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Resource Teachers

This document lists the eight duties of Resource Teachers, and includes targeted instruction for how this group should interact with base teachers and students.

Statement on Warnings Issued by U Thant

Sunday, May 21, 1967
Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

On behalf of Secretary General of the United Nations U Thant, this letter serves as a call to action for every government, organization, and organ of world opinion to take a firm stance against American military escalation in the Vietnam conflict.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Vernon W. Stone

Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King commends Dr. Vernon Stone on his superb teaching career and upcoming move to become the first Negro professor at a University in Atlanta.

SCLC Staff

Thursday, March 9, 1967
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

This is a list of the SCLC staff members, their positions, and their responsibilities.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967
VIETNAM, Geneva, Switzerland, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

Kinloch Citizen's Self-Survey Committee

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Missouri (MO)

A Police Advisory Committee releases its recommendations for the Kinloch, Missouri Police Department.

Unity West Program

Thursday, June 1, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Milwaukee, WI, Washington (WA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Unity West issues this worship program for June 1967.

A Letter to MLK to President Lyndon B. Johsnon

Friday, April 13, 1962
Atlanta, GA

In a letter to MLK, President Lyndon B. Johnson addresses the issue of Federal employment in Atlanta. Johnson informs King of the previous meeting held with the Civil Service Commission and the steps being taken to move forward.

MLK's Remarks to Swedish Audience

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Los Angeles, CA, SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

Dr. King delivers a speech in Stockholm, Sweden applauding the nation's commitment and support of racial justice in America. King further articulates his belief that despite several social ills people will "be able to sing together in the not too distant future."

Incarnation

Here, Dr. King notes that the problem of Jesus' Incarnation "boils down to" one single question.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Denver, CO, San Francisco, CA, Arizona (AZ), Texas (TX), Missouri (MO), Pennsylvania (PA), Cincinnati, OH, Cleveland, OH, Norfolk, VA, Richmond, VA

Here, Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, forwards a list of proposed touring cities to Mr. Harry Belafonte. She also comments on a recent special he did entitled, "Laughter."

Sin

Dr. King references Dewey and his view of evil.

Invitation for the Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

Atlanta, GA

This is an invitation for the Inauguration of the seventh president of Morehouse College.

His Attitude Toward Higher Criticism

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Immanuel Kant's book "The Preface to the First Edition.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Ross D. Davis

Friday, December 3, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak to the Woman's National Democratic Club in Washington, D.C. He explains that he has an engagement in a different part of the country on the same date.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Maurice A. Dawkins is requesting Dr. King to attend an infomal meeting, along with other civil rights leaders, to discuss the War on Proverty in the South.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956
New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chester, PA, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Sunday, April 9, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter addressed to Rev. Martin "Coon" King, the writer--who does not identify himself-- maintains Dr. King is "damag[ing]...the negroes [sic] cause" by focusing on giving them "handouts," as opposed to "improv[ing] their morals."

Invitation from Haile Selassie I to MLK

ETHIOPIA

Haile Selassie I, emperor of Ethiopia, invites Dr. King to his birthday anniversary at the Shoreham Hotel.

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Holiday Card from the McKinneys

Reverend S. Berry McKinney, his wife and daughter sent Dr. King this holiday card.

In a Word- Now

Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

This is a draft of the article "In a Word-Now" written by Dr. King. It was published in the New York Times on September 29, 1963.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Thompson

This letter, addressed to a Mrs. Thompson, illuminates the issue of negros who have found themselves employed as mailmen despite being privi to some skill set obtained though either a B.A. or B.S. degree.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Prospectus for Department of Affiliates

Herbert Coulton, Director of Affiliates, gives members of the SCLC a list of requirements for positions within the organization.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Smock

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King apologizes for responding to Mrs. Smock's letter over a year late, but extends gratitude for the invitation to her art exhibition. Dr. King affirms that if he is in Atlanta during the time of her exhibition he and Coretta will attend.

Letter from MLK to Lester Kendel Jackson

Wednesday, July 17, 1963
Indiana (IN)

Dr. King sends a check to Dr. Jackson at St. Paul Baptist Church in Gary, Indiana, to aid with reconstruction of the church.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Raphael Demos

Friday, July 19, 1963
Cambridge, MA

Dr. King writes Harvard University professor Dr. Demos confirming his enrollment in the professor's Philosophy of Plato course. He also thanks Dr. Demos for his "kind words" regarding an article he wrote for "Christianity and Crisis." In addition, Dr. King further extends his regards to Mrs. Demos, whom Mrs. King studied with at the New England Conservatory of Music.

Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963
Oregon (OR), VIETNAM, GERMANY, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, CUBA, SOUTH AFRICA

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.