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"North Carolina (NC)"

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Letter from MLK to Helen Anderson

Friday, February 9, 1968

This letter is in acknowledgement and appreciation of contributions to the SCLC from Mrs. Helen Anderson to Dr. King which was overlooked in the mail.

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

Letter to MLK from New York University Professor Philip Zimbardo

Thursday, April 27, 1967

New York University Psychology Professor Philip Zimbardo sends his support to Dr. King.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

The Director of the National Catholic Conference on Interracial Justice offers the support of his organization during Dr. King's imprisonment in Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. William H. Gray, Jr.

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Dora McDonald responds, on behalf of Dr. King, to Dr. William H. Gray, Jr. letter of April 20, 1966 regarding an invitation to speak at the Baptist Ministers Conference.

"King's New Book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 23, 1967

This Argus newspaper clipping is a mini review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter to Mr. Wilkinson from Dr. Schrade

Monday, May 3, 1965

Dr. Schrade asks Mr. Wilkinson in the NAACP office in New York to pass on a request for Dr. King to write an article for his magazine. Previous Nobel Prize winners have submitted an autograph photo and a short biography to the magazine. In additional to the requested article, Dr. Schrade hopes Dr. King will do the same.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

Letter from William T. McKnight to Time Magazine

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

William McKnight communicates with officials at "Time" magazine, thanking them for honoring Dr. King as their "Man of the Year." He feels that their decision to honor Dr. King also gives attention to the plight of the Negro in 1963.

Statement by MLK re Citizen Diplomacy

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King releases a statement that he was considering communicating by mail with the "major powers" involved in the Vietnam conflict. However; he now believes that with the changing factors of certain groups involved in the conflict, his proposed communication is no longer needed.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, February 11, 1963

Benjamin E. Mays invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Founder's Day Banquet at Morehouse College.

Letter from Clifford Park to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

The President of the United Church of Canada, London Conference, writes Dr. King attempting to receive a notification of his availability to be the devotional speaker at their annual conference.

Next Steps In The South

Sunday, July 1, 1956

The Southern Regional Council publishes a pamphlet that addresses the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Case and what its implications mean for society. The pamphlet goes on to answer several questions concerning school integration and gives background information on the case and the issues of segregation.

Letter from Robert McDougal, Jr. to MLK Regarding a Donation Appeal

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

In this letter, McDougal acknowledges Dr. King's appeal of October 1965, however states that he is concentrating his donations on other organizations. On the letter there are handwritten comments regarding Dr. King's response.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

This postcard refers to 5 men arrested for exhibiting "black power."

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, June 2, 1967

Ms. Badeker informs Dora McDonald that three copies of a contract with Econ Verlag are enclosed. She instructs that Dr. King is to sign and return the copies in order to further the German-language rights to "Where Do We Go from Here?"

News Article about MLK's Church and Atlanta Housing Project

In this article, the author highlights Dr. King's involvement with a recent urban housing redevelopment project. The author states that the Ebenezer Baptist Church will commit full sponsorship; he later discusses the various plans in more detail and the purpose to community it will serve.

Freedom Rally

Thursday, April 16, 1964

This document is the program for the Freedom Rally held at Vermont Avenue Baptist in support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Tuesday, December 11, 1962

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on science and religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

An Evening of Music

Sunday, April 15, 1962

The English family provides Ebenezer Baptist Church with "An Evening of Music" in the spring of 1962.

Telegram from C. C. Shell to MLK

C. C. Shells writes Dr. King suggesting that segregationist Lester Maddox run for President of the United State with Dr. King as Vice President.

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

Letter from Dwight Campbell to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964

The Methodist Youth Fellowship extends a second invitation to Dr. King to speak to in Philadelphia. The proposed speaking engagement would coincide with Dr. King's appearance at the Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee meeting.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

Letter from Israel Goldstein to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Israel Goldstein congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to the King family to visit his home in Jerusalem.

Letter from Francis M. Evans to MLK

Thursday, August 13, 1964

Francis Evans wishes to acquire an autographed portrait of Dr. King for his employee, Captain Arthur Graves. Captain Graves is in preparation for a transfer and Evans wants to honor Graves with a special memento.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Julius Rosenthal

Friday, December 10, 1965

Dr. King writes to his supporter Rabbi Julius Rosenthal responding to concerns raised about Dr. King's connections with Congressman Adam Clayton Powell (a prominent pastor and politician). Congressman Powell was a controversial figure during that time and while Dr. King did not share all of his views, he gave him credit for advocating Civil Rights for African Americans.