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Letter from Sandra Greenia to MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963

Sandra Greenia requests that Dr. King send her some information regarding integration. She emphasizes that she gained a lot by living in various integrated U.S. Naval Bases.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to the first chapter of the Old Testament book, Nahum.

Letter from Joseph Looney to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966

Joseph Looney writes Dr. King inviting him to visit American College in Louvain, Belgium. Looney suggests the Reverend lead a discussion regarding the developments in the Civil Rights struggle and his role in it. Looney closes by praying that God will bless Dr. King and his family.

Today's Hero - The Negro Child

The "Southern Patriot" newsletter of the Southern Conference Educational Fund published this advertisement featuring the photo of two small children. The advertisement includes a heartfelt thank you to those many Negro students (trailblazers) brave enough to endure racial harassment and physical danger in the struggle to integrate schools in the South.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Susan Stauffer

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Susan Stauffer for her contribution to the SCLC. He states, "such moral and financial support are of inestimable value for the continuance of our humble efforts."

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to lunch after the Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting.

Minutes of National Action Council Meeting

Sunday, July 1, 1962

The National Action Council, a sector of the Congress of Racial Equality, hosts a regional meeting in Miami, Florida where they will vote on council member positions, as well as regional and national NAC meeting logistics.

Letter from MLK to Corine Jenkins About Prayer

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King replies to Corine Jenkins regarding her missing daughter. He informs her that she and her daughter are in his prayers.

Appreciation Letter to MLK

Wednesday, August 21, 1963

President John F. Kennedy writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his support during this difficult time. President Kennedy is referring to the death of his second son, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, who died two days after his birth August 7, 1963.

Existentialism

Dr. King explains the philosophy of existentialism.

Statement Issued from Harlem Hospital by MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the staff at Harlem Hospital and those who supported him during his stay at this location. He asserts that the telegrams, letters, calls and other means of contact have been accepted as a token of respect.

Letter from Joseph L. Kapica to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Joseph Kapica, a freelance writer from Connecticut, requests special commentary from Dr. King regarding the issue of interracial adoption. Kapica writes about interracial adoption based on findings from the Child Welfare League of America.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, writes Dr. King to invite him to a meeting with members of the British Parliament to discuss the developing racial crisis in their country. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Baruch Spinoza's "Epistle 21" to Henry Oldenburg.

Urban Strategy Conference and Demonstration Participants

This document lists attendees of the Urban Strategy Conference who also went to a demonstration in Washington, D. C.

Letter from Mr. Jonathan B. Weisbuch to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

Mr. Weisbuch offers a monetary donation to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He praises Dr. King for his continued efforts in reforming the South and the entire country.

Letter from MLK to Mary M. Drummond

Thursday, July 18, 1963

Dr. King thanks Ms. Drummond for her supportive correspondence regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail." He states that the opportunity to fight racial injustice is a "rare privilege" and regards his open letter as an attempt to examine racial inequity under the lens of Christian ethics.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1962

Sarah Harvey states that the receipt of Dr. King's letter and book made her feel "very unworthy." Mrs. Harvey also makes financial a contribution.

Letter from MLK to C. Anderson Davis

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King replies to Reverend Davis' invitation to speak at the West Virginia Emancipation Proclamation Committee event in Bluefield, West Virginia. Dr. King declines the invitation citing his he has already accepted the maximum number of speaking engagements for the next ten to twelve months. Dr. King does extend his appreciation for the Committee's moral and financial support of the work done by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Wednesday, July 8, 1964

In this letter Senator Hubert Humphrey urges Dr. King to accept an invitation to speak at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.

Letter from Rev. Sterling E. Glover and Rev. Henry Payden to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967

Reverend Glover informs Dr. King that he was surprised to hear that a statement was released regarding the planned summer conference. It was Reverend Glover's impression that no information would be released to the press, so that relations between the United Pastors Association and the SCLC would not be tainted.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Letter from A. Bohdan to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

A. Bohdan, catering manager of Sydney, Australia's Chevron Hotel, writes Dr. King in request of his favorite meal to include on a special menu featuring dishes of other "famous personalities in Politics, Industry, and Art."

Outline for The Secret of Adjustment

In this sermon, Dr. King notes applicable methods used to deal with the tensions in life. It is said that "the secret to adjustment is to find contentment." King further references the experience of the Apostle Paul and what he learned in confronting this problem.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King notes Herbert Spencer’s definition of religion.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

Senator Edward Kennedy's Address to SCLC

Monday, August 8, 1966

Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-MA) addresses the 1966 SCLC Annual Convention, stating that the sit-ins, freedom rides and Montgomery bus boycott created a movement that brought about the most important change of the last 20 years. He says that while the caste system in politics is over, the life of the average Negro hasn’t changed much. Society is becoming divided rich and poor, black and white, and a massive commitment of national resources must be made to upgrade Negro life in America.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, October 29, 1965

Dr. Mays writes to Dr. King regarding the new statement of purpose for Morehouse College.