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Knox, John

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on John Knox.

The Free Southern Theater

New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA)

The Free Southern Theater was co-founded by members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They toured throughout the South, performing free of charge in Negro communities that had no theater, as a cultural and education extension of the Civil Rights Movement.

United Nations Association-Hawaii Chapter

Monday, April 8, 1968
Honolulu, HI

The card, shown here, is an expression of condolence and gratitude from the Hawaii chapter of the United Nations Association, in the form of a "lei of love".

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Patripassianism"

Dr. King outlines "Patripassianism" .This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

GHANA, ISRAEL

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Program - Thompson Memorial Chapel-Williams College

Sunday, April 16, 1961

This document is a Sunday service program from Thompson Memorial Chapel at Williams College. Dr. King is noted as a guest preacher.

Article Regarding Harry Belafonte and Associates Denied Service

Friday, June 1, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This article states, Harry Belafonte and associates were denied lunch service at the King's Inn Restaurant. Dr. King issued a statement that no action will be taken at the present time, due to the loss of several distinguished leaders in a recent air disaster.

Letter from Peter Seeger to MLK

New York (NY), Tokyo, Japan

American folk singer, songwriter and activist Peter Seeger shares with Dr. King a previous experience appearing on a television program in Tokyo. Seeger recommends the program as an excellent means to communicate with the Japanese people.

Mission to Mississippi : Invitation to a Conference

Jackson, MS, Berkeley, CA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

This document lists Dr. King and other clergymen as they invite selected religious leaders to a conference entitled "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission is in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It will be a one day event to be held in Jackson, Mississippi on July 20, 1961.

Telegram from Rev. Harold Carlson to MLK

Thursday, September 19, 1963
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Reverend Harold E. Carlson sends words of encouragement to Dr. King. Carlson prays for continued strength and courage for King's "holy cause."

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, Washington, D.C.

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher

Dr. King compares the thoughts of German theologian's Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Institute for Human Relations LBJ Leaflet

Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York, NY

This is a debit memo for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Advance

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses advance payment from Harper & Row for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here."

The Baccalaureate Service of Keuka College

Sunday, June 16, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King gives the baccalaureate sermon for Keuka College on June 16, 1963.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Iowa (IA)

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964
Florida (FL)

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, February 10, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, contacts Dr. King again about speaking at the organization's annual meeting. She informs Dr. King that she needs a response soon in order to put the information in the newspaper.

Telegram from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves inquires if Dr. King can attend the January Herald Tribune Book and Author Luncheon.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."

Telegram from MLK Congratulating Georgia Legislators Elect

Friday, June 18, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King congratulates Grace Hamilton, William Alexander, Julian Bond, J. D. Grier, and J. C. Daugherty on their recent election to the Legislature of the State of Georgia. He offers his support in "our quest for freedom and human dignity."

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Operation Breadbasket

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Operation Breadbasket outlines the results of negotiations between them and the Coca-Cola Bottling Company located in Chicago, Illinois. The negotiations brought about the opening of thirty-nine positions in the company that will be filled by Negro employees.

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

Birmingham, AL

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.

Letter from Rev. Jesse Jackson to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Chicago, IL

In an effort to make Operation Breadbasket successful ,the SCLC held seminars to help the negro businessmen develop their businesses. Jackson invites Dr. King and anyone else he wants to bring as an informal resource during the seminar.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964
Philadelphia, PA

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C., Denver, CO

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

Sunday, September 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), South Africa, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Howard University, Atlanta, GA, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, MEXICO, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.