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Telegram from the SCLC to Rev. John Golden

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Staff from the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program telegram Reverend John Golden informing him that all expenses will be paid for the trip to Georgia.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Letter from August Schou to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA

August Schou, the Director of the Nobel Committee, sends Dr. King more information regarding the 1964 Peace Prize Award Ceremony. Logistics such as the time, location and instructions for his speech are described in this letter.

Letter from Sharon J. Brown to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Sharon Brown, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King how his congregation worships. She explains that this question is for a class project.

United Nations Seminar Brochure

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), CHINA

This pamphlet offers information on the registration, time, place, and cost of the United Nations Seminar being held in Washington D.C from October 17-21, 1966. Enclosed is a registration form for the Seminar.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), West Virginia (WV), Birmingham, AL, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

Conscience

Dr. King ponders the meaning of the word 'conscience.' He questions the nature of conscience and ultimately sees it as a necessary sense of obligation that makes a difference in the life of a civilization.

Letter from Mose Pleasure, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968
Memphis, TN, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Pleasure writes Dr. King to inform him of his decision not to accept employment with SCLC. He refers to an earlier visit with Dr. King and friends in Atlanta, and comments that the group's enthusiasm bodes well for the upcoming Poor People's March on Washington.

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

Letter from Marilyn Thomburgh to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Marilyn Thomburgh writes Dr. King addressing the issue of polluted water in the US and asks why there is nothing done about this matter.

Pride

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine and C. S. Lewis on pride.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Postcard from Ollie Wilson to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Brooklyn, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Ollie Wilson expresses his opinion regarding war and evolution to Dr. King.

Letter to MLK from the Women For: Organization

Thursday, May 25, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

The WOMEN FOR: organization sent Dr. King a letter with their enclosed policy regarding the conflict in Vietnam. Women For: is a non-partisan civic organization that is actively involved in local, national, and international affairs. The group of over 2,000 women believed, unanimously, that the United States should cease all military occupation.

Letter from Dolores H. Autuore to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
New York, NY

Mrs. Autuore encloses some checks that were misplaced temporarily while offering her gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to Pine Island.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. V. Willis

Tuesday, February 20, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Coatesville, Pennsylvania in support of the NAACP. He explains that his recent commitment to the SCLC Board to tour the South for a voter registration campaign prevents him from accepting any additional speaking engagements.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, June 5, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this document, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dora McDonald regarding receipt of a check. Mays also discusses the role he played in bringing McDonald to Atlanta.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
California (CA), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter of Support from Dr. May Chinn to MLK

Tuesday, November 5, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

On a recent vacation, Dr. Chinn attended a "friends meeting" in a small town outside of Williamsburg, Pennsylvania. Chinn noticed that Dr. King's teachings and spiritual dedication had profoundly influenced that community. He states that Dr. King has inspired people both in that town and around the world, and that he is "everyone's leader."

Letter from Juanita Kurtza to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Juanita Kurtza sends Dr. King a list of scriptures to encourage him in his work. She also apologizes for her inability to send money.

Telegram from MLK Congratulating Georgia Legislators Elect

Friday, June 18, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King congratulates Grace Hamilton, William Alexander, Julian Bond, J. D. Grier, and J. C. Daugherty on their recent election to the Legislature of the State of Georgia. He offers his support in "our quest for freedom and human dignity."

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Abram Heschel

Friday, March 29, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Harry Wachtel, legal counsel to Dr. King, expresses his gratitude to leading Jewish theologian Rabbi Heschel for his great works.

Note Card Entitled Atheism

Atheism is cited from Sparrier in this note card.

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Oregon (OR), VIETNAM, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Letter from Charles Johnson to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Charles Johnson offers suggestions to Dr. King about job creation following the violent riots that took place in the summer of 1967. He proposes that the federal government intervene and allow younger potential workers to enter into the job force and retire those who have been employed a long time. According to Johnson, employing these young workers will eliminate the uprisings seen in various urban cities around the United States.

Letter from MLK to Asbury Howard

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
Denver, CO, Colorado (CO)

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Howard for a recent letter which informed him of a proposed merger of labor unions.

Letter from Mr. Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter Mr. Canfield Of Harper & Row, Publishers, informs Dr. King that a certificate of recognition from the National Conference of Christians and Jews for "Where Do We Go From Here?" is being sent to him as an award. Mr. Canfield expresses his belief the book will continue to sell.