The Archive

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"North Carolina (NC)"

Letter from Taconic Foundation to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963

Stephen Currier, President of the Taconic Foundation, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting about the development of a new program. Currier lists other individuals who have been invited to serve as consultants and who will provide "an evaluation of Negro gains up to the present."

Letter from American Friends Service Committee to MLK

Monday, March 14, 1966

R. Ogden Hannaford and Kale A. Williams, representatives of the American Friends Service Committee, enclose a pre-publication edition of a book aimed at peacefully resolving the issues in Vietnam.

Letter to MLK from Ida Kinney

Ida Kinney sends Dr. King a letter expressing her support for his work. She informs him that she would like to begin making monthly financial donations toward the movement.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Sunday, January 22, 1956

This is a church program for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in early 1956. As Pastor, Dr. King gave a sermon on "Redirecting Our Missionary Zeal."

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

Telegram from MLK to Robert M. Drevs

Dr. King applauds Robert M. Drevs and the Catholic Interracial Council for selecting Bill Berry to receive the John F. Kennedy award.

Letter from MLK to Adolf Kriess

Friday, December 7, 1962

Dr. King sends a note of thanks to Mr. Kriess for a poem he sent.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

Wednesday, July 15, 1964

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

Letter from Edward Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1963

Edward Crawford of New York encloses a quotation for Dr. King to keep in his possession. The quotation centers around individuals who continue to be slient about serious issues that matter.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Letter from Leroy Johnson to MLK

State Senator Leroy R. Johnson forwards a Senate Pass to Dr. King, and informs him of an open invitation to visit the Senate at his leisure.

Letter from MLK to Richard Nixon

Wednesday, May 15, 1957

Dr. King follows up a conversation he had with the Vice President Richard Nixon while in Ghana. He expresses interest in meeting with him to discuss problems in the South.

Letter from Senator Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Senator Robert Kennedy thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence and expresses his aligned views regarding nonviolent reconciliation. Senator Kennedy believes in the preservation of dignity and freedom internationally without imposing "incessant military conflict" upon those with unaligned views. He references Dr. King's statement regarding the precedence of progress in America to that of other countries. He also wishes to hear Dr. King's reaction to a series of his speeches on "A Program for the Urban Crisis" that he has attached.


Dr. King writes about the smallness of the earth in the great expanse of the universe.

Letter to MLK from Vice President Hubert Humphrey

Thursday, June 15, 1967

In this letter, U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his support and applauds him for all his hard work, while commenting on fair and decent housing.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Edna R. McKinnon

Wednesday, December 20, 1967

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Edna McKinnon expressing deep appreciation for her generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He continues to say that the work of the organization is strengthened by such support.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King references McTaggart's perception of religion as being an emotional resting between ourselves and the universe.

MLK's Speech Notes

In these speech notes, Dr. King references the plight of the Jewish community in the Soviet Union and the silent betrayal of onlookers. John Donne is quoted in his famous excerpt, "No man is an island entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main."

Crusade for Citizenship

Friday, October 21, 1966

This check was issued to Chauncey Williams for his assistance with the Crusade For Citizenship's voter registration campaign.

Pilgrimage to Nonviolence

Dr. King's essay "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" provides a replete account of the thinkers, ideas and sentiments responsible for his pledge to nonviolence.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Advertisement for Ku Klux Klan Segregation Meeting

This advertisement invites every white person who supports segregation to attend an upcoming meeting sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan.

"Race Hate and Divisiveness"

This newspaper clipping depicts Dr. King's decision to move the civil rights movement up north as "one of grave peril to everyone concerned." The author believes that the defiance of the law could cause disaster for the Negro cause.


Here, Dr. King defines freedom.

Letter from Daniel Glantz to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

This letter is from Daniel Glantz of Sweden. Glantz wrote the letter because he was ordered to do so by beings from outer space. According to Glantz the space beings look like angels and the angels would like to meet with Dr. King, whose mission they morally support. Glantz ends his letter by asking Dr. King if he recognizes the cosmic symbol, which is in the upper left-hand corner of the document and appears as a red circle with a white cross topped by a green triangle or pyramid.

Letter from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Thursday, November 29, 1962

Melvin Arnold addressed this letter to Dr. King, inquiring about the publishing of his second book, "Stregnth to Love."This letter contains a request for Dr. King to negotiate a contract and deal with issues of royalties. Also included is Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.