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The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

Letter from Toni Harris to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Toni Harris, a student in NYC, wrote this letter to Mrs. King sharing her hope that Dr. King's killer would be caught. This letter is an example of the many levels of support shown towards the King family, from schoolchildren who loved Dr. King.

Draft Proposal for Southern Regional Community Services Council

Tuesday, March 29, 1966

As a draft proposal for the non-profit Southern Regional Community Services Council, this document outlines the purpose and intended methodologies of the organization. The Council's mission is to train local leaders to help the unemployed and poor find jobs. Local leaders would include representation from churches, colleges, farm groups, professionals, and small businesses. Other goals are to increase living standards and cycle income back into businesses that focus on community savings and development.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Letter from Mahalia Jackson Foundation Requesting Financial Support

In this letter addressed to "Friend," gospel singer Mahalia Jackson requests financial support for the Mahalia Jackson Foundation, which helps deserving children obtain a higher education.

Letter from Franklin H. Williams to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Ambassador Williams congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to a United Nations reception.

Letter from MLK to Senator Abraham Ribicoff

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Abraham Ribicoff's efforts in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

Letter from George G. Hill to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

George Hill expresses that he will continue to support the SCLC but feels the need to make two suggestions regarding the Alabama boycott and Vietnam War. He questions the use of economic force in obtaing equal rights and suggests the need to connect with underprivileged around the world.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK

Wednesday, June 30, 1965

Asbury Howard, Vice President of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of the harassment and attacks their union has endured for several years. He explains the 1949 indictment of officers from the union on charges of "falsely signing non-Communist affidavits." The case was dormant until government brought the case to trial in 1959 during a strike of 40,000 allied worker and copper miners. Howard cites this as evidence of union busting. He requests Dr. King's commentary and encloses a pamphlet regarding the case.

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Friday, August 4, 1967

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Letter from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Friday, November 22, 1963

The executive director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. communicates to the recipient that despite the raids by the state and city police, the organization is attempting to continue operations. The police stripped the SCEF of numerous documentation and correspondence information. The director is certain they would be able to obtain success with the moral support in New Orleans and a possible contribution from the recipient. Of significance is the letter's date: the day of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

Banner at "Poor People's March," Washington, D.C. June, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Special Human Rights Year Issue of The Journal of the International Commission of Jurists

Monday, January 1, 1968

This document is informing prospective contributors about the Special Human Rights Year Issue of The Journal of the International Commission of Jurists. Dr. King was listed to contribute to the publication with "Freedom and Equality."

Comment On Proposed Resolution: Ending Racism in the Democratic Party

Friday, October 9, 1964

On October 9th, 1964, the Democratic National Convention adopted a resolution ending racial discrimination in Party membership.

Why We Can't Wait Book Cover

This draft of Why We Can't Wait contains sketches of a cover, table of contents and edits of the brief description.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

Letter from Arthur L. Kinsolving to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Arthur Kingsolving sends his thanks to Dr. King for remembering him and sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Agnosticism

Dr. King quotes Ernst Haeckel's "The Riddle of the Universe."

Ontology

Dr. King poses the ontological question "What is being itself?" and quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Dr. King praises President John F. Kennedy for his eloquent appeal for freedom and justice and says the President's message will become "a hallmark in the annals of American history" if his proposed legislation is passed.

Telegram from Josephine Jones to MLK

Ms. Jones, President of the Metropolitan Community Leaders, writes to Dr. King about Albert Shanker's stance on African American education.

Letter from Griffin R. Simmons to MLK

Thursday, October 4, 1962

Griffin R. Simmons, President of The Consolidate Association, responds to Dr. King's letter of recent date stating that he was chosen to be honored by the Consolidate Association. Simmons hopes that Dr. King can make an appearance at the Fall Affair, and requests him to make a statement which will appear in their journal.

Letter from Dixie to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966

Dixie, a white man and segregationist, states in his letter to Dr. King that it has taken the Whites only a few weeks to get segregation rolling again.

Proposal for a Conference on Democratic Planning in America

This proposal highlights a conference that is focused on creating an understanding of democratic development, economic planning, civil rights and peace movements.

Prayer by Dean L. Harold DeWolf at Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, June 26, 1966

This is a prayer by Dr. King's doctoral advisor, Dean L. Harold DeWold of Wesley Theological Seminary, given at the Civil Rights Rally on the Capitol grounds in Jackson, Mississippi.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. E. A. Larson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Dora McDonald notifies Mrs. E. Larson of Dr. King's absence and informs her that he has never been to Russia, but has no objection to a visit there.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Royalties Earned from "Stride Toward Freedom"

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

This document references royalties earned in the amount $39.00 from the Van Logham Slaterus' publication of "Stride Toward Freedom".