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Letter from Emily Ann Fortson to MLK

Wednesday, June 29, 1966

Emily Fortson, of Concreta Tours, informs Dr. King of the developing proposal related to his upcoming Holy Land Pilgrimage.

Executive Orders

Dr. King drafts numerous directives pertaining to the 1964 expenses of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. The document outlines developments that occurred in pursuits such as voter registration and Operation Breadbasket. The piece concludes with commentary on the future of the organization, specifically "deeper involvement in political action."

Address to the Montgomery Improvement Association

Monday, December 5, 1955

Dr. King discusses the inequality in America and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He says that he will work to eliminate discrimination in Montgomery and he encourages the audience to participate and actively seek change as well.

Letter from MLK to U Thant

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks U Thant, the Secretary General of the United Nations, for a luncheon in Oslo, and wishes him well as he recovers from an illness.

Letter from Howard W. Rogerson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Howard W. Rogerson of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights writes Dr. King seeking his opinion and advice regarding a "technical publication for disseminating information on current activities and publications in the field of civil rights."

Letter from Curtis W. Harris to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

Curtis W. Harris demands that the United States Justice Department intervene in Virginia's school systems to prevent discrimination in how tax funds are used for public education. Mr. Harris reports that Negroes continue to be excluded from serving on local school boards and this exclusion "constitutes discrimination and is a violation of Federal law."

Letter from Mrs. Robert Hall to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Mrs. Hall suggests a letter writing campaign for young people as a more effective and less intimidating means of demonstrating than petitions and marches.

Materialism

Dr. King references author Emil Carl Wilm's publication, "The Problem of Religion."

Statement Before the Credentials Committee Democratic National Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a plea to the Democratic National Committee to provide a delegate from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party so that there may be equal representation within the state. Dr. King's feels that by providing a delegate it may discontinue the prevention of political participation of African Americans in Mississippi.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

Royalty Statement

Friday, June 30, 1967

This statement provides figures of terms and earned royalties for the German-language edition "Strength to Love."

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

Letter from MLK to Jesse W. Furlow

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Dr. King disagrees with Mr. Furlow's theory that "we are the victims of a Catholic conspiracy."

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Saturday, July 3, 1965

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

Letter from Rev. Canon John S. Yaryan to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

Rev. Yaryan writes to confirm Dr. King's appearance at the Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. He asks that Dr. King preach not only for their morning service, but also the evening worhsip service as well.

Letter from Ben-Zion Ilan to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

The American Representative of the General Federation of Labor in Israel writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize. He also reiterates a request for Dr. King to visit Israel as the guest of Histadrut, the Executive Director of the organization.

Biographical Sketch of Andrew Young

This document outlines the education, pastoral, and vocational experience of Andrew J. Young, Executive Director of the SCLC.

Headquarters Torched After Milwaukee March

This article discusses the destruction of the Freedom House, home of the Milwaukee Youth Council of the N.A.A.C.P. The Freedom House was destroyed by a firebomb, which entered through the front window. Young Negro housing demonstrators attempted to hold a rally on the southside of Milwaukee in support of an open housing ordinance, only to return to a destroyed headquarters. This article was written by Milwaukee's Associated Press.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Letter from MLK to Miss Joanne Adams

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to a letter from Joanne Adams, a teenager from Central High School, stating that letters like hers from young people around the country inspire him that youth are so conscious of the issues that affect our world.

Letter from Mrs. Thomas Walsh to Dr. Roy Enquist

Monday, June 5, 1967

Mrs. Thomas Walsh writes to Dr. Roy J. Enquist regarding an invitation for Dr. King to speak at St. Mary's University, St. Edward's University and the Texas Lutheran College.

Race Problem

Dr. King discusses the solution to the race problem, citing Reinhold Niebuhr's view that human methods are irrational.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Smock

Dr. King apologizes for responding to Mrs. Smock's letter over a year late, but extends gratitude for the invitation to her art exhibition. Dr. King affirms that if he is in Atlanta during the time of her exhibition he and Coretta will attend.

Letter from Grace Newman to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Ms. Grace Newman, National Chairman of the Fort Hood Three Defense Committee, informs Rev. Abernathy of her support of his leadership in SCLC. In honor of her pledge to Dr. King, she promises to continue working to organize poor communities in Puerto Rico.

MLK Memorandum on SCLC Direct Action Plans

In this confidential memorandum, Dr. King outlines SCLC’s direct action program for Birmingham, Alabama and Danville, Virginia. For each community, he states the challenges, defines goals, and then provides detailed steps to be taken and also staff assignments. He promises to outline his plan for Montgomery, Alabama in a few days.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Letter from John Madigan to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Madigan writes to Dr. King thanking him for his participation in a CBS Television program "At Random." He invites Dr. King to participate in another program entitled "Target: News."

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.