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Athanasius, St.

Dr. King records a short biography of the theologian St. Athanasius, identifying him as the defender of the Nicene faith.

Letter from Ada Krozier to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Ada Krozier encloses a contribution to Dr. King for his work in the civil rights movement and his stance on the Vietnam War. She feels that Dr. King's position is an opportunity to pursue peace and call an end to the war.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Myles Campbell

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King expresses his thanks to Mrs. Myles Campbell for the kind response to his "I Have A Dream" speech during the March on Washington. He explains that prayer is needed for those who are unable to see past their own prejudices and acknowledge everyone as God's children. Dr. King asserts that the federal government is needed to change behaviors in the south and send Mrs. Campbell season's greetings.

Letter from MLK to Mr. J.G. Anoma

Tuesday, January 11, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Anoma for his monetary contribution to the SCLC. In addition, he praises Mr. Anoma for his poem entitled "Black Chicago". The poem addresses the current struggle faced by many "dark-skinned Americans" and reaffirms the aim of the SCLC-Chicago campaign.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Arthur Flemming

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for Mr. Flemming's contribution to the SCLC. He states that because of the contributors continuing support, the initiatives of the SCLC can persist forward.

Letter from MLK to George Carlson

Tuesday, October 2, 1962

Dr. King responds to George Carlson's letter of recent date informing him that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at the Temple. Dr. King states that he would love to speak in Portland, but his schedule does not permit any more engagements.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Friday, September 8, 1961

Vernon R. Byrd, a fellow Boston University graduate, invites Dr. King to Bermuda to be a speaker for Men's Day at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Elmer Evans Advocates for Black Power

Sunday, July 16, 1967

"A white caucasian" advocates for black power, claiming that it is synonymous with sovereign power. Responding to a televised discussion on the subject of black power, Elmer Evans aims to challenge what he felt was inaccurately presented on the show.

Telegram from ABC Network to Ralph David Abernathy

Monday, April 22, 1968

A correspondent from the American Broadcasting Company Network in Washington D.C. contacts Reverend Ralph Abernathy attempting to continue an interview previously scheduled with Dr. King before his death.

Letter from Melvin Brisk to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Melvin Brisk, President of Quadrangle Books, requests that Dr. King read Clarence Darrow's book "Verdicts Out of Court." Brisk acknowledges Dr. King's limited time schedule and urges him to pursue a meeting with Darrow to discuss his publication.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Letter to Congressman Elect Adam C. Powell

This letter from constituent Robert Greene urges Adam C. Powell to reopen his case so that he may be cleared of any wrong doing. Greene states how important Powell is to the Black community and the State of New York. Greene provides information that may assist Powell with his case.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Letter from Arnold Krakower to MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Attorney Arnold Krakower explains to Dr. King the reasons why he must reject a financial appeal to aid the SCLC. According to Krakower, Dr. King's position in the civil rights movement gave him high notoriety. However, once Dr. King turned his attention to oppose the war in Vietnam, Krakower believes he has no choice but to object mixing civil rights and foreign policy.

Statement by MLK on Jailings

Thursday, May 9, 1963

Dr. King states that there have been blatant violations of constitutional principles in the arresting of nonviolent protesters. He further states that those incarcerated have been subject to beatings.

The Urban Coalition

Friday, March 1, 1968

The Urban Coalition's weekly report from the National Coordinator details the newly introduced bill which provides $150 million for summer jobs and anti-poverty programs. The report further discusses the monetary inadequacies for programs involving employment, education, and recreation. A proposal is established by the Office of Economic Opportunity to adhere to the summer programs.

Marcian

Dr. King highlights biographical information on Marcian, a second-century reformer.

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

Letter from William Eerdmans, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1963

William. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company requests to reprint Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" in a small booklet for wider circulation. Eerdmans, Jr. writes, "your words...are those of a Christian martyr and saint."

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.

SCLC President's Report - MLK

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

Delivered at the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King presents the annual report for the organization. King addresses several elements of the Civil Rights Movement as he discusses the successes, plans, goals, and vision of the SCLC in relation to the wider movement it represents.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher on Method

Dr. King sketches his view of methodologies employed by German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from Gus C. Zucco to MLK

Friday, October 12, 1962

Gus Zucco writes Dr. King regarding the changes of his schedule in hopes that he will be able to speak in Pennsylvania.

SCLC Press Release: Civil Rights Leader Protests Antipoverty Cutbacks

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a press release containing a telegram that Reverend Ralph David Abernathy sent to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Abernathy expresses his concern with President Johnson's proposed cuts to the Office of Economic Opportunity's funding.

Social Ethics

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 3:15 while taking notes about social ethics. The passage that he quotes says that those who oppress others are sinning against God.

Bread at Midnight

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Letter from Maddy Tolud to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Maddy Tolud, the President of A. R. K., thanks Dr. King for being an honorary member of their organization. Tolud assures him that their members will actively work towards equality until justice prevails.

SCLC Northern City Tour

SCLC provides an organizational manual that outlines details regarding their Northern city tour. They are traveling to cities in the northern United States in order to assess social conditions and build relationships amongst civil rights leadership. The manual also provides tour dates and suggestions for organizing the tour.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Lilace Reid Barnes

Monday, May 23, 1966

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the contribution made by Lilace Barnnes to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King states that without the contributions from supporters the initiatives of the SCLC would not be possible.