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Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Comment On Proposed Resolution: Ending Racism in the Democratic Party

Friday, October 9, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Texas (TX), New Jersey (NJ)

On October 9th, 1964, the Democratic National Convention adopted a resolution ending racial discrimination in Party membership.

Romanticism and Rationalism

Dr. King quotes Niebuhr's statement on romanticism and rationalism from "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from Howard Sandum to MLK

Friday, September 7, 1962
New York, NY, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Howard Sandum of the Macmillan Company writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for an address that Dr. King delivered.

Letter from Dora Byron to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The assistant director for the Office of Community Educational Service at Emory University invites Dr. King to appear on a local television program. She informs Dr. King that the program will feature influential leaders from the South and consist of a 30-minute interview by an Emory faculty member. In closing, she asks Dr. King to commit to a date between March 19 and April 16, 1963.

Letter from Illinois High School Student Beth Allen to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

High school student Beth Allen writes Dr. King inquiring about how she can contribute to the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dow Kirkpatrick congratulates Dr. King and apologizes for his absence at the event.

Letter from Kendall Bryant to MLK

Sunday, October 27, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Birmingham, AL

A fourth grader from Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia writes Dr. King to inform him of a donation drive conducted by "Mrs. Magaziner's 4th grade class" for the rehabilitation of the 16th Street Baptist Church. The student requests a response letter from Dr. King to take back to the class.

Discrimination in Operations of Interstate Motor Carriers of Passenger

Wednesday, December 20, 1961
Washington, D.C.

Harold McCoy, Secretary of the United States Interstate Commerce Commission, proposes that passenger tickets should include a non-discrimination notice.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), ALGERIA

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

The Martin Luther King Column

This column, written by Dr. King, depicts his philosophy on the complete human life. He describes life to have three separate, yet connected dimensions. These dimensions are denoted as: length, breadth, and height. All are defined in great detail according to the Reverend's belief and experiences.

Dairy Agrees to Double Number of Negro Workers

Wednesday, June 22, 1966
Chicago, IL

Operation Breadbasket shares an article on the organization's letterhead, which appeared in the Chicago Sun-times. The article highlights the end of a boycott after Mellody Dairy announces a decision to more than double its Negro employees.

Negro Population

Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Virginia (VA)

This document compares the number of Negro registered voters and the potential number of registered Negro voters to the Negro population in the Southern United States.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes James A. Froude's "Short Studies on Great Subjects."

Letter from John R. Brescia to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

John R. Brescia requests to be sent campaign materials and a schedule of Dr. King's speaking engagements.

The Martin Luther King Column

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King talks about Montgomery, Alabama and the accomplishments that they have made toward civil rights.

Index Card - MLK Handwritten Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King focused on the topic, The Kingdom of God. He referenced Cave, author of 'The Christian Way.'

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. Evelyn White

Wednesday, November 22, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that he received the materials sent to him. He also notes that he is unable to make a decision regarding his schedule and availability.

The Crisis - NAACP 50 Years - Freedom Civil Rights Progress

North Carolina (NC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), Arkansas (AR), National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), United Press International, United States Federal Housing Administration., NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), National Urban League, Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA), Syracuse University, Tuskegee Institute, United States Supreme Court, United States. Congress, Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., North Carolina (NC), New York, NY, New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), SOUTH AFRICA, Little Rock, AR, Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA), New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), South Carolina (SC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Tennessee (TN), Des Moines, IA, New Hampshire (NH), Oklahoma (OK), Michigan (MI), KENYA, Alabama (AL)

This 1959 issue of The Crisis celebrates the 50th anniversary of the NAACP. The contents include events that vary from legislation cases to African-American accomplishments relevant to the time.

Telegram from Frederick Dennard to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Reverend Frederick Dennard, Executive Director of the Harlem Interfaith Counseling Service, invites Dr. King to speak at a fundraising banquet.

Telegram from MLK to the Letters Department at Newsweek Magazine

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King praises Newsweek magazine for making a persuasive appeal to the conscience and sanity of the nation on the racial crisis which engulfs America.

Science Surpasses the Social Order


Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964
Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Atlanta, GA, New Hampshire (NH), GERMANY

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Letter from Dora McDonald to K. Natwar Singh

Monday, February 8, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

Enclosed is an article that was originally sent to Mr. K. Natwar Singh from Dr. King. The article discusses Jawaharial Nehru and his fight for peace. In the article, Dr. King expresses the importance of Nehru's beliefs to the United States.

Letter from Fran to Dr. & Mrs. King

Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA), Ohio (OH), Indiana (IN)

Fran writes Dr. and Mrs. King to thank them for their hospitality during her stay at their home.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967
New York, NY

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 6, 1967
New York (NY)

Joan Daves sends Dora McDonald a letter of thanks concerning a photostat of a letter sent to Dr. King. She also informs her that although the title of Dr. King's book has been used, one cannot copyright titles.