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Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Letter from Ivor Liss to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963

Ivor M. Liss writes Dr. King and explains his support for the movement that Dr. King is leading. He talks about how being silent would actually hurt Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. Liss explains that as a Jew he understands the fight for equality as it is something that Jewish people are still fighting for. He encloses a check for $100.00.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable Joseph S. Clark

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator Joseph S. Clark of Pennsylvania to commend his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Request to Use "I Have a Dream" Speech in a Musical Composition

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Classical composer Irwin Heilner requests Dr. King's permission to sample the "I Have a Dream" speech in a musical work. Heilner specifies his plans to send the song to musicians in order to get it published, and outlines the terms of the royalties if it is successful. The notes at the bottom of the letter indicate that Dr. King referred Heilner to attorney Clarence Jones regarding use of the speech.

Call to Action in Race Relations

Sunday, January 1, 1961

J. Oscar Lee and S. Garry Oniki draft a memorandum to outline the purpose, function and program emphases for the General Committee for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations sponsored by the National Council of Churches.

Letter from MLK to Jo Ellen Braveman

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dr. King thanks Jo Ellen Braveman, an employee at the Julia Richman High School, and the Human Relations Club for presenting him with an award.

Totalitarianism

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

Letter from New York City Mayor to MLK

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The Mayor of New York, John V. Lindsay, invites Dr. King to a conference entitled "Puerto Ricans Confront the Problems of the Complex Urban Society: A Design for Change." Panel meetings will expound on twelve subjects ranging from "Education" to the "Administration of Justice."

Letter From Roberta S. Felton to Miss Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 1, 1962

Roberta S. Felton writes to Dora McDonald in recognition and thanks for the letter she received.

Prayer by Dean L. Harold DeWolf at Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, June 26, 1966

This is a prayer by Dr. King's doctoral advisor, Dean L. Harold DeWold of Wesley Theological Seminary, given at the Civil Rights Rally on the Capitol grounds in Jackson, Mississippi.

Letter from William M. Grayson to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1962

William M. Grayson, the President of the local NAACP chapter in West Virginia, requests the help of Dr. King to assist the organization in gaining more members. Grayson asks that Dr. King provide a schedule and availability for when he could possibly provide aid.

Letter and Article from D. Parke Gibson to MLK

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

D. Parke Gibson sends this article in Race Relations and Industry to Dr. King with the intention of including him in a future issue of the magazine. Those involved in the article agree that progress towards having minorities in leadership roles is on the rise, but not fast enough.

Letter from Andrew Young to Edward Lamb

Friday, September 8, 1967

Andrew Young writes to Edward Lamb, acknowledging his efforts in donating and raising money for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dr. King's secretary forwards him information for an event in Copenhagen in which his presence is requested. Dr. King's brief response is indicated on the top of the memo.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

Letter from MLK to Minnie N. Thompson

Monday, April 9, 1962

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Minnie N. Thompson for her encouragement. He states he will make an effort to meet her son when he visits the Morehouse College Campus.

Letter from Mike Epstein to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Mr. Epstein thanks Dr. King for his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement and his stance on the war in Vietnam. Epstein considers Dr. King's status as "a man of judgment" an asset.

Letter from Carl Haessler to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967

Mr. Haessler informs Dr. King of the closing of the Michigan newspaper, "The Federated Press." Mr. Haessler writes that the remaining funds from the Press will be distributed among certain organizations, including the SCLC.

MLK Note Card - "Immortality"

On this handwritten notecard, entitled, simply, "Immortality," Dr. King quotes Tennyson on the subject.

Letter from Jose Luis Villar Palasi to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Jose Luis Villar Palasi informs Dr. King tha that the Chair for Cultural Sociology has invited him to present at the Universidad of Madrid.

Correspondence: Telgegram from W.A. Flowers to Dr.King

Friday, September 9, 1966

This telegram from W.A. Flowers is offering words of support and encouragement to Dr. King and the movement. Flower discourages the behavior leaders, such as Stokley Carmichael and hopes Dr. King stands firm to his conviction to better all man kind.

Letter from Donald Godbey to MLK Regarding Cooperation

Thursday, June 15, 1967

In this letter, Donald Godbey offers Dr. King various suggestions on how men and women of all backgrounds can join together in unity.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 27, 1964

Joan Daves sends three checks to Dr. King. The first check is an advance due from Harper and Row, the second represents an advance from NAL and the third is a partial payment from "Life."

Highlander Folk School 25th Anniversary Seminar

The Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tennessee, hosts the 25th Anniversary Seminar entitled "The South Thinking Ahead." At the program, Dr. King is scheduled to deliver the keynote address and activities have been set up to entertain the children that may be in attendance.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Press Release: MLK Joins Sponsors of April 15 Marches on San Francisco and New York City

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this press release, Dr. King announces his support of a massive mobilization against the Vietnam War. Sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, major peace marches are being held in New York City and San Francisco. Mrs. King is also listed as a leader who endorsed the demonstrations.

America

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's view in "The Irony of American History" that "the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

SCLC SCOPE Pamphlet

This pamphlet is a product of the Summer Community Organization and Political Education project (SCOPE), a project initiated by the SCLC dedicated to increasing voter participation and political education in Alabama and throughout the South. The pamphlet highlights several common economic and political issues that face Negro communities.