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Levels of Love

Dr. King outlines several levels of love, such as Christian love, utilitarianism love and romantic love.

Letter from MLK to Delta Air Lines Requesting Support

Friday, July 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Delta Air Lines asking for a cash donation to contribute to the production of a commemorative booklet celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from M. L. Banner to MLK

Friday, September 13, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The board of directors of the Booker T. Washington Center, Inc. requests Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker for their annual banquet. The Booker T. Washington Center is the only predominately Negro Welfare Agency in the community.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Letter from Mary T. Heathcote to MLK

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Mary Heathcote of MacMillan Publishing Company asks Dr. King and the SCLC to help promote a book being written by Henrietta Buckmaster. Buckmaster, whom Dr. King quoted in "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," chronicles the events of Reconstruction.

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

Wednesday, March 9, 1966
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL)

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

Letter from Leonard E. Loper to MLK

Saturday, June 8, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Indiana (IN)

Leonard Loper, of Mount Zion Baptist Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can be the keynote speaker for the church's Men's Day service.

Letter from Mrs. Nat Cole to Donald Frey

Thursday, May 6, 1965
Illinois (IL)

This letter was sent from Mrs. Nat (Mona) Cole to Mr. Donald S. Frey. In this letter Mrs. Cole thanks Mr. Frey for forwarding the Open Occupancy Award Certificate to her, honoring her late husband Nat King Cole.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical Book of Leviticus regarding the transformation of sin.

Letter from Wolfgang S. Homburger to MLK

Tuesday, October 17, 1967
California (CA), Chicago, Berkeley, CA, HAITI

Mr. Homburger, Assistant Director for the Institute of Transportation Studies in Berkeley, requests additional information from Dr. King before responding to his appeal for funds.

Vietnam and the Conscience of U.S.A.

Monday, May 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Denver, CO, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

The author argues that the U.S. is fighting a false bogey of international communism in Vietnam at the expense of Great Society programs at home.

Operation Breadbasket As Vision, Promise and Hope

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This report discusses the socio-economic position of Negroes as it relates to education achievement, employment opportunities, and access to power and societal institutions.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbert Spencer's views on philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Joseph Berke to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
London, England, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Joseph Berke replies to Dr. King's response to an invitation to attend the Dialectics of Liberation and shares his content with one of Dr. King's speeches on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Rhoda Dorsey to MLK

Thursday, May 21, 1964
Baltimore, MD, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

Rhoda Dorsey, Dean and Associate Professor of History at Goucher College, informs Dr. King that they have included "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" on the freshman class reading list.

Letter from Mrs. Robert Hall to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
New York (NY)

Mrs. Hall suggests a letter writing campaign for young people as a more effective and less intimidating means of demonstrating than petitions and marches.

"I, Too" by Jerry Peace

Alabama (AL)

This document displays the poem "I, Too" by Jerry Peace

Prayer (Definition)

Dr. King quotes William James' definition of Prayer.

Letter from Marc Steel to Rev. R.D. Abernathy about a Term Paper

Saturday, April 27, 1968
Baltimore, MD

Marc Steel, a high school sophomore from Maryland, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy, requesting information on his role in the Civil Rights Movement. This student sought to acquire a narrative of Rev. Abernathy and his goals for SCLC, in order to complete a term paper.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966
New York, NY

Mr. Wilkins, Chairman of the Call Committee, writes to assure Dr. King's participation in an upcoming conference. Worldwide interest is developing and Dr. King's presence and leadership is very important.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Benjamin E. Mays offers celebratory wishes to Dr. King on the sixth anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conferece. Mays offers words of support and encouragement for the great work Dr. King has done in the fight for equality and justice.

Photo of MLK

An unidentified photo of Dr. King from the Morehouse Collection.

Letter from Shelley Winters Franciosa to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1959
New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

Actress Shelley Winters sends Dr. King her personal copy of "The Diary of Anne Frank" after he and Mrs. King attend a screening for the film adaptation in New York. Winters would go on to receive an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for the film.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable Joseph S. Clark

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Senator Joseph S. Clark of Pennsylvania to commend his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Robert Johnson Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1961
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mr. Smith invites Dr. King to be a special guest at the Annual Men's Day at Salem Baptist Church. He also asks Dr. King to recommend Herbert C. Nelson for appointment as a federal judge.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, June 22, 1966
INDIA, Atlanta, GA

Dinkar Sakrikar, General Secretary of Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti, expresses appreciation to Dr. King for accepting a Mahatma Gandhi memorial gift. The memorial gift includes Indian children's toys, a set of Gandhi's books, and a bronze statue of Gandhi to be installed in a children's park in the United States.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, CANADA

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

Salute to Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tuesday, December 11, 1962
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA)

This program for "Salute to Martin Luther King Jr." features a performance by the entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr. and an address by Dr. King.

The Misuse of Prayer

Monday, July 17, 1950

In this sermon delivered at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King elaborates on the proper uses of prayer and how it should be a supplemental asset.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Saturday, March 12, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Brooklyn, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.