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Inter-Office Telephone Extensions

Documented are the telephone extensions for the SCLC office staff.

Schleiermacher (Elements of Pantheism)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion” and writes that it reminds him of Spinoza’s intellectual love of God. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King responds to Ms. Young's previous letter that discussed the difficulty of engaging people in voter registration efforts.

Letter from MLK to David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King thanks David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union for their thoughtful donation to SCLC. The contribution will be used to assist the SCLC in voter registration, direct action and other methods to combat racial injustice.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966
New York (NY)

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Ralph Bunche inquires if Dr. King and his wife will be available for lunch and dinner with himself and members of the United Nations before leaving for Oslo.

Letter from Patterson Charles Jr. to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Georgia (GA)

Patterson Charles, Jr. writes Dora McDonald asking for Dr. King's help regarding alleged racial discrimination in a legal matter.

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Monica Wilson

Saturday, April 3, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Dora McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, responds to Monica Wilson at the University of Cape Town in acceptance of her invitation to speak at the institution. McDonald closes requesting confirmation of a date for Dr. King, as well as accommodation information.

Letter from Alan J. Rankin to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, January 23, 1967
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King informs Alan J. Rankin to communicate to Dora McDonald about his availability to speak at the University Christian Council of McMaster University. The theme of the discussion for the "Teach-In" is going to be "The Religious Dilemma of Twentieth Century Man." Mr. Rankin expects over 2,000 students in attendance and church people from Canada. Furthermore, Mr. Rankin asserts that there will be news coverage on this event.

Letter from Mrs. E. A. Johnson to Mrs. Cotton

Saturday, March 31, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

A young male civil rights activist and participant in demonstrations experienced police brutality after he was targeted for his involvement in the Monroe Race Riot story. E. A. Johnson provides Mrs. Cotton with the legal details of the case surrounding the young man.

Letter from Lance Redford to Mrs. King

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Lance Redford, a student in New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King.

Chicago - Striving Toward Progress

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

The author of this article identifies two leaders, to include Dr. King and Joseph Germano, in the civil rights movement to speak on the new political focus on economic disparities.

The Secular in Relation to the Holy

Dr. King quotes theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology." Dr. King's doctoral degree is in systematic theology from Boston University and his dissertation is on Paul Tillich. According to Tillich, secular and holy correlate and cannot act separately. Tillich states, "The holy embraces itself and the secular."

Metaphysics

Dr. King notes William James' view of metaphysics.

Letter from R. Abraham to MLK

Saturday, September 20, 1958
New York, NY

R. Abraham sends this get-well letter to Dr. King wishing a full recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital. Also enclosed is a gift in appreciation for Dr. King's work for humanity.

Reason

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "The Finding of God."

SCLC Voter Registration Agenda

This document captures the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's voter registration agenda in Detroit, Michigan between August 18 and August 23, 1967.

Letter from the Knox's Church to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The Knox's Church of Canada expresses their excitement to see Dr. King's image in Time Magazine for 'Man of the Year.' The author asserts that after all John F. Kennedy may have not died "in vain." Robert A. Jackson expounds on the societal issues in Canada and how they experience some aspects of segregation in cities. Mr. Jackson invites Dr. King to the Knox church upon his availability.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Christianity

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Martin Luther's views on Christianity, accroding to the book, "Concerning Christian Liberty."

Black Power

This flyer gives a description of what black power entails.

Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Prayer by Dean L. Harold DeWolf at Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, June 26, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is a prayer by Dr. King's doctoral advisor, Dean L. Harold DeWold of Wesley Theological Seminary, given at the Civil Rights Rally on the Capitol grounds in Jackson, Mississippi.

Letter from Frieda E. Isenberg to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962
New York (NY)

Frieda Isenberg collected money from various friends and co-workers to support the cause of freedom in the South. The total contribution given was $22.00.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lamb Toledo to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, Mr. and Mrs. Toledo offer support to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy, A.D. King, and Wyatt Walker.

International Convention of Christian Churches Session Schedule

Wednesday, September 14, 1966
Texas (TX), Indiana (IN), Missouri (MO), Detroit, MI, Dallas, TX

This program for the International Convention of Christian Churches provides an itinerary for a one-day session taking place in Dallas, Texas. A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary, sends this final letter to coordinate all aspects and help guide participants. Dr. King is listed on the schedule as a guest speaker and intends to deliver an address entitled "Beyond Discovery Love."

Invitation from Saint Vincent College to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Ralph J. Hils Jr., Director of Assemblies, invites Dr. King to address the student body at St. Vincent's College. He shares a local encounter with discrimination against their American and African Negro students. Mr. Hils outlines the history of the college and provides the names of other prominent visitors of the campus.

Letter from Paul D. Metzger to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964
Philadelphia, PA

Paul D. Metzger, President of the Student Association at Central High School, writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at a forum concerning the issues of civil rights in America. Dr. King's response to this invitation is enclosed at the culmination of the letter.

Letter from James Lynwood Walker to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
Berkeley, CA

James Lynwood Walker writes Dr. King about Muhammed Ali's refusal to join the army.

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.