Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Nevada (NV)"

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Baltimore, MD

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Letter from Carl A. Auerbach to MLK

Monday, December 6, 1965
Minnesota (MN)

Carl A. Auerbach has declined to make contributions to the S.C.L.C based on the assumption that Dr. King will use the funds for protest movements "against the American policy in Vietnam."

Letter to Ms. Dora McDonald from Solomon Mendelson

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
New York (NY)

Mr. Solomon Mendelson informs the SCLC and Ms. Dora McDonald that CBS will not be televising Dr. King's "I have a Dream Speech."

Class Notes

Dr. King records notes from the biblical Book of Judges regarding topics such as knowledge, sin, the doctrine of God and ethics.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

Letter from MLK to Jan Helge Jansen

Tuesday, April 7, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak in Oslo, Norway in the fall of 1964. He informs the requester that the "present temper of events in this section of the country" has influenced him to adopt a policy of not accepting invitations more than two months in advance. He states, however, that he will keep the invitation on file and communicate with the sender in September regarding his eligibility to accept the invitation.

Letter from Inam Rahman to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964
INDIA, Montgomery, AL

Inam Rahman, member of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations, sends Dr. King a copy of the letter from the President of the Council inviting him to present a speech at the Azad Memorial Lectures.

Letter from Harper & Row to Joan Daves regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 11, 1964

Harper & Row informs Joan Daves about the receipt of the quote on Dr. King from Harry Golden, Editor of the Carolina Israelite.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Edward Greaves

Wednesday, August 14, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Miss Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Edward Greaves that additional copies of Dr. King's sermon entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians" are unavailable. She refers Mrs. Greaves to locate the sermon in Dr. King's newly released book "Strength to Love."

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968
Texas (TX), VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Mr. Brookshire explains to Dr. King the application of the U.S. Constitution to underprivileged groups and urges him to avoid matters of war and peace.

Telegram from Irving Block to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Rabbi Irving J. Block of the Brotherhood Synagogue in New York requests to meet with Dr. King regarding the Negro Jewish community.

SCLC Report on the Status of the Affiliate Department

Monday, June 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL

T. Y. Rogers gives a detailed report as the Acting Director of the SCLC Affiliates Department. He includes certain organization procedures that will enhance the vitality of the staff and the number of affiliates in various regions of the country.

Birthday Card to MLK

Thursday, January 15, 1959

Elaine Stears and Family wish Dr. King a Happy Birthday.

Letter from Dennis Askey to Dora McDonald Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 24, 1964
Washington, D.C., Oslo, Norway

Dennis Askey from the United States Information Agency sends Dora McDonald a detailed itinerary of the award ceremony for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Monday, February 8, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Preaching

Dr. King quotes Samuel Arthur Devan's "Ascent to Zion."

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Letter From Clifford Alexander Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Clifford Alexander Jr. thanks Dr. King for supporting him in his nomination as Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Resolution of the SCLC Board Regarding Vietnam

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, VIETNAM

This resolution of the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, outlines the effects of the expansion of the Vietnam War and recommends future action steps for the administration of the organization.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The sender of this letter lists six main goals that should be accomplished in 1968. The sender pleads for Dr. King to take leadership in accomplishing these goals.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

An Invitation to the Honoring of Rabbi Israel Dresner and Reverend Richard Wilson

New Jersey (NJ)

This document serves as an invitation to a event honoring Rabbi Dresner and Rev. Wilson for their outstanding spiritual leadership.

Patripassianism

Dr. King gives a definition of patripassianism.

Letter from Maurice Mitchell to Neil Sullivan

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
Denver, CO, Berkeley, CA, Chicago, IL

Mr. Mitchell discusses fundraising for SCLC's Chicago literacy project. HEW recently withdrew their support of the project, but Mitchell is optimistic about potential support from foundations and major donors.

Letter from R. Abraham to MLK

Saturday, September 20, 1958
New York, NY

R. Abraham sends this get-well letter to Dr. King wishing a full recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital. Also enclosed is a gift in appreciation for Dr. King's work for humanity.

J.H. Emms to MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY

J.H. Emms offers his approval and support to Dr. King regarding his position on Civil Rights and the Vietnam problem, which were expressed at speeches in Los Angeles and New York.

Civil-Righters Isolation

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., California (CA), BAHAMAS, Mississippi (MS), VIETNAM, Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Arizona (AZ)

David Lawrence states that the recent initiatives of Negro leaders are hindering the overall mission of the Civil Rights Movement. He believes that Negro groups are defeating their own cause.

Power

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Letter from Robert W. Fischer to MLK

Monday, January 27, 1964
Washington, D.C., ITALY

Robert Fischer is a collector of autographed TIME magazine covers that feature famous personalities. He requests the cover with Dr. King's portrait, so that he may add it to his growing collection.