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Invitation from President Kennedy to MLK

Washington, D.C.

The President of the United States invites Dr. King to attend a luncheon at the White House.

Letter from Rev. Camilo A. Boasso to MLK

Wednesday, December 30, 1964
New Jersey (NJ), ARGENTINA

In this document, a Catholic priest from Argentina writes to Dr. King and congratulates him for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The priest also inquires about obtaining permission to translate into Spanish Dr. King's recent book "Why We Cant Wait." Requests like this increased significantly as Dr. King's prominence grew.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Exodus in reference to "the idea of a primitive anthropomorphic God."

Handwritten Draft Letter from MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the generous contribution made by Mr. Hunter and addresses questions that were asked in a previous letter.

The True Nature of Religion

Dr. King discusses the true nature of religion as both an inward and outward experience. The subject "He" is unidentified.

Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, November 12, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Monica Wilson invites Dr. King to deliver the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town. She explains that they do not have a large budget but are willing to pay for travel and hotel expenses.

Letter from William M. Kunstler to MLK Regarding a Guest Appearance

Friday, September 7, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Massachusetts (MA), Connecticut (CT)

Here William M. Kunstler (Bill) makes two separate requests: first that Dr. King appear on the Barry Gray radio program for an interview, and, second, to receive a brief tape from the reverend for an NAACP housing rally at the Rye-Port Chester Chapter.

Letter from W. C. Akers to MLK

Missouri (MO)

W. C. Akers expresses his concern about Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Margie Edmondson to MLK Regaring a Speaking Engagement

Thursday, February 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Margie Edmondson of Chicago, Illinois invites Dr. King to speak to local youth at a bi-monthly meeting of the Junior Christian Inter-Racial Commission.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Maryland (MD)

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Harvey Weeks to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967
California (CA), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, Montgomery, AL

Harvey Weeks writes to Dr. King to show his support for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. He also offers some advice and makes an appeal.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

The Student Protest Movement Special Report

Thursday, February 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Norfolk, VA, Tennessee (TN), Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Kansas (KS), Oklahoma (OK), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Regional Council outlines several facts regarding the Student Protest Movement leading up to February 25, 1960. The contents of this report include detailed examples, legal precedents and public reaction accounts. Also included, is an analysis of the conditions that caused the student protest movement, as well as ideas for solutions.

Thank You Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays former president of Morehouse College thanks Dr. King for his Founders' Day contribution.

Comment On Proposed Resolution: Ending Racism in the Democratic Party

Friday, October 9, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Texas (TX), New Jersey (NJ)

On October 9th, 1964, the Democratic National Convention adopted a resolution ending racial discrimination in Party membership.

Letter to MLK from Ray Cerreta

New York (NY)

Mr. Ray Cerreta, of Jackson Heights, New York, requests an autograph from Dr. King for his personal collection.

Letter from Prime Minister Hugh Shearer to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967
JAMAICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, newly appointed Jamaican Prime Minister Hugh Shearer thanks Dr. King for his "kind congratulations." Shearer goes on to ask for prayers of success on behalf of Jamaica and its people.

Letter from The Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN

The Executive Committee of The Martin Luther King Fund in Sweden commends Dr. King's non-violent approach to the fight for civil rights in America. They also present Dr. King with a monetary donation raised from an earlier performance featuring Dr. King and Harry Belafonte at the Royal Opera House in Stockholm.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

Atlanta, GA

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Berl Bernhard

Wednesday, February 6, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Berl Bernhard that Dr. King has a prior engagement out of the country and cannot attend the civil rights planning conference. McDonald states, "He asked me to say to you that he would be grateful if you would send him a copy of the report of the conference."

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Mr. Rustin informs Dr. King that he has reached out to the American Jewish Committee and has included the appropriate person to recognize prior to the delivery of his speech.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King's stance on the American economy and the current status of the Negro.

Letter from Dr. Helen Curth to the MLK Memorial Fund

Thursday, April 11, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. Curth encloses a donation for the Martin Luther King Memorial Fund. She requests that a receipt for $5 be sent to each of her two grandsons so that they may feel connected to Dr. King's memory.

MLK Examination Blue Book

Friday, May 23, 1947

Dr. King used this "Blue Book" to record answers for a Bible exam taken on May 23, 1947.

Letter from Mahalia Jackson Foundation Requesting Financial Support

Illinois (IL)

In this letter addressed to "Friend," gospel singer Mahalia Jackson requests financial support for the Mahalia Jackson Foundation, which helps deserving children obtain a higher education.

MLK's Sermon Notes

Dr. King composed these notes in preparation for a sermon. The themes include faith, man's dealing with crisis, and "God's Search for Man."

Unsigned Letter of Support

Monday, December 25, 1967

The following document is a letter of support and encouragement written to Dr. King, the President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Roy T. Poorman to Philadelphia Tribune Editor

Monday, July 12, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, GERMANY

Roy T. Poorman writes the editor of the Philadelphia Tribune regarding an article by Morris I. Liebman that opposed "negro civil rights protest demonstrations." Poorman identifies Liebman as a person of Jewish descent and compares the techniques of Dr. King to Biblical leader Moses. Poorman also discusses the lack of action by Jews in America or Germany prior to the genocide of 6,000,000 Jews along with the recent discrimination of the Jewish people in other countries. He writes in support of Dr. King's approach.

Letter from Kenneth Bells to Floyd McKissick

Friday, September 16, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Kenneth Bells requests to be removed from the Congress of Racial Equality's list of potential contributors due to CORE's support of the Black Power Movement.