Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"POLAND"

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker, executive assistant to Dr. King writes a response letter to Eugene Cook, the Attorney General of Georgia. Walker asks the Attorney General to provide his office with a list of questions that he would like answered. He also informs Cook that he will release the contents of this letter to the news media to make sure their is a level of transparency.

The Cultural Crisis

Dr. King quotes Edward Hallett Carr's "Conditions of Peace."

Press Release - MLK Mass Meeting

Sunday, August 21, 1960

This document is a 1960 press release detailing a voter's rally at the Jefferson County Armory in Kentucky where Dr. King will be the principle speaker.

Political Cartoon: Nourishing the Enemy

Thursday, April 20, 1967

This political cartoon satirizes various elements of antiwar protesters regarding Vietnam. The inference is that events and positions originating from those elements are in essence aid and comfort to the enemy. "King Speeches" is prominently displayed.

Schleiermacher, Friedrich

Dr. King outlines the life and ideologies of Friedrich Schleiermacher.

Statement on Penance for Violence in Albany, Georgia

Monday, July 30, 1962

Dr. King calls for a day of penance that will serve as a tactic of the self-purification step of the nonviolence method. Dr. King urges for the City Commission to talk with leaders of the Albany Movement.

Flyer for Confront the Warmakers at the Pentagon

This flyer from the Southern California Mobilization Committee advertises a public meeting. At the meeting, the committee plans to provide comprehensive reports from Washington and display a slide show of recent demonstrations. In addition, they plan to discuss future SCMC activities.

Don B. Pratt's Position Statement

Friday, January 26, 1968

Don Pratt expresses concerns about his induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War. Mr. Pratt questions the morality of this "aggressive" war, which would enable him to inflict violence against his "neighbors" of Vietnam.

Letter from Jim E. Hansen to MLK Regarding Support for Presidency

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

Jim Hansen, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68, a Time-Life sponsored national presidential primary at the College of Southern Utah, wrote to MLK in support of Dr. King as a presidential candidate. He requested materials for the April 1968 event which took place on the college's campus.

Letter from James E. Davis to MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1966

Rev. James A. Davis requests the assistance of Dr. King in his graduate studies focusing on pastoral care and race relations. Davis was recently appointed as the assistant pastor of the Carroll Street Methodist Church in Nashville and expresses distaste with the fact that there are no Negroes members in the congregation. Davis wishes for the Carroll Street Methodist Church to become more inclusive.

Letter from Jo Ellen Braveman to MLK

Jo Ellen Braveman, Secretary of the Human Relations Club of Julia Richman High School, presents Dr. King with the Julia Richman Brotherhood Award. Braveman says, "You truly deserve this award because of your dedicated outstanding work in Human Relations."

Telegram from Rev. M Moran Weston Rector to MLK

Rev. Rector writes to Dr. King extending his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign. He also invites Dr. King to speak at their church to rally support for the campaign.

Peter Lombard

Dr. King outlines biographical information regarding theologian Peter Lombard.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Letter from MLK to Nelson Rockefeller

Wednesday, August 22, 1962

Dr. King takes the opportunity to thank New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller for his tremendous contribution to SCLC. He expresses that the struggle couldn't have survived without friends like Gov. Rockefeller and looks forward to their September 7, 1962 meeting.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

Letter from LeRoy Collins of the U.S. Department of Commerce

The Director of Communtiy Relations Service for the U.S. Department of Commerce, LeRoy Collins, offers their partnership and support to the National Assembly on Progress in Eaquality of Opportunity in Housing and the National College Student Conference on Freedom of Residence. Each conference addresses the issue of discrimination; inequalitiesof residence and citizenship at the community level.

Address to the Montgomery Improvement Association

Monday, December 5, 1955

Dr. King discusses the inequality in America and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He says that he will work to eliminate discrimination in Montgomery and he encourages the audience to participate and actively seek change as well.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Letter from Robert McDougal, Jr. to MLK Regarding a Donation Appeal

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

In this letter, McDougal acknowledges Dr. King's appeal of October 1965, however states that he is concentrating his donations on other organizations. On the letter there are handwritten comments regarding Dr. King's response.

MLK to the Second Precinct Clergymen's Association

Thursday, March 26, 1964

Dr. King gives a statement to the Second Precinct Clergymen's Association in Washington, D. C. regarding voter registration and the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts, "I understand that voter registration here has reached a mark just short of 170,000."

Note to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964

In a brief note, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of an enclosed British publisher's catalogue for his review.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Abraham Ribicoff thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and expresses his contentment with the passing of the Civil Rights Bill. Ribicoff hopes for the progression of the nation in providing equal opportunities for all.

King Assails Westmoreland, Praises Clay

This article discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King asserts that the US is on the wrong side of the war and denounces it during a speech at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

The Plain Dealer: Dr. King Here Today to Gauge Tensions

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

This article, printed in "The Plain Dealer," provides a brief history of Dr. King and details the plans he had for Cleveland, OH.

Letter from British High School Student to MLK

Margaret Blenkins, a fifteen year old student from Northumberland, England, writes Dr. King to ask how she can join the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joan Daves to Howard Gotlieb

Monday, May 15, 1967

Joan Daves responds to Mr. Gotlieb regarding a request to write Dr. King's biography from archival material in the possession of Boston University. At the present time and for various reasons, Dr. King has decided not to approve this project.

Letter from Mr. Peter Feldman to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

In this letter Peter Feldman, the production manager for WRVR Radio in New York City, requests an interview with Dr. King the day of his sermon at Riverside Church. WRVR feels the interview would be a "significant platform" for his upcoming march on Washington. Dr. King would be assassinated less than a month later.

Press Release: MLK Demands US Action Against Killers of Negroes in Orangeburg, S.C.

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Dr. King's telegram to United States Attorney General Ramsey Carlk was reprinted in this press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In it, Dr. King urges the Justice department to take proper legal action against the perpetrators of violence against Negroes following the wounding and killing of 37 to 50 students in Orangeburg, South Carolina.

Speech to the Synagogue Council of America

Sunday, December 5, 1965

Dr. King receives the Judaism and World Peace Award from the Synagogue Council of America and uses the occasion to speak about the Civil Rights Movement and international peace. He laments the vehement criticism of dissent and discussion of the Vietnam War and enumerates reasons why the Hebrew prophets are so needed today.