Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"New Jersey (NJ)"

Press Release Regarding Child Development Group of Mississippi

Friday, September 30, 1966
Jackson, MS

The CDGM Board of Directors expresses their outrage over being replaced by the group "Action for Progress in Mississippi." They feel that Sargent Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed the group without their input and in violation of the OEO's stated policies.

Letter from MLK to Miss R. Berkenvelder

Monday, November 22, 1965

Dr. King writes to Miss Berkenvelder, agreeing that silent and non-active individuals maintained the severity of injustices. He further elaborates on his prayer that warriors will form who are committed to nonviolence and world peace.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack Delano

Tuesday, July 6, 1965
PUERTO RICO

Dr. King accepts Mr. Delano's invitation to appear for an hour on WIPR-TV during his visit to Puerto Rico.

The Meaning of Hope

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), GREECE, TURKEY, Mississippi (MS), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, CYPRUS, VIETNAM, NIGERIA

Dr. King delivered this sermon while pastoring Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In spite of the existence of racial injustice in America, Dr. King maintains hope for equality, and reminds the church of their responsibility to "keep the flame of hope burning."

Letter from Max Hess to MLK

Monday, May 14, 1962
California (CA)

Mr. Hess expresses his sincere admiration for Dr. King stating, "you have done more than stood fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free."

Man

Dr. King writes on "man" and considers the evolutionary thinking behind "the survival of the fit."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This letter addressed to Dr. King criticizes his beliefs in equality and justice. The anonymous author states that "we are living under devil law" and "justice belongs only to the devil." He or she continues, arguing that schools corrupt children, filling their brains with "devil wisdom and devil justice and devil love."

Letter from Student Michael Chernoby to MLK

Saturday, May 1, 1965
Michigan (MI), Selma, AL

Michael Chernoby, a student at West Catholic High School, offers his support to Dr. King and the movement by choosing social work as a profession. According to Chernoby, "If I can do only a fraction of the good that you have done for mankind I will consider myself a success."

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

INDIA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Virginia (VA), Michigan (MI), Alabama (AL), New Hampshire (NH)

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

Telegram from Linda Gortmaker to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Linda Gortmaker requests an interview with Dr. King for the Proviso West Profile.

Letter from Jerome Davis to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966
Connecticut (CT), INDIA, New York, NY, VIETNAM

Jerome Davis invites Dr. King to receive the Gandhi Peace Award. The Gandhi Foundation wants to give Dr. King the award alongside U.S. Senator Fulbright.

Letter from James Allen to MLK

Wednesday, April 6, 1966
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

James Allen expresses his opinion of the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy to illustrate God's perfection.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962
South Africa, CANADA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), London, England, GHANA, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.

Letter from Reverend V. W. Glanton to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967
New York (NY)

Reverend V. W. Glanton encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC after receiving communications about voter registration initiatives in the South.

Letter from Clara Sturgas Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1961
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Clara Sturgas Johnson sends Dr. King a Christmas card with an enclosed article about the integration marches in Albany, Georgia.

SCLC Northern City Tour

Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ)

SCLC provides an organizational manual that outlines details regarding their Northern city tour. They are traveling to cities in the northern United States in order to assess social conditions and build relationships amongst civil rights leadership. The manual also provides tour dates and suggestions for organizing the tour.

The Future of Integration

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King requests that President Kennedy give full consideration to judges William Hastie and Thurgood Marshall for appointment to the US Supreme Court.

Actual Occasions

Dr. King quotes philosopher Alfred North Whitehead's "Religion in the Making." He interprets the phases in events and how such events are perceived.

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Democracy

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness" on the subject of democracy.

Telegram from MLK to the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne

Monday, February 27, 1967
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. Kings sends a telegram notifying the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne in England of his acceptance of their honorary degree.

Mastering Ourselves

"Mastering Ourselves" is Dr. King's exploration of the inner struggle for good and evil that occurs within every human's experience. Dr. King asserts that this "dualism" can sometimes cause good people to do bad things and bad people to do good things. According to Dr. King, this can only be overcome through identifying and replacing one's own weaknesses. He also suggests finding a profitable way to use leisure time coupled with a devotional life and continuous prayer.

Letter from Aziz Shihab to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967
JORDAN, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Aziz Shihab offers the services of National Tours of Jordan in arranging Dr. King's trip to the Holy Land.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. N. C. Burtenshaw

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King sends his condolence to Rev. Burtenshaw of the Catholic Archdioceses of Atlanta for the death of Archbishop Hallinan.

Farewell Statement by MLK

Monday, March 9, 1959
INDIA

Dr. King writes a farewell statement to the people of India thanking them for their hospitality towards him, Mrs. King and Dr. Reddick. Dr. King pleas for world peace and asserts that India should take the lead in the call for universal disarmament.