The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Orangeburg, SC"

Letter from student Sue Moranian to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

Sue Moranian, a fourteen year old white girl, writes Dr. King and encloses a $2.00 contribution to assist in endeavors to help blacks reach racial equality.

Letter to Ms. Hoover from Joan Daves

Wednesday, March 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves writes Miss Carol Hoover of the SCLC to coordinate efforts to market and promote Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Willis C. Tabor to MLK

Tuesday, June 15, 1965
Chicago, IL, Selma, AL, Detroit, MI, Pennsylvania (PA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Missouri (MO)

In this letter from Willis C. Tabor to Dr. King Mr. Tabor requests an application for employment with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after his dismissal as pastor of West Side Christian Parish.


Dr. King quotes a passage from "The Historic Faith and a Changing World," by Norman Pittenger.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Letter From Heather Burke to the SCLC

Sunday, August 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Nashville, TN

Heather Burke informs the SCLC of her upcoming attendance as a student at Vanderbilt University. She wishes to volunteer with the organization.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Richard T. Andrews, Jr.

Monday, October 21, 1963
Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King express thanks for the Mt. Zion Congregational Church's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King details and outlines how their financial assistance will further foster the improvement of the racial issues in the South. The SCLC would be "caught in a dungeon of despair" if they did not have any moral support from various individuals and organizations.

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Thursday, December 27, 1962
Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

Scientific Method and God

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman on the knowledge of God being unscientific. The content of this card appears verbatim in King's doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from David Gibbons and David O. Woodward to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

David Woodyard and David Gibbons send Dr. King a check to support the work of the SCLC. Woodyard and Gibbons are employed at Denison University in Granville, Ohio.

SCLC Direction

Thursday, November 17, 1966
California (CA)

Ira Sandperl writes on what he believes should be the direction of SCLC. It is stressed that SCLC should engage in a universal nonviolent human rights movement.

Telegram from James A. Dombrowski to Lindsay Almond Jr.

Richmond, VA

James A. Dombrowski urges J. Lindsay Almond to take a stand against segregation in the city of Lynchburg. This urgency emerged as a result of the jailing of six students who sitting-in at a local diner.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King, thanking him for his financial pledge to the college and asking him to join the Morehouse men who have either paid out their pledges or whose pledges are up to date. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Gloria Glissmeyer Regarding the State of the Nation

Thursday, February 29, 1968
Honolulu, HI, Texas (TX), London, England, New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C.

The following document is a letter written by Gloria Glissmeyer discussing the state of the nation during the Spring of 1968. The letter summarizes a series of events ranging from the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorder to the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.

Ritschl (Christology)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Letter from Ann Gallagher to Dr. King, January 31, 1967

Tuesday, January 31, 1967
New York, NY

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Ann Gallagher of the Catholic School Div. of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc, was requesting the copyrights for "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," which would be featured in Father Joseph Novak's, "Christianity Today: A Book of Reading."

Religion and Intelligence

Dr. King posits a theory on a battle between "semi-intelligent religion" and "irreligious intelligence."

Letter from Bernice Lind to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1961
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the First Methodist Church in Santa Monica, California, Bernice Lind requests a copy of a speech Dr. King gave at the local Civic Auditorium.

Cooperative/Noble Competition


Dr. King writes a sermon on the topic "Cooperative Competition." King utilizes the biblical text deriving from Luke chapter 22 verse 24, which expresses how Jesus views competition. According to the text, Jesus thinks that competition is good as long as an individual competes with humility and serving others.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Detroit, MI, San Francisco, CA

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 10, 1957
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

In this sermon, Dr. King states that "love is the key to the solution of the problems which we confront in the world today." Dr. King notes that this is not a simple task, but it is necessary.

Flyer for Confront the Warmakers at the Pentagon

California (CA)

This flyer from the Southern California Mobilization Committee advertises a public meeting. At the meeting, the committee plans to provide comprehensive reports from Washington and display a slide show of recent demonstrations. In addition, they plan to discuss future SCMC activities.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA)

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

This document is a royalty statement from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. for his text "Stride Toward Freedom". June 14, 1967


Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical book of Leviticus regarding the topic of sin.


Dr. King outlines some insights regarding moral duty and sin.

Letter from Mrs. Nat Cole to Donald Frey

Thursday, May 6, 1965
Illinois (IL)

This letter was sent from Mrs. Nat (Mona) Cole to Mr. Donald S. Frey. In this letter Mrs. Cole thanks Mr. Frey for forwarding the Open Occupancy Award Certificate to her, honoring her late husband Nat King Cole.


Dr. King records a short biography of the theologian Jerome.

Telegram from Nobel Committee to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The Nobel Committee of Norwegian Parliament notifies Dr. King that he will be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.