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Letter from Gerald G. Fenn to MLK

In this letter, Geraldine Fenn described the many ventures that occurred the previous year. Her main focus was on 4-H and combining agriculture with race relations. She felt that by understanding and respecting people from different backgrounds, it could then lead to a collective of peace and love.

Letter from MLK to Keith Black

Thursday, June 9, 1966

Dr. King thanks Keith Black and the Valley Community Presbyterian Church for their contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, stating the progress and upcoming goals of the organization.

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Program - Thompson Memorial Chapel-Williams College

Sunday, April 16, 1961

This document is a Sunday service program from Thompson Memorial Chapel at Williams College. Dr. King is noted as a guest preacher.

Letter from James W. Kelly to MLK

Thursday, October 17, 1963

James W. Kelly, Director of Chaplains Division, writes Dr. King inviting him to a Supervisory Chaplains Conference headed by the Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy. Kelly states that the conference is a rededication of service to God and his people in the military. Kelly closes by stating, "Your Cooperation will be a great contribution to the cause of religion in the United States Navy and Marine Corps and to their clergymen in uniform."

Jesus

Dr. King highlights the significant characteristics of Jesus Christ.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Telegram from Students at Syracuse University to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

The students of Syracuse University thank Dr. King for his opposition to the war in Vietnam. They encourage him to appear in New York City for the mobilization rally scheduled for April 15, 1967 outside the United Nations.

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

Credit

Saturday, September 1, 1962

This poem examines a man's earthly worth and finally his heavenly worth.

SCLC Newsletter: February 1964

Saturday, February 1, 1964

This SCLC newsletter covers items ranging from Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize nomination to voter registration drives throughout the country. The lead photo features national civil rights leaders "summoned to the White House for a special conference with President Lyndon B. Johnson."

Social Justice

Dr. King notes that Isaiah 1:11-17 describes various forms of worship and declares that God will not hear them but demands righteousness and fulfillment of social obligations. He compares this passage with the prophet Amos.

Letter from Adam C. Powell to Wyatt Tee Walker

Reverend Adam Clayton Powell copies to MLK a letter informing Wyatt Walker that his preaching duties at Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem are being terminated because of budget constraints.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.

State of New York Civil Rights Bureau - 1967 Annual Report

This is the overview of the advancements and achievements affiliated with the New York Civil Rights Bureau, in 1967.

Letter from MLK to Crawford Johnson

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Crawford Johnson for an event hosted at the Palais des Sports in Paris, France.

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from June Alder to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mrs. Alder expresses her support and concern regarding integrated housing.

Reuther in Praise of Poverty War Funds to Alabama Farmers Cooperative

Monday, May 15, 1967

Walter Reuther, president of United Auto Workers, comments on the Office of Economic Opportunity's decision to give financial aid to the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Bartley to MLK

Dr. King was sent this telegram from a couple who had recently heard him speak, prior to his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

Letter from William Eerdmans, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1963

William. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company requests to reprint Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" in a small booklet for wider circulation. Eerdmans, Jr. writes, "your words...are those of a Christian martyr and saint."

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Annual Report, 1955-1956

This report contains vital information concerning the organizational structure, services, and members of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Dr. King provides a heartfelt address to the Montgomery, AL congregation as he seeks to extend the church's influence throughout the community amidst his growing involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to J. E. L. Graham

Thursday, September 15, 1966

Dr. King informs Mr. Graham that he is unable to accept an invitation to speak in Ontario extended by the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations. He further explains that this decision is necessary in order to spend more time resolving racial injustice issues in our country.

Letter from Richard L. Zanglin to MLK

Wednesday, August 9, 1967

Richard L. Zanglin invites Dr. King to speak to the student body at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood, Inc. Program

Friday, June 4, 1965

The Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood organized this program where Dr. King makes a special address.

Faith

Dr. King quotes William James' "The Sentiment of Rationality."

International Vacation Courses

Friday, November 22, 1963

Miss Margaret Scattergood invites Dr. King to Denmark to address the issues of the struggle in the United States to give the Negro full partnership in American society.