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Letter from The Bulstrode School Children to MLK

The Bulstrode school children write Dr. King concerning their initiative to fundraise for the Negro children in Mississippi and Alabama. They expressed to Dr. King how they decided to sell daffodils that were grown from their own gardens.

Letter from John Moorman to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

John Moorman, President of the Student Christian Association at Guilford College, invites Dr. King to be the speaker for their Religious Emphasis Week in April of 1968. Moorman discusses details of the arrangement, including Dr. King's honorarium and travel expenses.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

Letter from Pauline Lee to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

Pauline Lee withdraws her support from Dr. King due to his failure to withdraw support for Adam Clayton Powell.

William James

Dr. King briefly discusses philosopher William James and his lectures entitled "The Variety of Religious Experience."

A Supplemental Appropriation for the Office of Economic Opportunity

In this proposal, the Office of Economic Opportunity states that the Administration would like to fund the National Alliance of Businessmen out of the Office of Economic Opportunity appropriations. The Administration also doesn't wish to seek supplemental funds for special summer programs. These decisions could result in a reduction of funding in various programs like Head Start and Job Corps.

Letter from Byron L. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, January 14, 1967

Byron L. Johnson questions the accountability and lack of trust within the House of Representatives. Furthermore, Mr. Johnson suggest the House of Representatives create a new code of ethics, observe due process of law, and ensure the financial validity of all candidates.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights Address by MLK

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Dr. King speaks at a luncheon launching the Gandhi Society on May 17, 1962, citing the great significance of the day: the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision declaring school segregation unconstitutional, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the centennial of the death of Henry David Thoreau, whose essay on civil disobedience influenced Gandhi. He announces that earlier that day he sent President Kennedy a document seeking an executive order proclaiming all forms of segregation to be a violation of the US Constitution.

MLK Statement Regarding Housing Proposal in Chicago

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

Robert Clifton Weaver, the first United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, encloses a statement made by Dr. King for Joseph Califano, assistant to President Johnson. Dr. King announces a slum area housing redevelopment project in the Chicago areas of Lawndale, East Garfield Park and Kenwood Oakland.

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.

New Politics Convention. Chicago, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from the Algemeen Handelsblad to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

C. A. Steketee, chief editor of Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad, asks Dr. King to write an article about the American Civil Rights Movement.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 31: 29, 30.

Transcript of Tape Recording of Mr. Hanna Nazzal

Wednesday, June 21, 1967

This document is a transcript of a tape recording of the President of Terra Santa Tourist Company, Mr. Hanna Nazzal, that was sent to Dr. King and Rev. Andrew Young.

Schleiermacher (Religion More Than Dogma)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Kierkegaard

Dr. King sketches notes on "the most original thinker in Danish history."

Press Conference on the Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Dr. King and SCLC members have accepted the invitation to join the fight for a quality integrated education for the children of Chicago.

Schleiermacher's Meaning of Religion

Dr. King cites a quotation from Friedrich Schleiermacher's perception of the meaning of religion. Schleiermacher asserts that the soul is dissolved in the immediate feeling of the infinite and eternal. Dr. King notes that in order for one to understand the externals of religion, we must first have the inner experience.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

Request For Meeting Telegram From Dr. King To Mayor Daley of Chicago

Sunday, March 13, 1966

This telegram dated March 14, 1966, was sent to Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley of Chicago from Dr. King. Dr. King asks the Mayor if he can meet with him in city hall, along with other religious leaders. He wants to discuss with the Mayor about considering programs to eliminate slums,expand health services, and to improve employment and job training opportunities for the people of Chicago.

Schleiermacher (The Church)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “The Christian Faith.”

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, August 26, 1964

Dr. King is invited by A. Philip Randolph to attend a birthday party for well known Presbyterian minister, socialist and pacifist Norman Thomas. Randolph requests that Dr. King participate as a sponsor for Thomas' birthday celebration.

Letter from Alice Houghton Sherill to MLK

On behalf of the Detroit Women for Dr. Martin Luther King, Alice Houghton Sherrill thanks Dr. King for the envelopes received from his secretary. Mrs. Sherrill extends her welcome to Dr. King for his upcoming visit to Detroit and offers the group's assistance during his stay.

Letter from Thomas Price to MLK

Thursday, October 8, 1964

Major Thomas Price, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance in retaining his commission and active duty service with the United States Army.

Death

Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Selma Friendship Day Report

This document highlights information surrounding "Selma Friendship Day," which was a white-led counter-protest intended to offset the effects of Kingian boycotts. This counter-protest was met with a demonstration, in which 120 pro-Kingian persons were arrested and the local SCLC office was barricaded.

Letter from the Mississippi Club to MLK

Monday, January 14, 1963

Officials of the Mississippi Club make a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and offer a prayer for Dr. King.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Rev. Ralph Abernathy sends best wishes to Dr. King and everyone affiliated with the Civil Rights Movement. Rev. Abernathy is disheartened because he is not present to assist with the movement, but assures Dr. King that he wants to be an active participant.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966

Here Joan Daves informs Dr. King on the availability of Hermine Popper, who will be working on a manuscript with Dr. King.