Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"PUERTO RICO"

I Have A Dream

Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Colorado (CO), New York (NY), Pennsylvania (PA), New Hampshire (NH), California (CA), Tennessee (TN), Louisiana (LA)

This is an excerpt of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, as delivered at the March on Washington. The moderator asks Marion Anderson to sing, "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands."

Notes on Atlanta Housing Hearing

Friday, April 10, 1959
Washington, D.C., California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Texas (TX), Dallas, TX

This document contains the United States Commission on Civil Rights notes on an Atlanta Housing hearing. The Commission believes that Atlanta will present "new aspects of the problem." The Commission is also collecting information to determine whether equal opportunity in housing is denied due to discrimination. Also included are questions the Commission plans to ask regarding housing.

Letter from MLK to John Evarts

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
FRANCE

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, a specialized agency of the United Nations, contributes to peace and security by promoting international collaboration through education, science, and culture in order to further universal respect for justice, the rule of law, human rights, and fundamental freedoms proclaimed in the UN Charter. Dr. King thanks his contact in France after a successful joint fundraising event.

Letter from E. L. Gayden to MLK

Tuesday, February 14, 1967
Kansas (KS), ISRAEL

E. L. Gayden writes Dr. King regarding the planning of pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Gayden offers the services of the John Brown Monument and Historical Association for the organization of the tour. He also mentions that he represents a travel agency and extends his assistance to Dr. King.

Letter from Oxford JACARI to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964
London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

Frank R. Parker, Vice-Chairman of the Oxford Joint Action Committee Against Racial Intolerance (JACARI) extends yet another speaking invitation to Dr. King, emphasizing his eagerness to hear the message of non-violent resistance.

Interruptions: Man from Porlock

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Dr. King delivered this sermon, "Interruptions," on January 21, 1968 at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He describes how no one lives a life free of interruptions, and that the major problem of life is learning how to handle them.

Letter from Leon Levy to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1961
New York (NY)

Leon Levy congratulates Dr. King on his leadership and the efforts of the SCLC. Mr. Levy contributes to the organization and states that he follows Dr. King's work with interest.

Letter from Jose Luis Villar Palasi to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Madrid, Spain

Jose Luis Villar Palasi informs Dr. King tha that the Chair for Cultural Sociology has invited him to present at the Universidad of Madrid.

Flyer Advertising SCLC Benefit

Atlanta, GA

Harry Belafonte and his "entire company" host a full evening of entertainment for an SCLC benefit.

Letter from Eleanor Allen to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Rhode Island (RI), Atlanta, GA

Eleanor Allen, Director of Christian Education of the Edgewood Congregational Church, writes Dr. King in an effort to connect with a Pastor of a Negro church that is in need of rebuilding "after the recent bombings."

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Letter from CORE to MLK

Friday, February 2, 1968
Missouri (MO), Wisconsin (WI), GEORGIA

The Kansas City, Missouri Chapter of CORE writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend their Negro History Week program.

Telegram from MLK to William Dawson

Monday, March 21, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs William Dawson that the SCLC approves the plan to "transfer the Community Relations Service to the Department of Justice."

SCLC's Operation Breadbasket - Quarterly Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, Milwaukee, WI, Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, North Carolina (NC), Detroit, MI

The SCLC issued this comprehensive quarterly report on the activities of Operation Breadbasket. Operation Breadbasket focused on acquiring jobs and economic development for the Negro community through contract negotiations and boycotts.

Letter from A. Martin to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

A. Martin expresses his support for Dr. King's work, but advises Dr. King not to run for President. Martin also shares his thoughts about which candidates he considers best suited for the role of President.

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967
New York, NY, Minnesota (MN)

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

William Kivi warns Dr. King that Senator Edward Brooke is a danger to the progress made as a result of the civil rights movement. Sen. Brooke alleges that Dr. King caused major harm to the movement once he chose to speak out against the Vietnam War. In Kivi's view of Brooke and his policies, "He reasons like a true Republican-out to feather his own nest at the expense of the entire negro race-worldwide."

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL

This manifesto details the methods, accomplishments, failures and reasons for the use and postponement of direct action tactics in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Peter S. Kliewer

Thursday, July 13, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

In response to a "letter to the editor" from the "Times-Advocate" sent in by a reader, Dr. King addresses America's role in Vietnam.

Resolution from the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference

Monday, April 8, 1968
Richmond, VA

This resolution, adopted by the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference, condemns the brutal assassination of Dr. King.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from Mrs. Jena Hobbs

Monday, April 8, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Coretta Scott King received many kind and heartfelt letters of condolence, following the assassination of her husband. This document, in particular, came from Mrs. Lena Hobbs of Brooklyn, NY, who wanted to express the empathy she felt for Mrs. King and her four children. According to Mrs. Hobbs, Dr. King was a great leader that would be dearly missed.

Letter from Charles Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1968
Cincinnati, OH, New York, NY

Charles Williams thanks Dr. King for sending him an autograph.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS)

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Letter from Nathan Watts to MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Mr. Watts asks Dr. King to call off the March on Washington because of the political backlash he foresees. He predicts the march will harm the civil rights bill that is being discussed in Congress., which would later be passed as the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from T. Spurgeon Bell to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967
California (CA), Kentucky (KY)

T. Spurgeon Bell writes Dr. King to voice his concerns regarding the Civil rights movement. In his opinion the Civil Rights bill is not beneficial to the changes Dr. King seeks. He believes that such bills cannot change varying opinions on other races and asks Dr. King to alter his attempt at social change.

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967
Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, THAILAND

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

MLK Organizes Campaign for Voters

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King announces a "nationwide bipartisan drive to get out the vote on election day." King's campaign charges religious leaders across the USA to help mobilize people to vote for the upcoming presidential election.

Letter from Jessie Tidwell to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

Jessie Tidwell writes Dr. King wishing him the best of luck and expressing interest in meeting him in person.