Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Oslo, Norway"

Letter from C. Kenzie Steele to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962

C. Kenzie Steele writes Dr. King to thank him for his "expression of encouragement" for the celebration of his Tenth Anniversary as pastor of Bethel Baptist Church.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Letter from G. P. Beckman to MLK

Thursday, November 3, 1960

G. P. Beckman writes to Dr. King expressing his appreciation for people of similar faith. He asserts that he loves the black race as a whole and because of this love he does not want his children to grow up and experience similar persecutions.

Conference on Strengthening the New Politics

Monday, December 20, 1965

Paul Albert forwards this letter to all individuals invited to and interested in the Shoreham Conference, in which Liberals address the shortcomings of American politics.

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

Friday, January 14, 1966

Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

Letter from James P. Twomey to P. N. Brownstein

Monday, September 23, 1968

James Twomey writes P. N. Brownstein to express his pleasure in receiving Mr. Brownstein's letter informing him of the $4,000,000 the FHA-HUD has allocated for the housing rehabilitation program that Dr. King proposed.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Rev. William J. Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 29, 1962

Rev. William J. Shaw, pastor of White Rock Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, contributes $100.00 to the SCLC and their works involving the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Lawrence J. Rozman to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Lawrence J. Rozman, who identifies himself as a white Catholic, is in admiration of Dr. King's avenue of execution to the racial issues in the United States. In addition, Mr. Rozman requests to become a member of the SCLC.

Telegrams from MLK to the Kennedys

Dr. King informs President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the bombings and police behavior in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King suggests that if desegregation does not occur the city will experience a "racial holocaust."

Draft Speech for Atlanta Nobel Peace Prize Reception

Dr. King drafts a speech that he will make in Atlanta for the reception honoring his Nobel Peace Prize winning. In the speech he offers his gratitude to friends and family who supported him in his efforts. Dr. King also briefly discusses the issue of racial injustice and the continued fight for equality.

Excerpts of Letters Written About Vietnam War

This document includes excerpts from letters written by Mary Agnes Blonien, sister of an American nurse at the Minh Quy Hospital at Kontum, South Vietnam. Moved to the point of tears, the nurse shares her thoughts and gives a vivid account of the war conditions in Vietnam, and expresses empathy for both Americans and Vietnamese.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Reverend Goulding

Reverend Goulding encloses a copy of a letter from Dr. King to Dr. Ruden.

Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America

Stokely Carmichael and Dr. Charles Hamilton are in partnership with SNCC to promote the Black Power Movement. SNCC creates "freedom gifts" to provide the community with the expression of the "humanistic spirit" and goal of the movement. These freedom gifts range from posters, poetry, calendars, and more.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Letter from Robert Bartlett to MLK

The minister of the First Congregational Church sends encouraging words to Dr. King after his attack in Harlem, New York.

Schleiermacher (Religion More Than Dogma)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Arvella Gray to MLK

Arvella Gray sends Dr. King some records for the congregation of Ebenezer Baptist Church to sing along with some of their pictures.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Saturday, May 23, 1964

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller thanks Dr. King for sending an advance copy, with inscription, of his new book.

People in Action: Albany Justice

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

Letter from James Haughton to a Friend regarding Fundraising

Thursday, February 1, 1968

In this letter James Houghton, of the Committee for a Winter Confrontation with Congress, appeals to friends for financial support of the "poor peoples lobby."

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Holiday Card to Mrs. King

This holiday card was sent to Mrs. King from the Miller Family.

Erasmus

Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

Letter to Dr. King from Elder G.W. Watkins

Friday, August 2, 1957

Elder G. W. Watkins writes Dr. King requesting that he and his organization join the fight to regain Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) title as the Heavy Weight Boxing Champion of the World.

Letter from Mary E. Peabody to MLK

Thursday, June 29, 1967

Mary E. Peabody writes a letter requesting that Dr. King send her a copy of one of his books along with a signature. She also informs him of her opinion on education and the racial issues the city of Boston faces.

Project "C" Progress Report

Thursday, March 28, 1963

Detailed progress report on a project that is referred to as Project "C."

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

Monday, August 29, 1966

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

Telegram from George M. Houser to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

In this telegram, dated April 12, 1966, Mr. Houser requests Dr. King's help in leading a march on First National Bank of New York. Due to bank loans to South Africa, several hundred students are showing support by withdrawing their accounts.