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Letter from Walter E. Sanford to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Walter Sanford, Labor Adviser for the United States Department of Labor, writes Dora McDonald regarding Mr. John Dube's visit to Atlanta. In Dr. King's absence, Dube will meet with his Executive Assistant, Wyatt T. Walker, to discuss the structure of the SCLC and techniques employed to "promote improved civil rights for the Negroes in the US."

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

An Appreciation Dinner

Monday, December 27, 1965

This dinner salutes the outstanding service of the SCLC staff. It includes menu items for the gathering as well as a schedule of guest speakers and attendees.

My Dream: Peace - God's Business and Man's

Saturday, November 27, 1965

This document is a draft in progress of an article wrote for the Chicago Defender. Dr. King conveys his desire for war to be eliminated as an option to solve the nation's problems. He feels that full equality will never come to pass unless solutions involving violence are deemed to be methods of the past.

Letter from Reverend James A. Pike to MLK

Friday, September 9, 1966

Reverend James A. Pike, a famous American Episcopal Bishop, writes to Dr. King regarding an appearance at the University of Cambridge's Great St. Mary's.

Letter from Wilma Wolsink to MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1966

Wilma Wolsink, an eleven-year-old girl from Holland, writes to Dr. King to express her support. She also requests an autographed photograph.

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

Saturday, November 24, 1962

Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

Telegram from James A. Dombrowski to Lindsay Almond Jr.

James A. Dombrowski urges J. Lindsay Almond to take a stand against segregation in the city of Lynchburg. This urgency emerged as a result of the jailing of six students who sitting-in at a local diner.

Letter from MLK to C. Anderson Davis

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King replies to Reverend Davis' invitation to speak at the West Virginia Emancipation Proclamation Committee event in Bluefield, West Virginia. Dr. King declines the invitation citing his he has already accepted the maximum number of speaking engagements for the next ten to twelve months. Dr. King does extend his appreciation for the Committee's moral and financial support of the work done by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

SCLC Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

This is the agenda for a board meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Savannah, Georgia.

Letter from MLK to George Bass

Friday, June 17, 1966

Dr. King responds to Mrs. George Bass' recent letter inviting him to speak at the annual convention of the Planned Parenthood Association. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation because his schedule is booked for the entire month of January.

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Text of Speech Delivered at Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This speech, given by Dr. King at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C, brings attention to the current state of oppression of Negro men and women in 1963.

Anonymous Letter to Charles C. Diggs Jr.

This anonymous letter to Congressman Charles Diggs, Jr. of Michigan details the grievances suffered by Negro and Caucasian females in the U.S. Army. The authors assert that they routinely are subjected to segregation in public accommodations and are denied equal opportunity for promotion and reenlistment.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Postcard from Ollie Wilson to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Ollie Wilson expresses his opinion regarding war and evolution to Dr. King.

Letter to Ralph David Abernathy from Allen L. Johnson

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Southern Christian Leadership Conference board member Allen L. Johnson wrote this letter to Rev. Abernathy shortly after Dr. King's death. Johnson expressed his support of Rev. Abernathy's leadership of the organization.

Slum Building Seized

This article includes multiple viewpoints regarding Dr. King and the seizure of a slum building in Chicago.

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

Letter from P. D. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

P. D. Thompson, a member of the South African Institute of Race Relations, writes to Dr. King seeking help with South Africa's race relations.

Science (Definition)

Dr. King records a definition of science.

Youth in the World of Work

Daniel H. Kruger describes many aspects of current labor trends in regards to automation, education and employment ratios in the United States.

Telegram from Berry Gordy, Jr. to MLK

President of Motown Record Corporation, Berry Gordy, Jr., awaits Dr. King's decision on the album, "The Great March on Washington."

Satan

Dr. King records a note on the Bok of Job, chapter 1, verses 11 and 12.

Letter from David Kairys to MLK and SCLC

Saturday, June 17, 1967

Mr. Kairys writes Dr. King to express his support of Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam War as well as Dr. King's approach to civil rights issues.

Letter from A. Dale Fiers to MLK

Saturday, January 15, 1966

A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary for the International Convention of Christian Churches, informs Dr. King of the order of events to take place at the Dallas Assembly of the International Convention on September 25, 1966.

Letter from Mr. Weston to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Mr. Weston writes Dr. King offering him advice regarding the Civil Rights Movement and how to seek peace between whites and blacks.

Letter from Samuel Kirk to President Johnson

Friday, December 30, 1966

Mr. Kirk, Director of the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children, writes to President Johnson expressing his desire for peace in Vietnam. Kirk suggests that Johnson appoint a Peace Commission consisting of Dr. King and others to help create solutions for ending the war.

Letter from Don Edwards to MLK

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Representative Don Edwards of California sends his gratitude to Dr. King for a recent letter. Edwards informs Dr. King that they are currently drafting legislation to amend the Civil Rights Act.