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Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Letter to Dora MacDonald from Joan Daves

Monday, December 12, 1966

Joan Daves writes to Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's availability, while he's away in New York. She also requests that a copy of the transcript, from a conference, be given to Dr. King as well as herself.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Religious Experience

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and G. K. Chesterton on the need for trying the Christian experiment to have the Christian experience.

Letter from Carroll Whittemore to MLK

Friday, September 25, 1964

Carroll Whittemore inquires about a promotion for Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" to be distributed to roughly 60,000 clergymen. He further requests a photograph of Dr. King to be used for publicity purposes, in a gallery of outstanding ministers.

The Future of Integration

Wednesday, November 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses the issue of the Future of Integration to an assembly at the State University of Iowa on November 11, 1959.

Morehouse Introduction to Philosophy Notes

These typed notes from Dr. King’s early years at Morehouse College are for an Introduction to Philosophy course led by Professor Samuel Williams. King outlines the topic of highest ends: motive and standard, changing and unchanging morality, and reason and emotion that determine the standard.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Gunnar Jahn

Monday, September 11, 1967

Dr. King authorizes Philip Noel-Baker and Pater George Dominique Pire to represent him in a delegation seeking Vietnam peace negotiations.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967

Co-Chairman Julian Bond welcomes Dr. King and other members of the SCLC to the National Conference for New Politics. Bond also comments on past civil rights victories, and he mentions future organizational directions.

Letter from Benjamin Conklin to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Mr. Conklin writes this letter urging Rev. Abernathy to rethink the decision to proceed with the Peoples March on Washington. He is concerned that with the recent assassination of Dr. King this action will only alienate Congress and the American public. Hence the march could cause more bloodshed.

God

Dr. King cites "Totem and Tabu" and "The Future of an Illusion" for Sigmund Freud's view on the origin of the idea of God.

Letter from Dr. King's Secretary, Maude L. Ballou

In this standard response letter, Dr. King's personal secretary highlighted the progress made in his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem. It also notes that Dr. King would respond to his many "well wishes", once he had been cleared by his physicians.

Letter from Carl Albert to MLK

Friday, October 20, 1967

In this letter, U.S. Congressman Carl Albert offers his gratitude to Dr. King regarding a letter he sent to him about problems in the country.

Telegram from Lavinia Underwood to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965

Lavinia Underwood writes Dr. King to discourage the possibility of a march that could strain relationships with white people.

The Sickness of our Society

Dr. King describes three points that he claims as symptoms of the "Sickness of Our Society." These points include a suicide rate of one every twenty-seven minutes, more than half a million Americans in mental hospitals and three-quarters of a million with alcohol problems.

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Seventh Biennial Religious Conference

This is a program for the seventh Biennial Religious Conference at Princeton University. Initially conceived shortly after World War II, the conference continues to confront important issues of human life. Under the leadership of the Student Christian Association, "Integration: Conscience in Crisis" will take place over a span of four days. Topics of the conference include "the historical and social as well as the judicial, international, and theological" implications of segregation and integration.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King records Friedrich Schleiermacher's views on religion, sin and redemption.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James P. Dixon of Antioch College

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Dr. James Dixon to express Dr. King's joy in his ability to accept Dr. Dixon's invitation to speak at Antioch College's commencement.

Letter from Samuel F. Daly to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

The author suggests Dr. King reclaim his leadership of the civil rights movement from Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown.

Highlander Folk School April 1961 News Release

Monday, April 3, 1961

The Citizen Education Program efforts and past accomplishments are outlined in this document.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Supporters

Ralph Abernathy, Treasurer of the SCLC, informs SCLC supporters of Dr. King's newly published book, "Strength To Love." He explains that Dr. King has assigned a large portion of the royalties to further the work of the SCLC and urges supporters to order the book.

Letter from the Lamar W. Sessoms Family to MLK

Sunday, June 25, 1967

In this letter, the Sessoms family informs Dr. King that rural sections of Mississippi are systematically starving their Negro residents. The Sessoms family asks for Dr. King's advice and assistance in alleviating this problem.

Program From MLK's Nobel Peace Prize Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

This is the program from a Recognition Dinner honoring Dr. King sponsored by the Citizens of Atlanta following his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. It took place at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel and included an address by Dr. King.

Letter to MLK from Charles Weaver

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Charles Weaver sends a letter of support to Dr. King for all of his contributions to peace and describes him as the ideal Christian prophet.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Letter from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 6, 1967

David Wallace writes Dora McDonald and attaches contributions from Negro businessmen involved with Chicago's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"