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"Orangeburg, SC"

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

Wednesday, April 25, 1962

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Public Affairs Memorandum

Monday, December 27, 1965

Vice President Humphrey is quoted as saying, "This is a pragmatic program - what's best is what works", in describing the Office of Economic Opportunity program. This public affairs memorandum details the efforts of the organization as it pertains to the anti-poverty movement.

Letter from Rev. Herbert H. Eaton to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1963

Reverend Eaton, pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, congratulates Dr. and Mrs. King on the birth of their child, Edith Bernice.

Man's Dilemma

Dr. King states that man’s dilemma results from “the divorce of nature from the supernatural.”

Letter from Sixth Grader to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Kathy Brewster, an African American sixth grade student from Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude towards Dr. King for helping the Negro race.

Telegram from George M. Houser to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

In this telegram, dated April 12, 1966, Mr. Houser requests Dr. King's help in leading a march on First National Bank of New York. Due to bank loans to South Africa, several hundred students are showing support by withdrawing their accounts.

The Luminous Promise

Saturday, December 1, 1962

This draft of "The Luminous Promise," published in the December 1962 issue of The Progressive, marks the 100th celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the article Dr. King writes, "there is but one way to commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. That is to make its declaration of freedom real."

Western Union Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Count Basie to Dr. King

Famous jazz musician, Count Basie and his wife Catherine, sent Dr. King this Western Union telegram, following Dr. King's nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem. The Basie family, offered Dr. King any assistance he may have needed during his recovery.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Christianity

Dr. King finds agreement with Celsus, an opponent of Christianity, in a quote on the root of the Christian faith.

Telegram from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Questioning and Paper Proofs

In this telegram Joan Daves is asking Dr. King to telephone regarding questioning on paper proofs that need to go back to the printer the next day.

Telegram from Terrence Hallinan to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

Mr. Hallinan requests Dr. King's assistance in aiding a service member undergoing a "court martial for refusal to go to Vietnam."

Letter from Clarence D. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Director of the Southern Region of the National Urban League, Clarence D. Coleman, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the 1964 Nobel Piece Prize. Coleman extends his very best wishes to Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of the staff of the Southern Regional Office of the National Urban League and the officers and members of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference.

Letter from Jackie Robinson to MLK

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Jackie Robinson writes Dr. King to accept a position of responsibility with the SCLC.

Letter from Charles Merrill to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Mr. Charles Merrill, Headmaster of the Commonwealth School in Boston, MA, requests that Dr. King support Mr. Danilo Dolci's candidacy for the Nobel Peace Prize that year

Letter from Dan C. Lortie to MLK

Monday, May 23, 1966

Professor Dan Lortie of the University of Chicago invites Dr. King to speak at the Colver-Rosenberger Lecture Series.

The Bill of Rights Poem

Monday, July 30, 1962

Dr. Alfred G. Suarez writes a poem regarding the necessity of the Bill of Rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Grayson

Thursday, February 15, 1962

Dora McDonald informs William Grayson that Dr. King's schedule does not permit him to make any more appearances in the year of 1962. Miss McDonald expresses her deep apologies for Dr. King's inabilities to attend.

Letter from Robert J. Beaubien to MLK

Friday, December 18, 1964

Robert Beaubien congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Partial Transcript: Speech at Guardian Association

Dr. King discusses the events in Montgomery, Alabama as a catalyst in what will become a new world. He stresses that the honor he receives from the Garden Association is not just for him, but for the fifty thousand supporters of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

The New York Herald Tribune Articles Concerning Vietnam

Friday, November 23, 1962

These copies of several news articles denounce United States military involvement in the Vietnam War.
The New York Herald Tribune claims the there is no formal program to inform the public about what is happening in Vietnam.
The Nation claims that the United States Army is being used to bolster a brutal dictatorship in an undeclared war.
The Washington Star carried an Associated Press report on children with napalm burns.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding the "Times"

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, provided a detailed advertisement schedule for his latest book "Why We Can't Wait." Advertisements appeared in the Times, Harper, The Atlantic, Christian Herald and the Christian Century to name a few.

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Friday, December 3, 1965

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

Letter from Shelley Winters Franciosa to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1959

Actress Shelley Winters sends Dr. King her personal copy of "The Diary of Anne Frank" after he and Mrs. King attend a screening for the film adaptation in New York. Winters would go on to receive an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for the film.

Letter from John A. Race to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Congressman Race of Wisconsin thanks Dr. King for his letter concerning the seating of the Mississippi Delegates. Race seems to suggest that he was of the majority who "did authorize their formal acceptance" although he states that he was in the "minority."

Science (Definition)

Dr. King records a definition of science.