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Telegram to Alan Reitman from MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Dr. King informs Alan Reitman of the American Civil Liberties Union that he will sign a statement opposing the House Un-American Activities Committee and the Senate Internal Securities Committee.

Letter from Charles H. Walter to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 29, 1962

Charles Walters notifies Dora McDonald that he is sending a copy of the current edition of Labor Today. Walters requests an 1100 word article and photo from Dr. King for the forthcoming issue.

The Philosophy Of Nonviolence And the Tactic Of Nonviolent Resistance

This document discusses the philosophy and tactic of nonviolence. The three nonviolent resisters discussed are Jesus, Gandhi, and Dr. King.

Letter from Oxford JACARI to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964

Frank R. Parker, Vice-Chairman of the Oxford Joint Action Committee Against Racial Intolerance (JACARI) extends yet another speaking invitation to Dr. King, emphasizing his eagerness to hear the message of non-violent resistance.

Letter to Rev. MLK, Sr. from Arlen Fuhlendorf

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mrs. Arlen Fuhlendorkr writes to Rev. King Sr., expressing deep sympathy for the death of Dr. King. She also wanted to convey to Rev. King that he should be proud of the great work his son did for humanity.

Letter from Herbert G. Cave to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Director Dr. Herbert G. Cave represents the Department of Anesthesiology at the Harlem Hospital Center in congratulating Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Seven years earlier, in 1958, Dr. King had been a surgical patient of the hospital due to being stabbed with a letter opener while on a book tour.

My Dream: Peace - God's Business and Man's

Saturday, November 27, 1965

This document is a draft in progress of an article wrote for the Chicago Defender. Dr. King conveys his desire for war to be eliminated as an option to solve the nation's problems. He feels that full equality will never come to pass unless solutions involving violence are deemed to be methods of the past.

Letter from David S. Tillson MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr. Davis S. Tillson congratulates Dr. King on his statement regarding foreign policy.

Congressional Record: The President's Housing Bill, or, How To Succeed in Politics Without Really Trying

Senator Charles Percy forwarded this article, published in the Congressional Record, to Dr. King. The article discusses President Johnson's attempted housing referendum, known as the Fair Housing Bill, in March of 1968.

Letter from Gaye Breitel to MLK

Gaye Breitel, a ten year old from New York, writes Dr. King to request an autographed photo or book with a recent picture.

Letter from William E. Duncan to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

The branch director of a Chicago based youth center welcomes Dr. King to their neighborhood. William Duncan conveys his support to Dr. King's initiatives for community revitalization. His letter was written at the beginning of a major campaign undertaken by Dr. King and SCLC to campaign for open housing in Chicago.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Francis Robinson

Wednesday, May 25, 1966

Mrs. King expresses her appreciation for the opera tickets that Mr. Robinson gave to her and Dr. King.

CIC Press Release: Hilliard to Head Catholic Testimonial for MLK

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

The Catholic Interracial Council releases a statement announcing Raymond M. Hilliard as the Chairman of the 1964 John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. During the event, Dr. King will be honored for his leadership and dedication to the civil rights struggle. Hilliard, whom President Johnson named to the National Citizens Committee for Community Relations to advise on the implementation of civil rights legislation, called Dr. King's work "inspired and truly Christian" and said that the CIC was honored to celebrate him.

Blank Jury Questionnaire to MLK

This Jury Questionaire was sent to Dr. King by The Fulton County Court House.

Augustine (Concept of Evil)

Dr. King quotes theologian St. Augustine's "Confessions."

The Klansman Article Regarding MLK

This article on Dr. King appears in "The Klansman," a publication of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan of Mississippi. Dr. King, who is here referred to as the "Reverend Riot Inciter" and "Riot King," is alleged to have caused civil unrest in Leflore County and Greenwood, Mississippi.

Letter from the South African Consulate

Friday, February 11, 1966

The South African Consulate-General informs Dr. King that his application for a visa to enter South Africa is being taken into consideration. He informs Dr. King that he would be informed shortly of the decision regarding his request.

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Thursday, December 15, 1966

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

Gods Existence

Abstract: Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Notecard Containing the Definition of Evil

In this notecard Dr. King details the reason for suffering. He references notes from "City of God" by St. Augustine.

Civil Rights Drive by SCLC and Other Groups Wins Open Housing Victory in Louisville

Saturday, December 30, 1967

This 1967 SCLC news release details the passage of a law forbidding racial discrimination in housing in Louisville, Kentucky. It also details the role that SCLC and its sister organizations had in bring about this legislation.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

Monday, August 29, 1966

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

Letter from Ann Bettiglan to MLK

Monday, August 16, 1965

Ann Bettiglan writes Dr. King informing him that her friend Daniza Thompson is in need of financial help. She gives Dr. King her friend's address and phone number so that he can assist her.

Letter to Mrs. Levi Hamiliton from Dora McDonald

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Levi Hamilton that Dr. King perceived the mayor's appointment of a bi-racial committee as ""heartwarming." Furthermore, Ms. McDonald notifies Mrs. Hamilton that Dr. King is unable to commit to a date to come and speak in Goldsboro.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Irving J. Block

Monday, May 16, 1966

Dora McDonald requests Rabbi Irving J. Block contact Stanley Levison, Dr. King's attorney in New York City.

Prayer Pilgrimage

Various quotes are cited surrounding Dr. King's perception on love, nonviolence, spirituality, Montgomery, and more. Dr. King elaborates on the history of Montgomery and its direct relation to slavery. Ebony Magazine releases the exclusive eight-point "Plan for Freedom" for Montgomery, calling Negros to mobilize for an all-out assault on segregation."The Death of Evil' is also cited which correlates such evil with details from the book of Exodus.

Letter from The Very Rev. Raymond J. Swords to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Fr. Raymond J. Swords, S.J., President of the College of the Holy Cross, writes to Dr. King, expressing how joyous he was to hear that King was selected as the 1964 Nobel Prize Winner.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Oliver Kannon

Wednesday, July 11, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Kannon that Dr. King will be unable to accept the Easton NAACP's invitation to speak.