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"New Orleans, LA"

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Friedman

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Oregon (OR)

In this letter Ms. Dora McDonald informs Mr. Friedman of the University of Oregon that Dr. King's schedule will not allow for a contribution to "Forensic Quarterly". Such regrets were increasingly frequent occurrences as Dr. King’s prominence and workload grew.

Telegram from MLK to L. Venchael Booth

Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King congratulates Dr. Booth on receiving the Doctor of Divinity degree from Morehouse College.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
CANADA

A representative of the Canadian Friends Service Committee, a subcommittee of The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Canada, writes Dr. King to invite him to a "Conference for Diplomats." The sender tells Dr. King that the Conference will take place in Portland, Ontario, and emphasizes Human Rights Year. He asks Dr. King to consider being the keynote speaker for the event.

Letter from Cirilo McSween to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

Cirilo McSween congratulates Dr. King for the reorganization of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Joseph Lowery to Wyatt Walker

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Reverend Joseph E. Lowery writes to Reverend Wyatt Walker acknowledging his support of Walker's "sacrifice in behalf of freedom and justice for all."

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Letter from Arthur Abba Goldberg to Dr. King about Conducting Seminars for SCLC

Friday, January 12, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

Arthur Abba Goldberg, Deputy Attorney General for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs and the Housing Finance Agency is sending a copy of his resume to Dr. King, and expresses his interest in conducting seminars in the field of housing or housing finance.

Critique of the Social Gospel

Dr. King used this outline while studying at Crozer Theological Seminary. The topics listed include: Social Contribution to Christianity, Contribution to Christian Social Philosophy, and the Sore Points of the Social Gospel.

Letter from Berwyn Jones to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Berwyn Jones offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his strong stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The letter is written a day after Dr. King makes his famous speech entitled "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" at Riverside Church in New York.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967
Atlantic City, NJ, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C.

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

Letter from M. L. Phillips to MLK

Sunday, October 22, 1967
Tennessee (TN)

In this letter, Mrs. Phillips writes Dr. King to inform him that she enjoys listening to him speak on the radio.

Letter from Robert L. Tucker Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967
New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Robert Tucker inquires about Dr. King's views on Adam Clayton Powell and his position in Washington. Tucker states that he has great respect for Dr. King, which is why he wants clarity on his sentiments regarding the Powell controversy.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Francis Robinson

Wednesday, May 25, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King expresses her appreciation for the opera tickets that Mr. Robinson gave to her and Dr. King.

Letter from Harris McDowell, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Representative Harris McDowell, Jr. writes Dr. King stating that he voted against seating the Mississippi delegation. McDowell states, "I appreciate having your views regarding this important problem."

MLK on the Seating of Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Georgia State Legislature has refused to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King expresses his disdain for the social injustice. His plan of action is to combat this prejudice by rallying members of the white and black community to engage in protest.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
New York, NY

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the German edition of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", published by Econ Verlag, for the period 1/1/65 to 12/31/65.

Letter from Hunn Guelde to MLK

Saturday, October 1, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Hunn Guelde inquires about a claim made by the FBI in regards to Dr. King.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1968
NIGERIA, New York, NY

Roy Wilkins, of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, wrote Dr. King to explain his increasing concern over the violence in Nigeria. Wilkins requests Dr. King's presence for a meeting with Nigerian Leaders to discuss the possibilities of ending the hostilities.

Ex-West Sider

Chicago, IL

The author discusses their experiences with living in substandard housing in a low socioeconomic environment. The author also questions the racial focus of Chicago's appeasement to the Negro.

The Third Level of Ontological Concepts

Dr. King writes notes regarding the third level of ontological concepts, which "expresses the characteristics of being which are conditions of existence."

Love

Dr. King quotes Tertullian on the subject of love from “Adversus Marcionem.”

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Maryland (MD)

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Charles R. Bell Jr. about Beating of a Prisoner

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
California (CA)

In this correspondence, Dr. King offers thanks to Rev. Bell for his letter about the "horrible beating" of a Negro prisoner in Wetumpka, Alabama.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 8, 1964
NORWAY

In this letter,Joan Daves informs Dr. King that an offer for a Norwegian edition of "Strength to Love" has been made. Joan also mentions that contracts have been made for Dr.King to sign.

Letter from Henry Lee Gibson to MLK

Detroit, MI

Henry J. Gibson is aware of Dr. King's understanding of "God" and spirituality. Subsequent to a recent surgery, Mr. Gibson is now conscious of the meaning of being "born again." Praying enhanced his knowledge of God's presence in the human race which brought clarity for his perception of the "yellow man." Mr. Gibson requests to meet with Dr. King to further discuss his recent spiritual experiences and newly found wisdom.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964
New York (NY)

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."