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Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

Letter from Marguerite Munson to MLK

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

Mrs.Munson writes Dr.King to ask for his assistance in finding a lawyer that is not corrupted by the government.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Gunnar Jahn

Monday, September 11, 1967

Dr. King authorizes Philip Noel-Baker and Pater George Dominique Pire to represent him in a delegation seeking Vietnam peace negotiations.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Frederick B. Hewitt to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

Rev. Frederick Hewitt of Grace United Church writes Dr. King inviting him to visit the Thousand Islands for a combination of preaching with summer vacation.

Letter from William Woodall to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Mr. Woodall relays instructions from God concerning Dr. King's next march.

Letter from Julia Smith to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1962

Julia Smith asks Dr. King to pray for her because she wants to study nursing at Michigan State University, a predominately white school at the time. She also reminds Dr. King of their previous encounter in St. Louis, Missouri where she shook his hand.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Letter from Benjamin E. Smith to MLK

Monday, May 7, 1962

This report highlights a Birmingham conference on the "Ways and Means to Integrate the Deep South" sponsored by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. This conference included several hundred white and black leaders who sought to integrate the South.

Letter from Elliot J. Groszek to MLK

Elliot Groszek sends his support to Dr. King after hearing his speech in which he proposed that President Johnson sponsor a program for employment. Groszek finds King to be a revo-lutionary leader and would like for him to run for President of the United States.

Letter from MLK to Emily Barton Anable

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Anable for her kind letter and financial gift. Mrs. King asked him to let her know the money will be used to purchase something for the new baby. At the time of the letter's writing, Dr. and Mrs. King were expecting their fourth child, Bernce.

Request from Wm. James Stuart to MLK

Monday, June 14, 1965

Wm. James Stuart, a student, seeks the recommendation of books that helped Dr. King develop his own way of preaching.

Letter from Adam C. Powell to Wyatt Tee Walker

Reverend Adam Clayton Powell copies to MLK a letter informing Wyatt Walker that his preaching duties at Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem are being terminated because of budget constraints.

The Church

Dr. King writes a note on the Church, calling it the "center of hope."

Letter from Elaine Haley to Senator George Murphy

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

Elaine Haley sends a letter to Senator George Murphy discussing Dr. King's views on riots in relation to ending the Vietnam War.


Dr. King summarizes and quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's view of sin in Christian Faith.

Letter from Ethel Sebastian to MLK

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Mrs. Ethel Sebastian requests that Dr. King assists in the search of her father, whom she has never met. Mrs. Sebastian provides facts and details to better aid Dr. King's pursuit of locating her father. She also mentions her cousin, a Reverend, who is a member of Friendship Baptist Church. Mrs. Sebastian is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and sends her blessings in hope that he can locate her family relatives.

Letter from Samuel Starr to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

Mr. Starr shares his thoughts regarding the "negro people," suggesting they go back to Africa and organize civilization under Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from Rosemary O'Neill to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Rosemary O'Neill of the College of Saint Rose in Albany, New York writes Dr. King regarding Choice '68, the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. O'Neill, Choice '68 Campus Coordinator, requests campaign materials such as fliers, pamphlets and fact sheets to inform students on various candidates.

Letter from Louis Lurie to Dizzy Gllespie

Monday, October 14, 1963

San Francisco philanthropist and real estate developer Louis Lurie forwards a donation for the SCLC to famous trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. Gillespie often performed at fundraising concerts for the SCLC.

What Do You Believe About Fair Housing?

This brochure was provided to the public to dispell the myths and solidify the facts of the fair housing market.

Letter from Marvin T. Robinson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967

Reverend Marvin T. Robinson, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, requests that Dr. King submit a written statement on personal stationary for the Souvenir Journal, a Seventy-Fifth Anniversary release issued by the Friendship Baptist Church.

Letter from Merle B. Foreman to MLK

Tuesday, October 11, 1966

Merle B. Foreman is writing to Dr. King in hopes of receiving an autograph. She also encloses a self addressed stamped envelope.

Letter from United States Congress to MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Joseph McDade writes Dr. King to solicit his views regarding the affects of organized crime on the plight of the urban poor.

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Monday, August 22, 1966

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

The Many Faces of Black Power

The author identifies several approaches to the notion of Black Power. The author concludes that Black Power is "a programmatic concept capable of objective definition", "it presents many difficulties", and that the negatives have outweighed the positives.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Commencement Ceremony at Boston University

This photograph shows a commencement ceremony at Boston University in June of 1959.

Science and Religion

Dr. King documents a quote regarding science and religion from "The Finding of God."

SCLC Staff Assignments

This document contains a list of specific assignments for the individuals of the SCLC staff.