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Statement from American Jewish Congress Regarding the Bundy School-Decentralization Plan

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Murray A. Gordon, a New York lawyer and national vice president of the American Jewish Congress, endorses the Bundy School-Decentralization plan. Mr. Gordon believes that the reform is essential to good education and assures teachers that the plan will not violate their rights.

Letter from Wyatt Walker to Hy Resnick

Friday, December 8, 1961
New York (NY)

On behalf of Dr. King, Wyatt Walker thanks Hy Resnick and the Mount Vernon YM & YWHA for their efforts to raise money to aid the civil rights movement. He then suggests a number of entertainers that might be useful through Harry Belafonte's associations.

Morality and Religion

Dr. King quotes Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God."

Letter from MLK to Mr. J.G. Anoma

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Mr. Anoma for his monetary contribution to the SCLC. In addition, he praises Mr. Anoma for his poem entitled "Black Chicago". The poem addresses the current struggle faced by many "dark-skinned Americans" and reaffirms the aim of the SCLC-Chicago campaign.

Letter from James K. Mbuguah from MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1962

James Mbuguah is a young boy from Kenya who has been accepted into John Hopkins University. James is contacting Dr. King because he does not have the finances to attend the school and would like to receive assistance.

Letter from Jameas Lucas to MLK Regarding Legal Help

Louisiana (LA)

Mr. Lucas requests Dr. King's legal assistance regarding a manslaughter trial against a white man.

Healing Treatment from Aurora Maynard to Coretta S. King

Aurora Maynard sends her support to Mrs. Coretta Scott King in the form of a self-authored poem entitled "Healing Treatment."

Letter from MLK to Bruce Smith

Tuesday, June 23, 1964
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King responds to Mr. Smith's earlier letter, in which Smith objected to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. King recommends his book, "Why We Can't Wait" to Smith and offers his response to Smith's argument against the bill.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 11, 1967
New York (NY)

Gitta Badeker informs Dora McDonald of an offer from Santi Ando & Figli for the Italian rights to "Where Do We Go from Here," and includes administrative instructions on how to proceed.

Letter from Joani Kalmers to MLK

Saturday, July 15, 1967

Joani Kalmers, a senior at Thiel College, requests information from Dr. King and the SCLC regarding her thesis topic "Christianity and the Negro."

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend an urgent meeting of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights to discuss civil rights developments in the Senate. The 1964 Civil Rights Act was under debate at the time in the United States House of Representatives and Senate.

Telegram from Charles Webber to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Charles Webber, the AFL-CIO's representative for religious relations, sends this telegram of support to Dr. King during his incarceration.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

New York Mayor Wagner Remarks at Reception

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner honors Dr. King at a reception following a ceremony where he was presented the Medallion of Honor of the City of New York after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The Mayor especially commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership in nonviolence and the spirit of love, goodwill, and peacemaking that he brings to the struggle for racial justice.

The Limitation of Experience

Dr. King discusses the three sources of authority in religion: the church, the Bible, and experience. Dr. King cites the philosophical perception of an experience from Immanuel Kant's description. In addition, Dr. King compares different persons to associate the difference between age and experience.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Monday, July 22, 1963
Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI)

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Ruby Brown

Monday, April 4, 1966
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Ruby Brown of Detroit, Michigan to thank her for her letter regarding the civil rights struggle.

Wedding Ceremony Invitation

Sunday, August 16, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This document is an invitation to the wedding ceremony of Bertha Sue Alford and Mr. Charles A. Pinkston.

Letter from J. Campe to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"and "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, March 6, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter is enclosed a check and details of expenses for the Italian Edition of "Stride Toward Freedom and "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from James H. Meredith to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

James Meredith writes from Nigeria to congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Noble Peace Prize and emphasizes that the struggle for human rights is a world-wide struggle. Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the University of Mississippi, was at that time a post-graduate researcher in Nigeria.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Pelagianism"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines "Pelagianism". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from C.B. Atkins to MLK

Tuesday, June 12, 1962
New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA

In this document the writer thanks Dr. King for meeting with him concerning the proposed "Martin King album" and television series. The writer encloses a memorandum on consumer information and requests King's travel schedule.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962
Albany, GA, INDIA, New York (NY)

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966
Washington (WA), Montgomery, AL

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

Wednesday, March 23, 1966
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

Invitation from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, February 25, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter Harper & Row publishers are requesting Dr. King's presence at a seminar for clergymen, theologians, and laymen. The seminar will discuss how the ministry is affected by cultural changes in society. It will be a weekend retreat and Harper & Row are willing to assume all travel expenses.

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

Birmingham, AL

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.