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Coretta Scott King - Soprano

Friday, July 10, 1959
Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL)

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1962

In this letter to Dr. King, Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College informs Dr. King about the meeting with Robert Troutman on matters that involve input from President Kennedy.

Letter from Members of a French Church to Dr. King

Monday, January 22, 1968
FRANCE

Members of the Paul - Gerhardt Church in Cologne, France send Dr. King birthday greetings.

Letter from Roy T. Poorman to Philadelphia Tribune Editor

Monday, July 12, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, GERMANY

Roy T. Poorman writes the editor of the Philadelphia Tribune regarding an article by Morris I. Liebman that opposed "negro civil rights protest demonstrations." Poorman identifies Liebman as a person of Jewish descent and compares the techniques of Dr. King to Biblical leader Moses. Poorman also discusses the lack of action by Jews in America or Germany prior to the genocide of 6,000,000 Jews along with the recent discrimination of the Jewish people in other countries. He writes in support of Dr. King's approach.

Letter from Wendell Morgan to SCLC

Monday, July 31, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Wendell Morgan encloses a check to SCLC on behalf of the Howard University Campus Chest.

Job and Suffering

Dr. King writes on the biblical figure Job and his view of suffering.

Letter from Member of SCLC to James Harrison

Wednesday, March 22, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The letter's author encloses copies of recent checks made payable to the SCLC and contact information for individual and organizational contributors.

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."

A Background Paper for the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing

Friday, December 2, 1966
Delaware (DE), Washington, D.C.

This paper is intended to catalyze discussion at the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing. By providing facts and analysis pertaining to Wilmington and surrounding areas, the paper is written to help familiarize attendees of the housing situation in Delaware. A key goal is to educate on the racial disparity and deterioration of urban areas. "The national housing objective is to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing to all people" and this document encourages the execution of developed solutions.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Annalee Stewart, Legislative and Branch Liaison for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, invites Dr. King to speak at the organization's fiftieth anniversary banquet. She provides a historic backdrop for the organization and explains its current focus on "Peace, Freedom and Bread."

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Press Conference Statement on New York

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
New York (NY)

Dr. King addresses the city of New York and the problem of mounting violence. Dr. King urges the city to help take a stand by promoting social justice through nonviolence efforts and strategies.

Get Well Letter from Albert Adams to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, September 20, 1958
New York, NY

Out of the many well wishes sent to Dr. King, he received one in particular from this New York inmate, Albert Adams. Mr. Adams wished Dr. King a full recovery and prayed that he would not, again, endure the same hardship.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable J. Caleb Boggs

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Senator James Caleb Boggs of Delaware to commend his role in "forging the bi-partisan unity" that made possible the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Georgia (GA), New Hampshire (NH), VIETNAM

Abram Eisenman, a 1968 candidate for President of the United States, requested Dr. King's assistance in his campaign for the New Hampshire ballot.

Letter from Medora S. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA

Medora Bass, member of the Planned Parenthood Association in Philadelphia, invites Dr. King to speak at their annual luncheon. Bass states, "You would render a great service to the underprivileged in Philadelphia."

"Open Hearings Bill Offered in House"

Jackson, MS

This article addresses political concerns in Jackson, Mississippi, as introduced by John Perkins and Ralph Sowell Jr. The "freedom of information" act will allow the public to be active and aware of political actions. Any violation of this act will result in a penalty for the individual or organization.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to the President of the SCLC, addresses Attorney General Eugene Cook regarding a conversation that was agreed to be private. Despite this agreement, the conversation was publicized to United Press International. Mr. Walker expresses his frustration and announces his next steps to the Attorney General.

SCLC Citizenship Workbook

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), North Carolina (NC), Florida (FL)

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Outward Form)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion." The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

SCLC Newsletter: April 1962

Sunday, April 1, 1962
Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Chattanooga, TN, Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Jackson, MS, Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Ohio (OH), Shreveport, LA, South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces five new members will join the staff. The five men are: John H. Calhoun, Herbert V. Coulton, James L. Bevel, Fred C. Bennette, and Bernard S. Lee. These men derive from different locations across America and add different levels of education and commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Friedman

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Oregon (OR)

In this letter Ms. Dora McDonald informs Mr. Friedman of the University of Oregon that Dr. King's schedule will not allow for a contribution to "Forensic Quarterly". Such regrets were increasingly frequent occurrences as Dr. King’s prominence and workload grew.

abstract needed

Friday, March 8, 1968
KENYA, TANZANIA, UGANDA, SOMALIA, ZAMBIA, ETHIOPIA, CONGO / ZAIRE, MOROCCO, NIGERIA, NIGER, TOGO, GHANA, LIBERIA, SENEGAL

Letter from Peter P. Bland to MLK

Sunday, April 3, 1966
London, England, Montgomery, AL, UNITED KINGDOM, Alabama (AL)

Peter Bland seeks Dr. King's autograph to add to his collection.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Letter from Robert H. Goldsmith to MLK

Saturday, April 15, 1967
North Carolina (NC), VIETNAM, Virginia (VA)

Robert Goldsmith sends a contribution and expresses his support of Dr. King's Christian methods to attain full integration and civil rights. He discusses Dr. King's campaign to end the Vietnam War and asserts that the country is engaged in an immoral action in Southeast Asia.

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Sunday, February 11, 1968
St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, California (CA), South Dakota (SD), New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

This critical 2-day strategy meeting of key SCLC staff takes place 2 months prior to the projected start of the Poor People’s Campaign in Washington, DC. Dr. King expresses concern that they have not met their target goals for participation. Debate ensues about whether to call off the campaign or push it to a later date, and also whether SCLC should abandon all of its other commitments to ensure the success of this project. Problems and solutions are discussed. Staff assignments made for recruitment of the poor, materials, organizational structure, tentative plan of action, D.C.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

Philosophy of History

Dr. King quotes a statement regarding history from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness."