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Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

etter from Mrs. Howard Wood to MLK

Mrs. Howard Wood conveys her support to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement after reading the novel "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora MacDonald Regarding MLK's Schedule

Monday, December 12, 1966

Here Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's secretary, Ms. Dora MacDonald, requesting to know when and where Dr. King can be reached while in New York. Joan Daves also informs Miss MacDonald of the availability of Hermine Popper and requests the notes from earlier publishing meetings.

Letter from Louis Toney to MLK

Saturday, May 29, 1965

Army veteran Louis Toney attempts to solicit a job with the SCLC, citing military experience, a college degree and ordination as characteristics that qualify him for the job.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.

Letter to MLK from Guy Dauncey

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Guy Dauncey, Chairman of the Human Rights Committee at Nottingham University, offered this request for Dr. King to visit England, in March of 1968. The content, within the letter, placed emphasis on special events surrounding "Human Rights Year 1968", to begin a progressive Civil and Human Rights movement in England.

Letter from MLK to Jonathan B. Bingham

Monday, February 28, 1966

Dr. King responds to Congressman Bingham's request for information concerning SCLC's position on foreign policy matters and donor contributions. Dr. King informs the congressman that the organization decided at a recent convention to "have SCLC abstain from foreign policy matters," in order to preserve its civil rights objectives and donor's trust. However, Dr. King states that SCLC permits individual employees to assume whatever position they choose regarding foreign policy matters, and contributes his public statements concerning Vietnam to this privilege.

Telegram from W. L. Bentley to MLK

W. L. Bentley expresses to Dr. King that his ill health prevents him from being present. He also requests to enroll and would like to be forwarded the cost.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Babcock for her substantial contribution and lets her know that her continued generosity and abiding faith in the cause have served to sustain and renew the strength of the SCLC.

Dr. King's Written Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Ibarance Mann's views on death. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for refernce to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions and bible verses.

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.

Letter from Christa Beer to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965

Christa Beer, a student at the English Institute of Frederick-Schiller University of Jena in East Germany, informs Dr. King that she is writing her final paper on his works in civil rights. She explains the lack of resources at her university and asks that he send her information to aid her in her research.

List of SCLC Program Areas

This list briefly outlines the SCLC Program Areas including Voter Registration and Political Education, Citizenship Education, Operation Breadbasket, and Direct Action.

Telegram from MLK to Mattie Tillman

Dr. King expresses his condolences to Mattie Tillman for the death of her husband. Dr. King states that he will always be remembered for his influence in the Atlanta University community.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967

Maurice A. Dawkins is requesting Dr. King to attend an infomal meeting, along with other civil rights leaders, to discuss the War on Proverty in the South.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

People In Action: The Role of the Church

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation and the role of the church in rectifying the situation.

Letter from Eric Weinburger to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

Mr. Eric Weinburger requests the assistance of Dr. King in publicizing the Committee for Nonviolent Action's tax refusal campaign.

Religion

Dr. King writes that religion is paradoxical.

Quasi Positivism

Dr. King outlines philosopher Alfred North Whitehead's views on the relationship between metaphysics and the philosophy of science. Referencing Whitehead's work "The Concept of Nature," this note card contains a quote from the original text and also paraphrases Whitehead's writings.

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.

Letter from William Ryan to MLK

Monday, March 1, 1965

William Ryan, member of Congress writes Dr. King after he and other members of Congress were able to visit Selma. After witnessing the conditions at hand, they have been urged to break the barrier on the right to vote.

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Wedding Ceremony Invitation

Sunday, August 16, 1959

This document is an invitation to the wedding ceremony of Bertha Sue Alford and Mr. Charles A. Pinkston.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James P. Dixon of Antioch College

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Dr. James Dixon to express Dr. King's joy in his ability to accept Dr. Dixon's invitation to speak at Antioch College's commencement.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Charles W. Englehard

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Harry Wachtel writes Charles Englehard thanking him for his payment of $5,000 toward a $15,000 pledge to The American Foundation On Nonviolence. He states that his initial contribution was extremely helpful in registering African Americans in Mississippi and other southern states.

SCLC Duties

This document outlines general responsibilities and specific duties of SCLC officers. Top level members listed include Dr. King, President, Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to President, Andrew Young, Program Director, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, Office Manager and Educational Consultant, and Ralph Abernathy, Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The document states that Dr. King's general responsibility as President is to "coordinate and interpret the total program of SCLC."

Letter From Don Slaiman

Don Slaiman of the AFL-CIO encloses a brochure titled "The Right to Strike and General Welfare." This brochure, which was developed by the Committee on the Church and Economic Life of the National Council of Churches, address problems and proposes solution to the Labor Movement.