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Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Telegram from Clark Macgregor to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Clark Macgregor sends a telegram to Dr. King informing him of his vote against the dismissal of the Mississippi Challenge.

MLK's Column on Jackie Robinson's Induction in Hall of Fame

Saturday, August 4, 1962

In this column from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King echoes his speech at the induction of Jackie Robinson into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Robinson not only broke the color barrier in major league baseball, MLK points out, he succeeded in business. MLK lauds Robinson's truth-telling as he spoke out against discrimination in the north and south, by whites and blacks, and on racial and religious grounds.

Vietnam Week Pledge Card

The Student Mobilization Committee distributed this card as a promise to participate in the Student Week of Protest on April 8th- the 15th against the Vietnam war.

A Perspective for Christian Peace Concern

Brewster Kneen writes about the roles that Christians and the church play in the peace-making process. He cites Saint Peter and Saint Luke to support his argument.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Letter from Ragnar Forbech to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Ragnar Forbech, Chairman of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation (IFOR), responds to a previous letter from Dr. King. Dr. King declined the invitation to speak at the IFOR Conference due to of his busy schedule, but Forbech notes from their earlier correspondence that Dr. King will keep his organization in mind for the future. Forbech also congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Ronald Kessebring to SCLC

Friday, March 30, 1962

Ronald Kessebring sends a contribution along with a letter of support to the SCLC. As a former resident of Atlanta, Mr. Kessebring witnessed what the organization provided for the community and the country at large.

Letter from Roger Dunloff, Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

Due to his inability to contribute financially, Roger G. Dunloff offers his prayers and moral support to Dr. King and the SCLC.

Letter from Charles Sherrod to Friends of SNCC

Saturday, July 22, 1961

Field Secretary Charles Sherrod invites friends of the SNCC to an emergency meeting to outline the direction of the student and Civil Rights Movement. The meeting is to be held at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee which serves as a training ground for nonviolence and civil rights activities.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

Schleiermacher (Christianity)

Dr. King cites a quote by philosopher Schleiermacher regarding "the God-consciousness."

Letter from Edwin Allaire to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

The writer, who identifies himself as a professor at the University of Michigan, encourages Dr. King to announce his candidacy for the Presidency.

Letter from MLK to Emily Barton Anable

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Anable for her kind letter and financial gift. Mrs. King asked him to let her know the money will be used to purchase something for the new baby. At the time of the letter's writing, Dr. and Mrs. King were expecting their fourth child, Bernce.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert Kennedy of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest and expresses his concern for Shuttleworth's safety due to recent threatening activities directed toward nonviolent leaders.

Letter from Louis C. Blount to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966

Louis Blount of the Great Lakes Mutual Life Insurance Company in Michigan encloses a check to the SCLC.

Ferm, Vergilius (ed)

Dr. King cites a book written by Vergilius Ferm that discusses theology in America.

Telegram from Hosea Williams to President Johnson

Tuesday, August 3, 1965

Hosea Williams writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson requesting an investigation of the Andy Whatley murder.

Lawyer Fined $50 in Inquiry Ouster

Saturday, August 20, 1966

New York lawyer, Arthur Kinoy, was carried out of the courtroom by authorities for disorderly conduct. Mr. Kinoy made history as this had never happened before in the legal system.

Lalbahadur Shastri Stamp

This is a authentic postage stamp featuring Lalbahadur Shastri of India.

Letter from Tetsuo Kohmoto to MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965

Tetsuo Kohmoto, president of the Shinkyo Shuppansha Protestant Publishing Company, writes Dr. King regarding the Japanese edition of "Strength to Love." Kuhmoto requests a preface or message for the book and thanks Dr. King in advance for his kindness.

Tillch's Significance

Dr. King records Rhode Island Senator Theodore Greene's opinion that German-American theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich is "the most enlightening and therapeutic theologian of our time."

Letter from Saturday Review Editor Norman Cousins to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Saturday Review editor Norman Cousins writes Dr. King inquiring about a possible meeting with the magazine's editors.

Seventh Biennial Religious Conference

This is a program for the seventh Biennial Religious Conference at Princeton University. Initially conceived shortly after World War II, the conference continues to confront important issues of human life. Under the leadership of the Student Christian Association, "Integration: Conscience in Crisis" will take place over a span of four days. Topics of the conference include "the historical and social as well as the judicial, international, and theological" implications of segregation and integration.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Telegram from Muhammad Ali to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

This message of support from Muhammad Ali was sent to Dr. King during his stay at the County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Debbie Steiner

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. King thanks Miss Steiner for her letter and explains how love is the way to overcome the injustices brought on by prejudice and ignorance. He writes that, though it can be difficult, she must direct her thoughts in a loving way towards those who mistreat her.

Letter from Bernetta Chapman to MLK

Bernetta Chapman writes to Dr. King welcoming him to the Westside of Chicago. Chapman heard the Reverend speak at the Buckingham Foundation stating, "there should be more people like you."