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God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Jeremiah 3:12.

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

Letter from Billy E. Bowles to MLK about an Interview

Monday, March 27, 1967

In this letter Billy E. Bowles requests an interview with Dr. King. Bowles is especially interested in Dr. King's perception of the new governor, Governor Maddox.

University of Wisconsin Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

This is a contract from the Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago signed by Darrel R. Douglas, of the University of Wisconsin. It records the stipulations agreed upon for Dr. King to deliver a speech.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Wachman

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Dr. King informs Dr. Wachman, that due to his extremely busy schedule and his particular attention to the South, he will not be able to accept an invitation to speak at Lincoln University.

Letter from MLK to Winifred Menehart

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this document, Dr. King is truly appreciative of the encouraging letter he received from Mrs. Winfred Menehart, a native of Minnesota. Dr. King emphasizes on the positivity that rests within her letter, as a facet of hope, amid the contrasting assaults and criticisms he receives daily.

Letter from J. T. Brooks to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

Monday, November 16, 1953

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church representative J. T. Brooks conveys the church's interest in considering Dr. King for the pastorate.

Tribute to Dr. King by Rev. Joseph L. Roberts

Friday, April 5, 1968

In this document, Rev. Joseph L. Roberts, Presiding Elder for the West Detroit District of the AME church, delivered this profound tribute to Dr. King, the day after his assassination.

Letter from Dr. E. Wolf to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964

Professor Dr. E. Wolf, Chairman of the International Peace Bureau, writes Dr. King expressing the bureau's desire to have him as a guess speaker at their annual conference in Norway.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967

The author writes Dr. King and questions his motives for speaking so "rashly" against the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Sunday, April 25, 1965

This statement by Father Dom T. Orsini expounds on the details of the March 21-26, 1965 Selma-Montgomery March. Orsini expresses that he is proud of the youth and their enthusiasm in participating in the march and suggests that insisting improper relations took place would be ridiculous.

Letter from Mrs. Eva Claytor to MLK

Wednesday, December 14, 1966

In this letter Mrs. Claytor of New York, NY, identifies herself as an "admirer" and is writing to inform Dr. King that his proposed book title "Where Do We Go From Here [sic]" conflicts with a previously published and copyrighted work of the same title in England.

MLK's Gadsden, Alabama Rally Speech

Friday, June 21, 1963

This transcript of Dr. King's address during the Gadsden, Alabama Rally addresses the ills of segregation in the South. He professes that the accusation of civil rights demonstrations being responsible for creating tension is equivalent to blaming the act of robbery on the wealth of man.

Letter from Berwyn Jones to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Berwyn Jones offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his strong stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The letter is written a day after Dr. King makes his famous speech entitled "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" at Riverside Church in New York.

Letter from MLK to Anna Frank

Monday, May 7, 1956

Dr. King informs Mrs. Frank, assistant to Dr. Chalmers, of his travel arrangements to New York where he is set to speak at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund dinner.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves issued this royalty statement for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

News Release: $30 Billion Omnibus Bill for Jobs, Education and Housing Presented to SCLC Convention

Friday, August 18, 1967

This press release is an overview of Congressman John Conyers, Jr.'s "Full Opportunity Act of 1967."

Letter from MLK to Canon Hugh Monteflore

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Dr. King declines Canon Hugh Montefiore invitation to speak at the University Church in Cambridge, England due to his pastoral duties at his own church.

Letter from Ms. Dorothy Clark to Rev. Abernathy

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter accompanying a contribution, Ms. Clark expresses her condolences after Dr. King's assassination and pledges her personal support in continuing his mission.

Memorandum from Jacob Seidenberg to Participants

Monday, May 11, 1959

Jacob Seidenberg, the Executive Director of the President's Committee on Government Contracts, provides details on the agenda to the participants in the Religious Leaders Conference. Dr. King was one of those participants.

Soul Force and Woman Power

This notecard titled Soul Force refers to a Woman Power March to be held on June 19, 1968

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Vernon W. Stone

Dr. King commends Dr. Vernon Stone on his superb teaching career and upcoming move to become the first Negro professor at a University in Atlanta.