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MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Adverse Letter from J. H. Moore to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

J. H. Moore expresses his dislike for Dr. King's leadership style. He argues that Dr. King's efforts have stirred up hatred and discontent, even amongst black citizens.

Letter from Yolanda Riverra to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Yolanda Riverra, a student, writes to Mrs. King expressing sympathy for Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Louis Rome to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

Louis Rome, Executive Director of the Michigan Commission on Crime, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the Governor's conference being held in Detroit.

National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket

This schedule for the National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket provides a description of the topics to be covered during the convention.

Telegram from David Livingston to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

David Livingston and Cleveland Robinson, on behalf of their district of the AFL-CIO, send encouragement to Dr. King.

Carbon Copy Letter from Dr. King to Joan Daves Regarding rights of "Strength To Love"

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King acknowledges that he is in receipt of Joan Daves letter about the schedule on June 8, as well as, the letter concerning the offer for the Japanese rights of "Strength To Love".

Letter from MLK to Reverend Charles R. Bell Jr. about Beating of a Prisoner

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

In this correspondence, Dr. King offers thanks to Rev. Bell for his letter about the "horrible beating" of a Negro prisoner in Wetumpka, Alabama.

Letter from Thomas Hirst to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

Thomas E. Hirst re-extends Dr. King an invitation for a speaking engagement at the Law School Forum of the University of Alberta. The Law School Forum publicly presents many intellectuals to present to their audience and provide community service. Mr. Hirst asserts that Canada serves as a neighbor to the United States and is concerned with the Civil Rights Movement.

Grotius

Dr. King writes that Grotius' view was "that God should be thought of as 'a great moral ruler'" and that Christ's death was "but a tribute to the sanctity of a divine government."

Philosophy of Life (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes G. K. Chesterton’s “Heretics.”

MLK Note Card - "Immortality"

On this handwritten notecard, entitled, simply, "Immortality," Dr. King quotes Tennyson on the subject.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Family Planning-A Special and Urgent Concern

Thursday, May 5, 1966

This document contains Dr. King's response on receiving the Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the Fiftieth Anniversary Banquet of Planned Parenthood-World Population. Margaret Sanger is famous for opening the first birth control clinic in the USA and establishing Planned Parenthood. Dr. King discusses the benefits of family planning for the Negro family, as well as similarities between his and Margaret' Sanger's efforts for equality. Also featured is a photograph of Coretta Scott King accepting the award on Dr. King's behalf.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Ralph Bunche inquires if Dr. King and his wife will be available for lunch and dinner with himself and members of the United Nations before leaving for Oslo.

Letter from Donald Prince to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Donald Prince wrote this letter the day after Dr. King's assassination and addressed it to Mrs. King.

Telegram from MLK to Derhanov Dinke

Dr. King informs Ambassador Derhanov Dinke that it is his pleasure to serve as Honorary President for the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He invites Ambassador Dinke to attend a luncheon at the Sheraton Carlton Hotel in Washington, D. C.

Letter from Joe Cheru to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Joe Cheru advises Dr. King to adopt a technique called "organized massive write-in." Using this method, he suggested that Dr. King could channel greater support from people who could not participate directly by being physically present for demonstrations.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King concerning his visit to North Carolina that was cut short in order to stay out of the media.

Letter from MLK to Margo

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Margo for her inquiry about summer work with the SCLC and suggests she contact Hosea Williams about the SCOPE project for the following summer.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. Lamm

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves corresponds with a German citizen regarding a recent request to submit Dr. King's book Why We Can't Wait to a German publisher.

Letter from Orville Freeman to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

The author informs Dr. King of the efforts being made to adequately address the issues pertaining to nutritional health in the country.

Itinerary for MLK

In this correspondence, a list of "appearances" for Dr. King is listed.

The Dexter Echo: Christianity & Curiosity

Wednesday, September 7, 1960

Congregation members and supporters of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama are informed of monthly programming and important updates, including the recent change in pastoral leadership from Dr. Martin Luther King to Rev. Herbert H. Eaton.

Letter from Edward Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1963

Edward Crawford of New York encloses a quotation for Dr. King to keep in his possession. The quotation centers around individuals who continue to be slient about serious issues that matter.

Letter from James Degener to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Lutheran Church youth advisor James Degener asks that Dr. King assist him in showing a group of teenagers life around the dilapidated side of Chicago. Degener's goal is to expose the young people to the crippling and tragic conditions of the inner city. At the time of this correspondence, Dr. King and SCLC were in the midst of an open housing campaign in Chicago, known as the Chicago Freedom Movement.

The Power of Silence

Dr. King provides an account of several passages from the Bible, outlining his notes and interpretation.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

Letter from Emmitt LaMarr to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967

Emmitt LaMarr writes Dr. King about the status of his proposal to the National Dairy Products Corporation regarding Operation Breadbasket. Although LaMarr does not hold an executive position with the corporation, he assures Dr. King his efforts are not in vain.

Letter From Joseph Livingston to MLK Regarding Receipt of Letter

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Here Joseph Livingston beckons Dr. King to confirm receipt of a letter sent in reference to what he describes as "a matter of Life and Death".