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God

Dr. King quotes Dr. William Temple, stating that "God minus the world equals God; the world minus God equals nothing."

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

God (His Existence: Psalms)

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's existence.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Letter from Rev. J. Edward Lantz to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Rev. Lantz, Executive Director of the Southern Office of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. William H. Gray, Jr.

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Dora McDonald responds, on behalf of Dr. King, to Dr. William H. Gray, Jr. letter of April 20, 1966 regarding an invitation to speak at the Baptist Ministers Conference.

The Voice: A Bulletin of Crozer Theological Seminary

Dr. King received a copy of this publication from Crozer, which provided alumni updates, religious articles, financial supporters, and current and upcoming seminary events.
Dr. King graduated with honors from Crozer in 1951 as class valedictorian.

News from the SCEF

Monday, February 19, 1962

The Southern Conference Educational Fund writes a statement regarding "two young leaders of integration" who visited a fellow leader in jail and also got arrested. Charles McDew, a Negro and Chairman of the SNCC, and Robert Zellner, a white man and staff member of the SNCC, were charged with criminal anarchy just for bringing books and fruit to a friend who was arrested for participating in demonstrations.

Letter from Dr. David Tillson to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Dr. David Tillson writes Dr. King congratulating him on his stand for peace in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller

Friday, September 14, 1962

In this letter, Dr. King writes to New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller to express his gratitude for the Governor's letter and copy of his new book. Dr. King also refers to the possibility of Gov. Rockefeller's making "a large contribution to the Gandhi Society for Human Rights," and writes extensively about the Society and the effect such a contribution would have.

Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's definition of the philosophy of religion. Brightman argues that the rational interpretation and comparison of religion is the basis for the philosophy of religion.

Lawler Daniels Thanks MLK

Monday, July 10, 1967

Lawler P. Daniels, Jr., President of Sleinad Enterprises, Inc., expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's invitation to the SCLC 10th Annual Convention.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

Dancer, singer, and actress Josephine Baker writes Dr. King to share her views on the current political climate of the United States of America. Her belief is that the best chance of retaining and continuing the progress made by John F. Kennedy is to re-elect Lyndon B. Johnson for President and Robert Kennedy as a New York Senator.

Memo from Harry Boyte to MLK

Mr. Boyte asks Dr. King to review the document "ACTION FOR DEMOCRACY." He also attaches two tables for his review.

Letter from Rev. Hedley W. Plunkett to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967

Reverend Hedley W. Plunkett of Belfast, Northern Ireland, invites Dr. King to include the city on his schedule the next time he comes to Europe. Plunkett describes his interest in King's work and Ireland's own "Color Bar."

Letter from Victor Sharrow to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

Victor Sharrow requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss implementing state and federal plans purportedly suggested by President Johnson. Mr. Sparrow believes that decreasing the number of racist southern representatives will have a collateral affect on southern apportionment of presidential electors.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Tuesday, May 24, 1966

Nickolas W. Dick writes Dr. King on behalf of Dr. Frank H. Epp extending an invitation to the Reverend to hold a series of meetings in Winnipeg. Dick closes by requesting confirmation of the extent of his stay.

Telegram from Charles Pincjard to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

Charles Pincjard writes Dr. King to confirm the date for a the WMPP Awards Brunch.

Letter from John S. Horner to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 7, 1963

John Horner of Grossman Publishers, Inc. writes Dora McDonald regarding the use of an article by Dr. King in a book they are publishing entitled "Instead of Violence." Horner encloses a pamphlet that includes information about the book, their catalogue and their terms of business.

Letter from G. Cacciatore to Mr. Ivan Cameron

In this letter, the Chief of Foreign Operation from the United States Department of State, responds to Ivan C. Cameron recent letter rearding voting in foreign political elections by United States citizens.

Letter from Frank H. Epp to MLK

Monday, November 15, 1965

On behalf of the Canadian Board of Christian Service, Frank H. Epp writes Dr. King inviting him to a series of scheduled discussions in Winnipeg in January of 1966.

MLK Style Sheet: Why We Can't Wait

Here we see what is known as a style sheet for Dr. King's third book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King's book was published in 1964 following the success of the infamous SCLC Birmingham desegregation campaign.

Schrag

Dr. King cites Oswald O. Schrag’s article “The Main Types of Existentialism” that appeared in Religion in Life, winter 1953-54.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elizabeth Babcock

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Babcock that she received the contribution for the SCLC on behalf of Dr. King. Miss McDonald tells Mrs. Babcock that Dr. King is imprisoned in Selma, Alabama and that he will respond upon his release.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

God

Dr. King expresses the power of God as being infinite beyond comprehension of man.

The Cultural Crisis

Dr. King quotes Edward Hallett Carr's "Conditions of Peace."