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Teacher's Manual: Civil Disobedience, Morality, and the Coming of the Civil War

Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA), Illinois (IL)

Muriel Moulton of Chicago, Illinois provides a course manual for teaching civil disobedience and morality leading up to the American Civil War. Moulton does not assign a value to the morality of civil disobedience, but only poses the question while providing primary sources for interpretation.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Letter from MLK to Irene Shunfenthal

New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King thanks Irene Shunfenthal for her support. He says that those who seek peace through nonviolence must use every creative means of protest available to achieve U.S. disengagement from Vietnam, and must also urge that nonviolence be adopted internationally to settle disputes among nations.

Letter from Norman Thomas to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Norman Thomas offers his congratulations to Dr. King for being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Thomas also feels the need to thank the Nobel Committee for recognizing Dr. King's leadership in being the one to receive the coveted award.

Letter from Joan Daves to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves expresses her gratitude toward Mrs. King for her support of her husband throughout his work in the Civil Rights Movement, following his receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

W. David Angus extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the members of the Canadian Club of Montreal about the Civil Rights Movement.


Dr. King quotes Plato's views regarding God.

Handwritten Notecard regarding "Rule of Faith"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the "Rule of Faith." This is an example of the many notecards Dr.King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to S. P. Belcher

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King express gratitude for the receipt of financial support during an event at the Palasis des Sports. In addition, Dr. King highlights the importance of the demonstration for international concerns of the French and American communities in Paris.

Invitation to Ghana's Independence Celebration


Dr. and Mrs. King were the recipients of a series of invitations to attend celebratory ceremonies to celebrate the independence of Ghana.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Friday, November 4, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses British royalties for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK Requesting a Leave of Absence from the S.C.L.C.

Monday, June 13, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell requests a one-year leave of absence from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to work with Citizens Crusade Against Poverty. Blackwell will assist the S.C.L.C. sister organization with its emerging Southern Rural Development Project.

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service

Sunday, September 11, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service Program outlines the events for September 11, 1966. Dr. King is the guest speaker to commemorate "the retirement of Rev. D. C. Rice from the pastorship of The Union Baptist Church."

Statement Regarding the Passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964

Dr. King gives a brief statement regarding the importance of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King quotes a segment of Professor John Baille's work regarding self-consciousness and God.

Teleological Argument

Dr. King quotes Immanuel Kant’s view of the teleological argument from “Critique of Pure Reason.”


Dr. King cites Aristotle's ideas regarding matter and form.

Schleiermacher (What Is the Operation of Grace)

Dr. King records a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher's work "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Thursday, December 9, 1965
Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

After hearing Dr. King's speech at Billanova University, Mr. Brownlow requests that the Reverend speak at the Haverford School located in Pennsylvania. Secondarily, Brownlow requests that Dr. King send a few words of congratulations to a student attending the college.

Letter to Mrs. H.G. Smith from MLK

Wednesday, October 13, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Smith for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the current efforts of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Robert L. Cope

Dr. King references Robert L. Cope’s article “Nature and/or Grace.”

Letter from Alfred Hearin to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Alfred Hearin expresses to Dr. King that he admires him and that he has faith in his ability to help mankind. He then asks Dr. King to send him a handwritten letter and a photograph of himself for his collection.

Letter from Rev. Lane Barton to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Selma, AL

Rev. Lane Barton, on behalf of Rev. James Pike and the St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission, corresponds with Dr. King in relation to their recent journey to Selma. In this positive affirmation Rev. Barton states, "I pray that the spirit of the living God which is going to and fro in the land and walking up and down in it will grasp us all and refashion us into one truly free and united republic."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about Speaking Out Article

Friday, September 11, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, communicates with Mr. Hunt of Speaking Out regarding payment and schedule of a feature article to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Josephine Davis

Monday, April 19, 1965
Chicago, IL

Dorothy Gaines thanks Josephine Davis and her friends for their generous donation to the SCLC. Gaines explains the current efforts of the SCLC as well as the monthly budget of the organization. She expresses the importance of financial contributions and encloses receipts from the donation.

Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

Letter from the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Oslo, Norway

Dr. Milnor Alexander congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to for him to speak at the Legislative Seminar during the 50th anniversary celebration of WILPF.

SCLC Participates at Chicago Conference of New Politics


Dr. King asserts that "serious distortions" from the press have defaced the image of the SCLC in regards to the organization's involvement at the Chicago Conference of New Politics. Factually, at the conference, members of the SCLC were the most active and coherent opponents of the resolution in the Middle East. The SCLC perceives that the issue in the Middle East must involve security and development. The political realities and possible methods of improvement within the Middle East are discussed and elaborated upon.

MLK Statement on Libel Suit

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding a libel suit. He explains that he has been served papers but is not at liberty to comment.

Letter from the Baptist Union of Western Canada to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The Baptist Union of Western Canada informs Dr. King that they have released him from any obligation to participate in the convention in Winnipeg. The union is conscious of Dr. King's great responsibilities and the difficulty he faces while attempting to make appearances.