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"North Carolina (NC)"

News Release from SCLC about MLK's telegram concerning Violations of the Fair Labor Standards Acts

Thursday, March 15, 1962

This SCLC press release highlights Dr. King's request for the U.S. Department of Labor to investigate labor violations and discrimination at shrimp factories in Georgia. Dr.King asserts that African-American workers have been harrassed and underpaid.

God

Dr. King quotes Donald M. Baillie's "God Was in Christ."

Letter from Clarence D. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Director of the Southern Region of the National Urban League, Clarence D. Coleman, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the 1964 Nobel Piece Prize. Coleman extends his very best wishes to Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of the staff of the Southern Regional Office of the National Urban League and the officers and members of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference.

Dr. King's Speech in Front of U.N. April 15, 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter from Mrs. Daily to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mrs. Daily seeks to be compensated for the dollar bill she lost in the Lucky Buck Contest and requests Dr. King's assistance in this effort.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alfred A. Haesler Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Thursday, October 5, 1967

In this correspondence to Alfred A. Haesler, Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, acknowledged the receipt of Mr. Haesler letter, inviting Dr. King to complete a writing assignment. However, due to prior engagements, Dr. King would not be able to complete any other publications, but offered that his book entitled, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?" answered most of the questions raised in the letter.

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964

This statement was released by Dr. King ten years after the Supreme Court's decision, Brown versus Board of Education, which made segregation in public schools unconstitutional. The Reverend states, "The naive might believe great strides have been made in school desegregation over the past decade, but this is not at all true."

Crusade For The Ballot

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a pamphlet addressing the need for increased registration of Negro voters in the southern states of America.

Letter from Jacob Javits to MLK

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

Senator Jacob Javits expresses his gratitude for an inscribed book that Dr. King sent him.

SCLC Meeting Agenda

Wednesday, June 6, 1962

This agenda for the Southern Leadership Conference meeting held on June 12, 1967, outlines the various speakers and their respective topics to be discussed.

Letter to Mrs. King from Lillian Tynec

Saturday, October 10, 1959

Lillian Tynec writes Mrs. King to request the travel details related to a Women's Day program.

Letter from Edmund Gordon to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Edmund W. Gordon expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's agreement to use his name in connection with the development of a Memorial Park honoring W.E.B Dubois. Mr. Gordon also informs Dr. King of the other participants of the project along with a brief description of his professional background.

Request for a Speaker Choice '68

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Lonnie Longmire, representative of Baylor Universtiy, request that Dr. King suggest speakers that support his presidential candidacy for the Choice '68 project.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King cross-references fundamentalism with authoritarianism.

Letter from Rev. Hedley W. Plunkett to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967

Reverend Hedley W. Plunkett of Belfast, Northern Ireland, invites Dr. King to include the city on his schedule the next time he comes to Europe. Plunkett describes his interest in King's work and Ireland's own "Color Bar."

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and expresses her love for him.

Letter to MLK from Raymond Brown

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Raymond Brown writes to Dr. King admonishing him for his affiliations with Adam Clayton Powell and Stokely Carmichael and hopes that these associations are temporary.

The Gospel and How We Love Our Enemies

John C. Heidbrink sets forth the notion that in order to be a disciple of Christ, in any age, one must express unconditional love "toward him who seeks to destroy us," irrespective of differences in personal, national, or religious sentiments.

Letter from Nancy F. Oakes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Nancy Oakes writes a letter of support to Reverend Ralph Abernathy and wishes him success with the March for the Poor People's Crusade.

Letter from US Attorney Charles L. Goodson to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963

U.S. Attorney Charles L. Goodson informs Dr. King that the Justice Department for the Northern District of Georgia intends to work closely with King by offering facilities and assistance.

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

Friday, August 31, 1962

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

No More Negro Cop Restrictions Asked

These newspaper clippings feature a photo and caption of Atlanta Police Chief Herbert Jenkins regarding the lifting of restrictions on Negro policemen arresting white persons, and an article on alleged violent tactics by a labor union.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Monday, April 12, 1965

In this letter to Miss McDonald, Ms. Daves discusses a request for Dr. King to write a short introduction to William Bradford Huie's work "Three Lives for Mississippi". Ms. Daves stresses the importance of this opportunity as it addresses a topic "very much on Dr. King's mind," namely the starting of a "dialogue...between the two opposing forces."

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

MLK Sermon: Non-Conformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King delivers this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia. He references the statement Representative Julian Bond made regarding the Vietnam War and discusses the responsibility of Christians to be morally noble instead of socially respectable. He references multiple biblical figures and explains the importance of not conforming to society.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."