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Invitation to MLK from Randolph Carter

Wednesday, February 3, 1064

Randolph Carter invites Dr. King to be the featured leader in a Conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Letter from Ali Beno Veidt to MLK

Saturday, February 26, 1966

Comparing Black Muslims to Nazis, Veidt speaks against Dr. King's practices in the movement, as well as his involvement with Elijah Muhammad. Veidt's correspondence includes a photograph of the two men together.

February 1968, Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, writes to announce the endorsment of Reverend S. M. Sam Davis at their candidate for bishop.

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, annouces Reverend S. M. Sam Davis as their candidate for bishop. As a member of the Davis Boosters' Club, she attempts to solicit support for Reverend Davis. The Boosters' Club will feature Mrs. Lucinda Brown Pobey and Mrs. Willie Mae bell in a special financial event.

Letter from Rev. Robert Hoggard of Grace Cathedral to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 18, 1965

Reverend Robert Hoggard, of Grace Cathderal in San Francisco, contacts Dora McDonald with the hope that Dr. King will be able to preach for their congregation on March 28, 1965.

Letter from James H. MacDonald to MLK

Friday, June 16, 1967

James MacDonald asks Dr. King to send a statement regarding his personal struggles to assist with the sermon MacDonald will deliver to his congregation. MacDonald also seeks advice on how to integrate his church.

Letter from Senora Springfied to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Mrs. Senora Springfied requests that Dr. King send Leon Hall, an SCLC employee, back to Grenada, Mississippi. She praises Hall and mentions that the town needs leaders like him.

Letter from Rev. Michael Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Rev. Michael Hamilton informs Dr. King that the book "The Viet Nam War - Christian Perspectives", which includes Dr. King's address on Vietnam, has just been published. Hamilton also notifies Dr. King of publicity plans and expresses gratitude for his contribution.

Letter from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Friday, November 22, 1963

The executive director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. communicates to the recipient that despite the raids by the state and city police, the organization is attempting to continue operations. The police stripped the SCEF of numerous documentation and correspondence information. The director is certain they would be able to obtain success with the moral support in New Orleans and a possible contribution from the recipient. Of significance is the letter's date: the day of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

Statement Adapted from MLK Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Tom Offenbburger requests Dr. King's permission to forward this adaptation of his Nobel Prize acceptance speech for publication in the French newspaper, "Ouest France."

Telegram from Governor Edmund Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Governor Brown writes to Dr. King protesting the brutal treatment of Negro citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Mrs. Catherine Hartman to MLK about a New Publication

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

In this letter Mrs. Catherine Hartman of Atheneum Publishers sends Dr. King a new publication, asking that Dr. King read it and offer any comments.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

This is a draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Handwritten notes are written in the margins to indicate future amendments. Dr. King states that he experiences this moment of acceptance for himself and "those magnificent devotees of nonviolence who have moved so courageously against the ramparts of racial injustice."

Worship

Dr. King references William Ernest Hocking and James Bissett Pratt regarding religious worship.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Hamman

Friday, July 21, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mr. Hamman for his previous letter in support of Dr. King and his work .

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Alversia Dunkley to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mrs. Dunkley writes Dr. King hoping to receive permission to publish her song, "Man of God," about Dr. King. She also requests contact information for the family of "Miss Viola" to receive permission to publish a poem entitled "Viola."

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

Restorationism

Dr. King defines restorationism.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

An individual finds it insulting that Dr. King is compared to Abraham Lincoln and would like Dr. King to be remembered as a traitor.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Edward A. Jones

Tuesday, April 9, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Edward Jones of Morehouse College, asking him to translate the enclosed letter for Dr. King.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Francis Smiley

Mr. Francis Smiley expresses his admiration to Dr. King for his leadership in what he describes as a potential end of civilization with the continued course of the Vietnam war. Francis encloses a check as an expression of heartfelt gratitude to the Reverend for his insight, humaneness, courage, and truthfulness.

MLK Report: Annual Address, MIA

Thursday, December 3, 1959

In his final address to the Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King gives a status report on the various initiatives of the organization. He also gives a final farewell in hopes that the MIA is challenged to continue to fight in the struggle for equality.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Mr. Jones, on behalf of the Council for Co-operative Action, invites Dr. King to speak at their function in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Goucher College

Friday, June 26, 1964

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's delight in knowing that Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Coucher College will include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on their school's reading list. She urges Dean Dorsey to purchase Dr. King's recent book "Why We Can't Wait," which contains the full text of the letter.

Constitution and Bylaws of the SCLC

This booklet contains the constitution and bylaws of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Irene Dunaway Requests Sermon from SCLC

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Irene V. Dunaway of Daly City, California writes the members of SCLC requesting a copy of Dr. King's recent address on the ABC network. She admires the sermon as "one of the greats," and would also like to "brush up" on her knowledge of history pertaining to Vietnam.

Telegram from Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965

Mr. Spock invites Dr. King to send a representative to a discussion on the upcoming Washington Vietnam Mobilization.

Telegram from MLK to Governor Albertis Harrison

Dr. King requests an investigation into acts of police brutality committed in Petersburg, Virginia during a demonstration.