Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"New York (NY)"

The Baccalaureate Service of Keuka College

Sunday, June 16, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King gives the baccalaureate sermon for Keuka College on June 16, 1963.

Letter from Samuel S. Backlar to MLK

Friday, October 3, 1958
New York (NY)

Samuel S. Backlar, Chairman of the American Legion New York County Organization, writes Dr. King wishing him a "speedy recovery" and invites him to speak at Abraham Lincoln's 150th birthday celebration.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bob Alpert

Thursday, March 21, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald writes Bob Alpert of the Hotel and Club Employees Union to thank him for his previous correspondence. Miss McDonald informs Mr. Alpert that she cannot fulfill his request to receive additional copies of Dr. King's article that was published in the "Nation." However, she recommends that Alpert communicate with Carey McWilliams, editor of the "Nation," to receive those copies.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLk

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

In this document, Dr. King's literary agent, Joan Daves, forwards a royalty statement, for the French editions of Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

Sacrifice

Dr. King explains that Isaiah 1:11 means God can’t be appeased by sacrifice but demands righteous living.

Operation Breadbasket Cost Breakdown

Operation Breadbasket was a division of the SCLC founded in 1962 and operated by Reverend Fred C. Bennett. The project was dedicated to improving the economic conditions of black communities across the United States. This is an estimated cost breakdown for the operation. It includes expected wages, salaries, transportation, insurance, and office supplies for running the project for one year.

Immortality

In this series of note cards, Dr. King interprets Ecclesiastes 3:18-19 as "a clear explicit rejection of immortality."

Scientific Method (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes Henry P. Van Dusen’s article “How Do We Know?” from The Christian Century on the scientific method as central to Henry Nelson Wieman’s thinking. He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Letter from Rev. Max F. Daskam to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

The Unitarian Church of Germantown requests the return of Dr. King's presence for their Pulpit Schedule of the current year. Years have passed since Dr. King has visited and the church "would rejoice" if he could provide a date.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter from MLK to Bert Onne

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, Chicago, IL

Dr. King takes an opportunity to thank Bert Onne of Stockholm for his assistance in supporting the SCLC's Freedom Movement in Chicago.

Albany Movement Statement

Sunday, July 1, 1962
Albany, GA

This statement is written on behalf of people of faith who have come to support the Albany Movement. The ills experienced by the Negro community in Albany are rooted in racial separation, it says. The document requests a meeting with the City Commission to review their response to peaceful protest, clarification of the City’s position on an ICC ruling on segregated buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to make recommendations on desegregation.

Schleiermacher (Religion More Than Dogma)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Chuck Sumner Stone Jr. to MLK

Monday, May 28, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Chuck Stone, Editor of the Washington Afro-American, instructs Dr. King to review their publication regarding the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He wishes Dr. King luck in his endeavors and prays for many more men of his stature.

Death

Dr. King recalls a quote from British prime minister Winston Churchill and his tribute to King George VI.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Florence Wright

Wednesday, August 1, 1962
INDIA, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Dora McDonald informs Florence Wright that Dr. King is currently in jail in Albany, Georgia. Dora McDonald reassures Miss Wright that her encouraging words will mean a great deal to Dr. King.

Letter from Cantor Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 1, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom writes to Miss McDonald requesting some of Dr. King's biographical material. Cantor Mendelson also informs her that he has met with Dr. King's attorney, Clarence Jones, to discuss the "I Have A Dream" as a "basis of a musical work."

Letter from Tom Cochran to MLK

GEORGIA, Alabama (AL)

Mr. Cochran highlights the need for more responsible leadership within the Civil Rights Movement and also more involvement from middle-class Americans.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry Cohen

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, drafts this correspondence to Rabbi Henry Cohen in regards to a book he is publishing. Miss McDonald informs Rabbi Cohen that Dr. King grants permission to use excerpts from "Letter From Birmingham Jail." She also mentions the enclosure of Dr. King's reply and Dr. King wanting a copy of the book when published.

Stop the War Bring the Troops Home

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, GERMANY, JAPAN, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, AUSTRALIA

This brochure advertises a program to rally the support for eradicating the United States influence in Vietnam. It is distributed by The October Mobilisation, an Australian initiative responding to a call for international protest of the Vietnam War.

What Are We Fighting For?

This outlines the sermon "What Are We Fighting For" into three components: the past, the present, and the future.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

Friday, March 1, 1963
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, Atlanta, GA

SCLC highlights its affiliate activities, fundraisers and efforts to rebuild burned churches in this newsletter from March of 1963. One of the cover stories focuses on the repeal of segregation laws in Albany, Georgia. The "Profile of the Month" article features Milton A. Reid and discusses his contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Rev. Andrew T. Denholm to MLK

Wednesday, March 17, 1965
CANADA, Atlanta, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Rev. Andrew Denholm of St. Paul's United Church in Paris, Ontario send Dr. King a financial contribution and inquires about the need of northern whites for the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. He also inquires about the possibility of a civil rights worker addressing a group of people in his town.

Letter from Angela Reyes to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Angela Reyes offers her condolences to Mrs. King after the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967
Atlantic City, NJ, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C.

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, Memphis, TN, WESTERN SAHARA, Tennessee (TN), South Africa

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Commentary on MLK Article

Indiana (IN), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article describes Dr. King's approval of a recent civil rights ordinance passing in Gary, Indiana. The purpose of the ordinance is to prohibit discrimination in the sale, rental, leasing or financing of real estate. Dr. King thanks the community and members of the City Council for making the ordinance possible.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, January 13, 1964
New York (NY)

Joan Daves writes Dr. King regarding an incomplete document that he signed for the "English tax people." For his convenience, she encloses a pre-written letter to send to England once the document is officially completed.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses royalties for Dr. King's "Why We Can?t Wait," and "Strength to Love."

Letter from Richard L. Zanglin to MLK

Wednesday, August 9, 1967
Cincinnati, OH, Atlanta, GA

Richard L. Zanglin invites Dr. King to speak to the student body at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio.