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"Norfolk, VA"

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967
New York, NY

Co-Chairman Julian Bond welcomes Dr. King and other members of the SCLC to the National Conference for New Politics. Bond also comments on past civil rights victories, and he mentions future organizational directions.

Check from New York Times Company to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA)

The New York Times company presents Dr. King with a $400 check for his article on civil rights.

Is Dialogue Alien to Marxism?" (Polemics)

New York (NY)

Czech philosopher Julius Tomin discusses the role of dialogue within Marxist discourse. Critiquing the position set forth by Milan Machovec in his text "Sense of Life," Tomin outlines the the definition of dialogue, the climate necessary for a dialogue to occur, and the role of dialogue in the humanization of men.

Statement on the Indictment of MLK

Thursday, March 3, 1960
Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Orangeburg, SC, Birmingham, AL, Nashville, TN, Tallahassee, FL, Little Rock, AR

The "Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr." issued this statement, accusing the state of Alabama of falsely distorting Dr. King's 1958 income tax return in an attempt to indict him.

Introduction of MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

These notes are from an introduction written about Dr. King and presumably delivered before he gave an address. Dr. King, who remains unnamed, is presented as a man whose record precedes him given that his life and work has had so profound an impact upon his time.

His Attitude Toward Higher Criticism

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Immanuel Kant's book "The Preface to the First Edition.

Critical Postcard to MLK

Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

The author of this document questions whether Dr. King is worthy of the Nobel Peace Prize Honor.

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

Letter from MLK to Helga Gulbrandsen

Thursday, March 12, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

Dr. King responds to an invitation to visit Oslo, Norway under the auspices of the Norwegian Fellowship in the fall of 1964. He informs Ms. Gulbrandsen that he cannot commit to accepting the invitation due to his uncertain schedule, but assures her that he will keep her invitation on file. However, Dr. King's handwritten notes found on the letter indicate that he was unable to accept the invitation.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Sunday, April 9, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter addressed to Rev. Martin "Coon" King, the writer--who does not identify himself-- maintains Dr. King is "damag[ing]...the negroes [sic] cause" by focusing on giving them "handouts," as opposed to "improv[ing] their morals."

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. Gosta Dahl

Thursday, June 11, 1964
GERMANY, NORWAY, Stockholm, Sweden

In this letter, dated June 11, 1964 to Mr. Gosta Dahl, Joan Daves expresses the importance of "Why We Can't Wait" and why they feel it is a "...potentially more successful" work than Dr. King's other two books. Accordingly, they request minimum advance and royalty schedules. She asks that Mr. Dahl check with the Swedish publishers to see if they would raise their offer, for the use of Dr. King's work.

Letter from Nancy and Bill Brodie to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Nancy and Bill Brodie write Mrs. King to express their sympathy regarding Dr. King's assassination. As a method to comfort Mrs. King, Nancy includes a poem that she wrote for her father when he died.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

Atlanta, GA, CHINA, VIETNAM

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Letter from MLK to Lillian M. Robertson

Wednesday, July 31, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlantic City, NJ

Dr. King writes Lillian Robertson acknowledging receipt of her letter inviting him to speak at the annual meeting of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship in Atlantic City. The Reverend closes by stating it will be after the first of the year before he can make a definite commitment.

Meeting on National Negro Politics

Sunday, March 31, 1968
New York, NY, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Missouri (MO), Brooklyn, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA)

The Meeting on National Negro Politics highlights congressional races with "the most potential for political gains by black Americans" in the 1968 elections.

Letter from Leroy R. Weiner

Monday, July 18, 1966
New York, NY, Pennsylvania (PA)

Leroy R. Weiner writes Mr. Harry Belafonte addressing a recent appeal made on behalf of the organization SNCC.

Letter from Charles Johnson to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Charles Johnson offers suggestions to Dr. King about job creation following the violent riots that took place in the summer of 1967. He proposes that the federal government intervene and allow younger potential workers to enter into the job force and retire those who have been employed a long time. According to Johnson, employing these young workers will eliminate the uprisings seen in various urban cities around the United States.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, EGYPT, GREECE, Johannesburg, South Africa, KENYA, GHANA, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS, Birmingham, AL, CHINA, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, Albany, GA, Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA, Los Angeles, CA, South Africa

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Telegram from Berry Gordy, Jr. to MLK

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

President of Motown Record Corporation, Berry Gordy, Jr., awaits Dr. King's decision on the album, "The Great March on Washington."

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Makola

VIETNAM, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King thanks Mr. Makola for reminding him of the "injustices and inequalities" Negroes face both in the United States and South Africa. Dr. King asserts that the issues Negroes face are symptoms of a deeper issue involving foreign policy and that his current focus is on the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Saturday, June 1, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, informs Dr. King that President Kennedy is unable to meet on the suggested days due to his travels.

Importance of the Public Accommodations Section of the Civil Rights Bill

Atlanta, GA

This document features a story of a white civil rights worker who was fined and sentence to jail because she sought to eat with her Negro friends in a restaurant in Atlanta.

God

Dr. King notes that Jeremiah 9:23 speaks of man's ability to know and understand God in contrast to modern theology's claim that God is beyond knowing.

Letter from MLK to Dr. L. K. Jackson

Tuesday, February 5, 1963
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King regretfully informs Dr. L. K. Jackson that the Sunday he wants to preach at Ebenezer is one of the three Sundays that he is obliged to preach. Dr. King states the he knows Pastor Jackson understands his schedule and he would love to have him speak at his church in the future. Dr. King connects Pastor Jackson to Reverend Abernathy so that he can preach at his church.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Letter from Adam C. Powell to Wyatt Tee Walker

New York (NY)

Reverend Adam Clayton Powell copies to MLK a letter informing Wyatt Walker that his preaching duties at Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem are being terminated because of budget constraints.

Telegram from Coretta Scott King to the Family of Dr. Thomas Merton

Tuesday, December 17, 1968
Louisville, KY

Mrs. Coretta Scott King writes to the family of Dr. Thomas Merton expressing her condolences regarding his death. She explains that the tribute Dr. Merton paid to her late husband will never be forgotten and urges the family to remember that the spiritual bonds that exist between a family is eternal.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to William H. Oliver

Saturday, May 8, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Ralph Abernathy informs Mr. Oliver that emergencies will prevent him from meeting the week of May 14th, and asks to reschedule for a later date.