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Invitation from the Negro American Labor Council to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965
Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the Negro American Labor Council, August Hill invites Dr. King to visit Racine, Wisconsin. He tells Dr. King that they are suffering from problems regarding employment in addition to all of the other inequalities. He also says that their community is not involved and that they need to be concerned about the issues in their society.

Letter from SNCC's Dorothy Miller to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Greenwood, MS

Dorothy Miller of SNCC writes Dr. King informing him of the arson attempt at the SNCC office and thanks him for a previous correspondence regarding the case of Bob Zellner.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 3, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves writes to Dora McDonald regarding copies of books that she requested Dr. King to autograph for the libraries of Mr. Enoch and Mr. Weybright. She asks Dora about their whereabouts and adds a request for Dr. King to autograph a copy for herself.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

Expenses for Delegates

Kentucky (KY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), GEORGIA, Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Texas (TX)

This detailed list breaks down the travel, registration and room costs for delegates of several Southern states throughout the country.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to F. D. Kirkpatrick

Monday, March 4, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Rev. Abernathy commends Rev. Kirkpatrick on his job with the Steering Committee and discusses the enclosure of receipts.

Letter from J. E. Hale to MLK

In this letter Hale criticizes Dr. King for being seen with Ertha Kitt asserting that Dr. King likes any type of publicity.

Letter from J. S. Beckington to MLK

Friday, June 10, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

J. S. Beckington, Secretary Treasurer at the Groton School in Massachusetts, encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Race Relations Sunday

Sunday, February 13, 1955
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America writes a message regarding race relations. The message discusses God's stance on prejudice and racism, stating that any prejudice act is against the will of God.

Organize Voter Registration in North

Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King discusses the gap in black and white voters across the US,specifically in the North. King organizes speeches and a tour across Northern cities to get blacks registered to vote.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965
Washington, D.C., California (CA)

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

Letter from Curtis Harris to MLK

Monday, February 1, 1965
Virginia (VA)

Curtis W. Harris, of the Virginia State Unit of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, wrote to Dr. King to alert him that the Smithfield Packing Company has a labor situation very similar to that of Scripto in Atlanta. Harris explains that none of the senior Negro employees are in the appropriate income bracket and could use Dr. King's assistance.

God

Dr. King cites Sigmund Freud's view in "New Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis" that the need for religion stems from the Oedipus complex.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

God

Dr. King contextualizes the speed of God.

A Lack of Jewish Soldiers

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, ITALY, VIETNAM

T.S. D'Amico writes Dr. King and others over what he perceives as a lack of Jewish men being drafted into military service.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
GREECE, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, KENYA

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Letter from MLK to Alice Sargent

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak at Temple University from the Assistant Director of Student Activities. He states that he enjoys speaking with college and university students, he gracefully declines the invitation due to his civil rights commitments in the South. He also addresses Mrs. Sargent's question presented in her letter regarding the role Temple University can play in the Civil Rights Movement. He tells her that Rev. C.T. Vivian, Dr.

Ralph Bunch Cooke's High School Report Card

Tuesday, February 28, 1967
Kentucky (KY)

This document is Ralph Bunch Cooke's report card reflecting his four years as a student at North Warren High School in Smiths Grove, Kentucky.

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. to MLK

Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. requests the presence of Dr. King to serve on a panel discussing Title VII and Equal Employment. The Department of Labor event also included civil rights lumaniaries such as A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer and Whitney Young. Roosevelt, fifth child of the late president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, served as the Chairman of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from May 26, 1965 to May 11, 1966.

Let My People Vote

New York (NY), Alabama (AL), GEORGIA, South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA)

Dr. King addresses the problem of voting that Negroes in America are encountering and also talks about SCOPE's upcoming initiatives.

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

Friday, January 14, 1966
Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, MEXICO, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Colorado (CO), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

The Kingdom

Dr. King references New Testament passages related to The Kingdom.

Letter from MLK to Senator Henry M. Jackson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Senator Henry M. Jackson expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Customer's Reciept from MLK to Morehouse College

Atlanta, GA

This document is a customer's receipt from Dr. Martin L. King Jr. to Morehouse College.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.