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Letter from MLK to Daniel Goodwin

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's request for Mr. Daniel Goodwin to participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms.

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Oklahoma (OK), New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK

Tuesday, July 5, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King that he has filed a case in Mississippi "requesting the court to require law enforcement officials to protect civil rights workers and other citizens."

Letter from MLK to Miss Read

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Miss Read's "interest in and support of our work and the American Negroes [sic] struggle for freedom and dignity."

Letter from Kenneth Ives to MLK

Monday, August 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Kenneth Ives writes a letter and encloses his research that could be beneficial to Dr. King. Ives studied the effects of various social policy efforts on individuals and on society in general.

Observer: The Fiery Savior

Kentucky (KY), VIETNAM

Journalist Ponchitta Pierce sends Dr. King an article that details the press conference of "The Militant." In response to questioning, the individual expresses their discontent with liberal politics, the United States of America, and its presence in Vietnam.

January Program of the Emancipation Celebration

Monday, January 2, 1961
Georgia (GA)

This program of the Emancipation Celebration in Savannah, Georgia features Dr. King as the guest speaker.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."

Letter from Water L. Hoston to SCLC

Saturday, October 28, 1967
New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, Washington, D.C.

Walter Hoston, of American Bridge Association, sends his company's contribution to the SCLC in support of their work for justice and equality.

Letter from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967
ISRAEL

Teddy Kollek, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Israel, expresses appreciation and support for Dr. King's planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. At the time of this letter, West Jerusalem was Israeli territory and East Jerusalem part of Jordan. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

Outline for Why Does History Move?

Dr. King's sermon outline references Hegel and Marx in relation to questions surrounding the concept of history.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, Memphis, TN, WESTERN SAHARA, Tennessee (TN), South Africa

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Press Release on School Integration of Taliaferro County, Georgia

Thursday, October 14, 1965
Georgia (GA)

This press release by Dr. King commends the decision of the three-judge panel on the decision of school integration.

SCLC Annual Financial Report

Atlanta, GA

Ralph David Abernathy, SCLC Financial Secretary and Treasurer, submitted this Annual Financial Report for the fiscal year 1963-1964. The report also includes the estimated budget for 1964-1965.

Letter from Cornell E. Talley to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Pennsylvania (PA), Pittsburgh, PA

Cornell E. Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, tells Dr. King that his church is withdrawing their pledge of $100 per month to the SCLC. Talley felt as if Dr. King was no longer fighting for civil rights, and that his leadership of anti-war demonstrations was counterproductive.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
FRANCE, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dr. King receives a telegram from Duncan Wood in Geneva, Switzerland concerning upcoming international trips.

Invitation to SCLF Celebration from MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King sent this telegram to 30 prominent members of the Philedelphia community, inviting them to join the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation in presenting the Star for Freedom to Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, and Signey Poitier.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Miss Enid Baird

Florida (FL)

Dora McDonald sends word via telegram to Enid C. Baird informing her of an unforeseen emergency that prevents her attendance at the Urban League Convention.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
New York (NY)

Governor Nelson Rockefeller writes Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?".

Telegram to MLK from Harold E. Fey with The Christian Century

Tuesday, March 6, 1956
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Harold Fey empathizes with Dr. King and his struggle in the fight against injustice. He offers words of encouragement and to continue the ongoing battle.

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Flyer

This flyer from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which includes a quotation from Dr. King, encourages membership in the organization.

Letter from Milton S. Eisenhower to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966
New York, NY

This letter from former President Eisenhower's brother Milton, on behalf of Planned Parenthood World Population, requests that Dr. King serve the organization in order to "lend important moral support."

Peter Denied His Lord, And Cryed

Sam Bradley, from Friends Journal, composes a poem illustrating Saint Peter's denial of Jesus.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Ross D. Davis

Friday, December 3, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak to the Woman's National Democratic Club in Washington, D.C. He explains that he has an engagement in a different part of the country on the same date.

Ebenezer Project Bill

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Citizens Trust Company reminds the SCLC of an upcoming payment related to the "Ebenezer Project."

Letter from US Attorney General Robert Kennedy Forwarded to MLK

Friday, May 8, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

John L. Murphy writes Dr. King to forward him a letter for the Reverend from US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that his office received in error. In the forwarded letter, Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his willingness to contribute to a series of oral interviews for the John F. Kennedy library.

Letter from Edna R. McKinnon to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967
California (CA)

Edna McKinnon praises Dr. King for his wonderful work with the SCLC and its effect on the "entire world." She agrees with Dr. King's nonviolent philosophy and approach to American military intervention in Vietnam. Ms. McKinnon is the sister of Jeanette Rankin, the first woman of Congress, and the only member to vote against U.S. entry into both world wars.

Letter from the Secretary General of the Oversees Vietnamese Buddhist Association

Saturday, April 29, 1967
FRANCE, VIETNAM

In this correspondence VO VAN AI request assistance in denouncing the massacre at the School of Youth For Social Services in Vietnam.