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Telegram from MLK to Joan Baez

Friday, December 29, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

Dr. King sends encouraging words to Joan Baez, an American singer and civil rights activist, who is imprisoned at Santa Rita Rehabilitation Center.

Letter from Irmgard Svenson

Monday, August 14, 1967
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA

Irmgard Svenson requests that Dr. King send copies of his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Letter from Jeffery Goldberg to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967
New York (NY), San Francisco, CA

In this letter, Jeffery Goldberg comments on the Vietnam War and requests a copy of Dr. King's speech to Church Laymen.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Tokyo, Japan, Atlanta, GA, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, CHINA

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 22, 1963
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the concept of freedom.

Response from MLK to Priscilla C. Spagne

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Priscilla C. Spagne for her supportive letter to the Boston Globe. He proclaims that it is important to, "Take every opportunity to make our consciences known to the public."

Letter from Ann Raynolds to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968
Vermont (VT), Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH

Ann Raynolds writes Dr. King informing him of her support for the upcoming Poor People's March to Washington. She also encloses a contribution.

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

Letter from Arthur Jordan to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Georgia (GA), CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Arthur Jordan, General Secretary of St. Thomas Young Men's Christian Association in St. Thomas, Ontario, invites Dr. King to speak at a lecture engagement in Canada.

Letter from MLK to Dr. L. K. Jackson

Tuesday, February 5, 1963
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King regretfully informs Dr. L. K. Jackson that the Sunday he wants to preach at Ebenezer is one of the three Sundays that he is obliged to preach. Dr. King states the he knows Pastor Jackson understands his schedule and he would love to have him speak at his church in the future. Dr. King connects Pastor Jackson to Reverend Abernathy so that he can preach at his church.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale, Jr. to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY

Harry Van Arsdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council AFL-CIO, informs Dr. King, who is in the Fulton County Jail, that ten thousand unionists in New York voted to support Dr. King's fight for "decency and democracy." The organization contributes $1000 to aid Dr. King in his efforts.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Greenwood, MS, Memphis, TN, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), New Hampshire (NH), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Eternal Objects

Dr. King cites Alfred North Whitehead's book "Science and the Modern World."

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK

Thursday, November 17, 1966
Chicago, IL, California (CA), VIETNAM

Mr. Sandperl writes to Dr. King regarding the direction of the SCLC. He suggest that the SCLC continue to represent social change and uphold the principles of nonviolence. However, in order to succeed, Mr. Sandperl believes that it should be done from a universal view, instead of from a Negro perspective.

Press Release for Catholic Interracial Council Award

Tuesday, August 11, 1964
Chicago, IL, Florida (FL), New York, NY

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago announces that Dr. King will be awarded the John F. Kennedy Annual Award at their 1964 benefit dinner as a tribute to his leadership. According to polls published in Newsweek magazine, Dr. King's leadership was prized "more than any other single Negro."

Immortality

Dr. King writes a quote from Goethe from Johann Peter Eckermann's "Conversations of Goethe."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edwin Fenton

Monday, July 10, 1967
Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. McDonald is responding to the letter requesting permission of the use of Dr. King's speeches. The permission was granted to the Carnegie Institute of Technology. If any other services were needed then SCLC would be at their disposal.

New York City's Salute to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York (NY)

Upon return to the US after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King was awarded the City of New York Medallion of Honor by Mayor Robert Wagner. This document is a program from the event, "Salute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." It lists the featured speakers and entertainment.

K.O. Mbadiwe Contacts MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968
London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Kingsley Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian nationalist and politician, informs Dr. King of his travels to the United States. Mbadiwe ensures that he will contact King upon arrival. Dr. King and Mbadiwe were working on a proposal for a solution to the Nigerian-Biafran civil war. A peace mission to Nigeria was planned for April 1968.

Letter from Calvin Kimbro to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Calvin Kimbro expresses his interest in famous African Americans and asks for a summary of Dr. King's life. Kimbro also wishes Dr. King luck and success in the near future.

God

Dr. King cites and comments on a passage from I Chronicles about the gods that are idols.

Royalty Statement for MLK from Joan Daves

New York, NY

In this royalty statement, Joan Daves provides a detailed report of earnings for the British edition of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Letter from Joan Finney to MLK

Tuesday, September 10, 1963
San Francisco, CA, California (CA), Atlanta, GA

California Democratic Council Secretary Joan Finney encloses the remainder of a financial contribution to Dr. King and the SCLC. Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker was the keynote speaker for an event held by the council and was presented the first part of this donation.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967
California (CA)

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

Death

Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Affidavit of Captain George Wall

Wednesday, April 10, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

George Wall, Captain of the Police Department for the City of Birmingham, submits an affidavit. The document states that a group of thirty-two Negroes led by Charles Billups and Fred Shuttlesworth were arrested for marching without a permit.

New York Mayor Wagner Remarks at Reception

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner honors Dr. King at a reception following a ceremony where he was presented the Medallion of Honor of the City of New York after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The Mayor especially commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership in nonviolence and the spirit of love, goodwill, and peacemaking that he brings to the struggle for racial justice.