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The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Moisa Bulboaca

Monday, May 16, 1966

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Louisiana native Moisa Bulboaca invites Dr. King to visit Romania. Ms. McDonald states Dr. King is involved in the freedom struggle and at the present time will be unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Wisconsin Democratic Senator Gaylord Nelson writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for his kind letter regarding the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Senator Nelson reports that many of his constituents were solidly in favor of the bill.

Letter from William Du Val to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

As a Regional Secretary for the United Presbyterian Church, Dr. King about his planned trip to Moscow. Du Val informs Dr. King that the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. sponsors a chaplaincy in Moscow and would like Dr. King to stop by for a visit.

Letter from Violet Panzram to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Panzram praises Dr. King for his "strong statements" against the Vietnam War and includes a contribution for his "peace efforts."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Maurice DeCuir to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

In this letter, Maurice De Cuir expresses his concern, in regard to race relations, as it pertains to government jobs in helping the economic status of the negro. He then informs Dr. King of the intent, of the Equal Opportunity Commission, to investigate the matter.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. B. Wilson

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Dr. King conveys gratitude to Rev. C. B. Wilson of Southern Baptist Church for a contribution to SCLC. King explains the increasing expenses of the Civil Rights Movement at a time when liberals are redirecting their attention to the peace issue.

Press Statement Regarding Crusade for Citizenship

Saturday, October 5, 1957

Dr. King delivers a statement surrounding the civil rights struggle of the Negro community and the appeals for justice to public officials. He asserts that in regards to the Prayer Pilgrimage, there cannot be a citizen whom does not have the right to vote. With the initiation of the Crusade for Citizenship, the citizenship of the Negro has the opportunity to be a reality.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

Letter from Amnesty International to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965

On behalf of Denmark's chapter of Amnesty International, Mr. Bent Ostergaard writes Dr. King extending a speaking invitation. He is hopeful that Dr. King will return to Europe and accept the invitation to speak to youth and instill in them the significance of justice.

Semi-Arianism

Dr. King records a definition of semi-Arianism.

Letter from Wilfred Laurier Husband to John B. Oakes of the New York Times

Friday, April 7, 1967

Wilfred Husband writes John Oakes, Editorial Page Editor of the New York Times, regarding an article. As a consistent reader of the Magazine, Husband expresses his displeasure with an article that refers to the civil right movement's attention to the war in Vietnam as "wasteful and self-defeating." Husband explains how war and civil rights are inseparable and that stating anything in opposition hurts the cause of the movement.

Letter from Stacey McCloud to MLK

Stacey McCloud writes to Dr. King suggesting that he, Stokley Carmichael and others relocate to Africa and march.

Letter from John Whyte to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966

John Whyte, an eighth grader, describes his class's fundraising efforts for the SCLC.

God (I Chronicles)

Dr. King interprets I Chronicles 16:14 as implying monotheism.

Letter from Moss Kendrix to MLK

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Mr. Kendrix wishes to meet with Dr. King to discuss a certain rumor concerning him and the Coca-Cola Company.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 27, 1964

Joan Daves sends three checks to Dr. King. The first check is an advance due from Harper and Row, the second represents an advance from NAL and the third is a partial payment from "Life."

Jeremiah

Dr. King records several scriptures from the biblical Book of Jeremiah.

Letter from Lynn Ewell to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. about Comments on College Course

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter Lynn Ewell inquires as to whether Dr. King will offer any comments pertaining to the college course "Education of the Adolescent" and the class research topic of "Building an Enduring Peace."

Letter from Juanita Turner to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966

35 year-old Juanita Turner writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help in her time of crisis. She has lived in Chicago for 12 years and suffers from epilepsy. She needs help finding a trustworthy attorney, a dependable doctor, and basic necessities.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Ex-West Sider

The author discusses their experiences with living in substandard housing in a low socioeconomic environment. The author also questions the racial focus of Chicago's appeasement to the Negro.

Letter from Jesse Thomas to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Jessie Thomas is writing to Dr. King to promote the development of a new urban community in the Rockdale area of Atlanta. Mr. Thomas states that the development would be revolutionary and a model for other cities if it were to be approved by the housing authorities. He urges Dr. King to support the project and help in the planning of producing this new area.

Housing Plan at Gadsden Is Upheld

Thursday, October 11, 1962

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Negroes in Gadsden, Alabama who wanted to stop urban redevelopment plan which would segregate the Negroes.

Letter from Ella Jackson to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

Miss Ella Jackson, a 7th grader, writes to Dr. King concerning his leadership and involvement in civil disobedience. She advises Dr. King to speak to someone in power, otherwise his actions will lead to war.

Letter From Paul Brest to Members of the SCLC

Monday, November 14, 1966

Paul Brest, on behalf of Marian E. Wright, alerts Dr. King and other SCLC staff members about legal initiatives to desegregate schools in Mississippi and other southern states.

MLK Report: Annual Address, MIA

Thursday, December 3, 1959

In his final address to the Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King gives a status report on the various initiatives of the organization. He also gives a final farewell in hopes that the MIA is challenged to continue to fight in the struggle for equality.

Abelard

Dr. King quotes 12th century French philosopher Peter Abelard on the relationship between doubt, inquiry and truth.

Letter from Nathan Green to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Here, Nathan Green requests to meet with Rev. Abernathy to discuss a plan that Green believes will be of "tremendous value" to their cause.

Letter from Glen Nixon to SCLC

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Glen Nixon offers to participate in the SCLC's Chicago project in order to gain a better understanding of Northern slums. Nixon asks to be referred to other programs and organizations, if his assistance is not needed in Chicago.