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Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

Knudson, Albert

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of Redemption."

International Vacation Courses

Friday, November 22, 1963

Miss Margaret Scattergood invites Dr. King to Denmark to address the issues of the struggle in the United States to give the Negro full partnership in American society.

Statements on Jobs and Poverty

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King explains the relationship between violence and the lack of employment among young people. Dr. King also speaks of the Thanksgiving Fast for Freedom and its efforts to end poverty and hunger.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Letter from MLK to Evert Svensson

Friday, May 29, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the Nobel Peace Prize Award nomination, but informs Evert Svensson that there are some roadblocks affecting his acceptance. The race problem in America requires his time, energy and presence in order to prevent the offset of violence. Dr. King inquires if the proposed date for the event could be altered.

Letter from Robert Needles to MLK

Thursday, June 17, 1965

A critic writes to Dr. King to explain why he will not support his program. He insists that Dr. King's activity only contributes to the "deterioration of the colored people in America."

The Leaguers, Inc. Ceremony Program

Thursday, May 2, 1963

This program details the "Ground Breaking Ceremony" of The Leaguers, a Head Start program out of Newark, New Jersey. This organization has continuously provided community services geared towards children and family development. It is also the oldest incorporated African-American non-profit in the state.

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy by MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Dr. King introduces the SCLC's guest speaker, Senator Edward Kennedy at a conference in Jackson, Mississippi.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK

Thursday, November 17, 1966

Mr. Sandperl writes to Dr. King regarding the direction of the SCLC. He suggest that the SCLC continue to represent social change and uphold the principles of nonviolence. However, in order to succeed, Mr. Sandperl believes that it should be done from a universal view, instead of from a Negro perspective.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Shaefer requests that Dora McDonald send two mats and a second biographical sketch of Dr. King for use in two local papers to promote Dr. King's upcoming appearance in Pennsylvania to speak for the Hadley Memorial Fund. He also asks that Dr. King's lecture topic be sent so it may be added to the program for the speech.

Letter from J. D. Williams to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966

Professor Williams requests a phone interview with Dr. King concerning the studies of a select group of Honors students at the University of Utah.

Letter from MLK to Kathy Sasso

Monday, April 27, 1964

Dr. King shares his pleasure in being named "Person of the Week" by Miss Sasso's class. He encloses a copy of one of his speeches.

Letter from David A. Gill

Tuesday, September 5, 1967

Mr. Gill requests a photograph of Dr. King for classroom display.

Letter from MLK Regarding Atlanta University Center

Dr. King writes to a woman concerning what he calls "the best Negro colleges in the South." He discusses the Atlanta University Center, which consists of Spelman College, Morehouse College, Clark University and Morris Brown College.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Monday, August 30, 1965

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

Letter from Kathy Sasso to MLK

Kathy Sasso, a student at Public School 30 in Staten Island, New York, notifies Dr. King that her class read his "I Have a Dream" speech and named him "Person of the Week." Sasso also requests a copy of one of Dr. King's speeches.

Letter from William M. Kunstler to MLK Regarding a Guest Appearance

Friday, September 7, 1962

Here William M. Kunstler (Bill) makes two separate requests: first that Dr. King appear on the Barry Gray radio program for an interview, and, second, to receive a brief tape from the reverend for an NAACP housing rally at the Rye-Port Chester Chapter.

Existentialism

Dr. King outlines concepts of existentialism as viewed through the doctrine of French existentialist writer Jean Paul Sartre.

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

Letter from Florence of Scepter Records, Inc. to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

In this letter, Florence thanks Dr. King for his address at the NATRA Convention. She also encloses a contribution to continue the work of the movement.

Statistics on Birmingham, Alabama

This sheet shows Negro vs. White Populations in Birmingham, Alabama in regards to voting. It also shows the working wages of the Negro Population according to an article in the Saturday Evening Post.

MLK Urges the Vice President to Visit the South

Thursday, June 13, 1957

Dr. King informs the press that he is articulating plans with the SCLC to launch a campaign to prepare the Negro community for the 1958 election. Dr. King appeals to Vice President Richard Nixon to perform three duties to aid the practice of justice and freedom in the United States. The first of the three involves personal appearances of Nixon to speak to the people of the South about civil rights. The second duty asserts Nixon's initiation of the United States Constitution to support the Negro's voting rights.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King writes notes regarding Danish philosopher and theologian Doren Kierkegaard's views on ethics and religion.

Letter from Artist Sidney Gordon Budnick to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Sidney Gordon Budnick, architect and artist, gifts Dr. King with a piece of art work and applauds Dr. King's "efforts to bring to life the brotherhood of God and of man."

Publicity Plans for Pilgrimage Tour

This document describes a request for Dr. King to become involved with the Pilgrimage Tour in New York.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964

Senator Joseph S. Clark informs Dr. King of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's support.

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."