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Letter from Edward Kuhn, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1961

Edward Kuhn, Jr. provides Dr. King with Bernards Taper's short book on the Tuskegee Gerrymander Case and requests his feedback. Dr. King is informed that his comment will be placed on the "jacket" of the book.

Schleiermacher (Religion as Contemplation)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter to Reverend Ralph Abernathy from Eleanore Wallace

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Mrs. Wallace writes to Rev. Abernathy in admiration of how he has carried on the work of Dr. King and wants to know how she can further contribute to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.

How My Theology Has Changed

Dr. King highlights seven main ways in which his theological views have changed since his final year at Crozer Theological Seminary.

St. Augustine, Florida: 400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

The SCLC compiled and published this pamphlet about St. Augustine, Florida, describing a long history of racial discrimination and segregation supported by Northern tourism.

New York Welfare Organizers to Join Poor People's Campaign

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Susan Oreskes, a welfare organizer in New York City, informs Dr. King that 2000 people demonstrated as part of Dr. Spock’s peace campaign. She and Beulah Sanders, Citywide Coordinator of Welfare Groups, took 4 busses from the Upper West Side to George Wiley’s Poverty Rights Convention in Washington in August where they met with Senator Jacob Javits about a guaranteed minimum income. Mrs. Oreskes also states she wants to work with Dr. King and includes addresses for Beulah Sanders and Arnaldo Barrow of the Puerto Rican Community Project.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Monday, October 17, 1966

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Fiers an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Dallas, Texas for the International Convention.

What Shall We Do to Be Saved

This is an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King, entitled, "What Shall We Do To Be Saved?" It includes an intended introduction. The date and location for which this sermon was delivered is unknown.

Letter from MLK to Gordon R. Pollard

Thursday, January 6, 1966

Dr. King expresses his embarrassment in his late response to Mr. Pollard's letter regarding a speaking engagement at the University of Victoria. Dr. King shares his gratitude for the invitation but regretfully declines due to the fact that he has accepted his maximum number of engagements for the time period.

George A. Chauncey request to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

George A. Chauncey writes Dr. King to request copies of the "Annual Report of the President," a speech that was delivered at the 1967 meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Suffering

Dr. King notes his thoughts on the question of the Biblical prophet Habakkuk: "why do the wicked prosper?"

Schleiermacher

Dr. King records Friedrich Schleiermacher's views on religion, sin and redemption.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Saturday, May 30, 1964

After great success with the first one, John Bolt Culbertson is sponsoring a second mass rally at the Greenville Municipal Auditorium and requests that Dr. King serve as the speaker for this event.

Death

Dr. King meditates on death and a quotation from Thomas Carlyle in which Carlyle compares the death of his mother to the moon sinking into a dark sea.

Program for the SCLC Mass Meeting

Wednesday, October 1, 1958

This program is for a SCLC Mass Meeting that took place, at the Norfok Municipal Auditorium, on October 1, 1958.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Mills to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

This letter from a couple in Austin, Texas is a "message of encouragement" to Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, recently appointed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Reese High School Student to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

Ann Renwick, a senior at Reese High School, informs Dr. King of a term paper she is writing about him and requests information regarding his next visit to Detroit. She also expresses discontent with prejudices against Negros in her small all-white town, but is determined to change the mentality of her peers.

Letter from John Roney to Dr. King

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Mr. Roney explains to Dr. King that the government will create oppressed social hierarchy within society. As a result, he requests that Dr. King responds to his plea or he will be believe that the rumors of government oppression are true.

Aristotle's Psy

Dr. King writes about Aristotle's views on the soul.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Telegram from Dr. K.O. Mbadiwe to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Dr. Nbadiwe requests a meeting with Dr. King regarding a new proposal for the Nigeria-Biafra situation. After two coups earlier that year in Nigeria, Biafra seceded and civil war erupted.

From Reverend M. L. Jackson to MLK

Friday, May 4, 1962

Rev. Jackson expresses his appreciation and support for the work of Dr. King. Rev. Jackson pledges his dedication to the cause and encourages Dr. King to continue his monumental work.

Progress

Dr. King quotes from Browning's "A Death in the Desert."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 15, 1964

This letter, dated October 15, 1964, was written from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald congratulating him on the Nobel Peace Prize. Daves was in negotiation to place his "I Have a Dream" speech on the National Documents Committee.

Letter from Corinne B. Hill and Harold Stassen to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Harold Stassen correspond with Dora McDonald expressing gratitude for a letter sent a few days earlier. The letter involves a book to be written by Dr. King.

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.