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Memo from Barbara Moffett to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

Barbara W. Moffett writes a memorandum to Dr. King and Harry Wachtel, commenting on a second draft statement submitted by the American Friends Service Committee to the SCLC. Ms. Moffett also sends a copy of the memo with a handwritten note to Andy Young.

Death

Dr. King quotes Nels Frederick Solomon Ferré on the subject of death from his book Evil and the Christian Faith.

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Outward Form)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion." The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

Service of Dedication

Sunday, May 29, 1966
Brooklyn, NY, New York, NY, New York (NY)

This program outlines the schedule for a service held at Cornerstone Baptist Church Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King and Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller are featured as guest speakers.

New York Times: US Judge Forbids A House Inquiry; Panel is Defiant

Tuesday, August 16, 1966
VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This article discusses the decision of a federal judge, ordering the House Committes of Un-American Activities to not hold a hearing on a bill that would make it illegal for Americans to aid the Vietcong.

Letter from Douglas B. Leeds to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968
Massachusetts (MA)

Douglas Leeds, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at Babson Institute of Business Administration, writes Dr. King to request any information regarding his political views. He also invites Dr. King to speak at the Institute in the future.

Race Problem

Dr. King discusses the solution to the race problem, citing Reinhold Niebuhr's view that human methods are irrational.

Letter from The Norwegian Church to MLK and Friends

Wednesday, December 9, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

A member of the Norwegian Church extends congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.

Letter from James H. MacDonald to MLK

Friday, June 16, 1967
Missouri (MO)

James MacDonald asks Dr. King to send a statement regarding his personal struggles to assist with the sermon MacDonald will deliver to his congregation. MacDonald also seeks advice on how to integrate his church.

Letter from Sydney J. Chase to MLK

Wednesday, March 16, 1960
New York (NY)

Mr. Chase, a political science major at Hofstra College, has reached out to Dr.King inquiring about assistance with his term paper on "non-violence as a political force."

Housing Plan at Gadsden Is Upheld

Thursday, October 11, 1962
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Negroes in Gadsden, Alabama who wanted to stop urban redevelopment plan which would segregate the Negroes.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK

Tuesday, May 25, 1965
New York, NY

This letter to Dr.King from a supporter emphasizes the need for reform in the SCLC. Particularly with its writings. He tells Dr.King the need for editing grammatical errors on SCLC literature. He believes he has a workable plan to make changes that would better serve Dr.King and the movement.

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

Marxism

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from Mrs. Eva Claytor to MLK

Wednesday, December 14, 1966
New York (NY)

In this letter Mrs. Claytor of New York, NY, identifies herself as an "admirer" and is writing to inform Dr. King that his proposed book title "Where Do We Go From Here [sic]" conflicts with a previously published and copyrighted work of the same title in England.

Letter from Reverend Virgil W. Glanton to SCLC

Saturday, June 18, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

In this letter, Reverend Virgil Glanton gives a contribution to SCLC and offers support for the Meredith March.

Letter from Carolyn B. Russell to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Carolyn B. Russell is a high school student in support of Dr. King and informs him about different aspects of her life. As a result of living in her single mother's household, Carolyn desires employment and to continue her education.

Letter from George Y. Sodowick to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968
Washington, D.C., San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

George Sodowick expresses to Dr. King disapproval of the planned Poor Peoples Campaign of 1968. Sodowick suggests that, instead of occupying Washington, the demonstrators should settle in and enhance "riot torn cities."

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes John M. E. McTaggart's "Some Dogmas of Religion."

SCLC Annual Board Meeting Agenda

Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Alabama (AL)

This 1965 SCLC annual board meeting agenda lists several key figures who are intended to discuss their respective projects and strategies during this two-day session.

Letter from Benjamin F. Smith to the Editor of Detroit Free Press

Friday, March 31, 1967
Detroit, MI, CHINA, VIETNAM, CUBA, JAPAN

In a letter to the editor of the Detroit Free Press, Benjamin Smith criticizes US involvement in Vietnam. He advocates ending the war as 80% of South Vietnamese people want peace, while 67% of Americans "favor a rough war."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gardner Lattimer

VIETNAM

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Lattimer for his letter expressing support for Dr. King and his work. He then talks about the importance of making the number of those seeking peace through non-violence known to the public and the government. King continues, commenting on the War in Vietnam and the international adoption of peace through non-violence.

Letter from Govenor Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, September 5, 1962
New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller encloses a copy of "The Future of Federalism." His book "traces the development of the federal idea in the United States."

Letter from Harold Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 14, 1964
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Tacoma, Washington native Harold Bass sends a contribution to aid in the work of the Civil Rights Movement. Bass, pastor of his own independent church, also forwards Dr. King a copy of their newsletter that promotes peace efforts all over the country.

MLK Note Card - Schleiermacher, Theology and God-consciousness

The person to whom Dr. King is referring is the German philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher.

And There Was Love

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

Monday, April 1, 1968
Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C.

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.