

Letter from MLK to May Edward Chinn

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King responds to Dr. May Chinn's letter of support and encouragement. King states, "Our struggle for freedom is often difficult and the moments are often frustrating, but we gain new courage to carry on..."

Letter to Hermine Popper from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Hermine Popper and her husband Bob for their generous contributions. He also requests a copy of Hermine's book to read for his enjoyment.