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"PUERTO RICO"

Letter from Student Supporter Richard Hathaway to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966

Richard Hathaway, a student at Haverford College, requests a copy of a speech Dr. King delivered at the United Nations Plaza. Hathaway was a participant in the march and rally at which Dr. King spoke, but was unable to hear the speech because of the crowd.

Letter from MLK to the SCLC Executive Staff

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Dr. King informs the SCLC's Executive Board of a special meeting that will take place at Beamon's Restaurant. Outlined are the staff members who are expected to be in attendance and the topics they will review.

The Kingdom

Dr. King references New Testament passages related to The Kingdom.

Images from a Shot Sheet by Victor Summa

This piece vividly describes a poet's conception of an urban "Negro" scene. The poetic imagery paints a picture of a dilapidated neighborhood occupied by impoverished, helpless neighbors and drunkards who undergo tremendous emotional struggle. Dr. King's handwriting at the top of the poem indicates that he wanted this document filed.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Constance Baker Motley

Friday, June 22, 1962

Mr. Walker informs Mrs. Motley, Associate Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, that either he or Dr. King will be in attendance at the upcoming Lawyers Conference.

Telegram from MLK to Derhanov Dinke

Dr. King informs Ambassador Derhanov Dinke that it is his pleasure to serve as Honorary President for the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He invites Ambassador Dinke to attend a luncheon at the Sheraton Carlton Hotel in Washington, D. C.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 31:3.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Adelman

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Adelman's letter, which included a Thomas Babington Macaulay quotation that Dr. King finds still applicable.

Letter from Morton M. Brooks to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Morton Brooks writes Dr. King to check his availability for April, May, or June of 1965 to speak at Mt. Zion's Sunday morning church service. Brooks expresses that he is aware of Dr. King's busy schedule, but would appreciate his consideration.

A Lack of Jewish Soldiers

Thursday, August 25, 1966

T.S. D'Amico writes Dr. King and others over what he perceives as a lack of Jewish men being drafted into military service.

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy's Statement Following MLK's Assasination

Sunday, April 7, 1968

Rev. Abernathy acknowledges the deep pain and anger those in SCLC feel at the senseless taking of Dr. King’s life. They pledge that his work and commitment to nonviolence will continue. They are as much against violence, says Abernathy, as they are against racial and economic injustice. He announces that Mrs. King will join him in leading a march in Memphis in support of the sanitation workers and that the Poor People’s Campaign will proceed. He calls upon Congress to respond to the major loss represented by Dr.

Secrets of a Happy Marriage

Dr. King expounds upon the secrets of a happy marriage. His first point is that the husband and wife must comprehend the nature of sexes. He describes the dichotomy of a man and woman's perception of contentment. The second point Dr. King makes is that the married couple must have an understanding of the nature of marriage itself. He further asserts that a successful marriage must be built on a mutual compromise. The final contention by Dr. King is each individual must instill the sacredness of marriage.

Letter from MLK to Jimmie Wattson

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King acknowledges his receipt of Jimmie Wattson's letter and expresses his deep concern for Mr. Wattson's imprisonment. Dr. King explains to Mr. Wattson that the SCLC does not have legal staff to handle matters. Dr. King suggests that he write the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Telegram from Curtis Harris to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Mr. Harris, President of Virginia's SCLC chapter, congratulates Mrs. King on Dr. King's winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from M. I. [MS illegible] to MLK about Civil Rights

In this letter the writer asks Dr. King to continue the quest for civil rights and comments on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Dr. Lionel Newsom to Georgia Council on Human Relations Members

In the aftermath of the failure in attacking segregation in Albany, Georgia, the Chairman of the Georgia Council on Human Relations issues an appeal to its members to help support their continued fight. Dr. Lionel outlines the organization's past accomplishments and encourages members to learn from their mistakes in Albany to yield better results in the future.

Letter from Margaret Long to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Margaret Long asks Dr. King to reconsider his plans for the demonstration in Washington, D.C. She expresses that though she understands why Dr. King advocates for demonstrations, she does not believe it will be advantageous.

Letter from Dwight Campbell to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964

The Methodist Youth Fellowship extends a second invitation to Dr. King to speak to in Philadelphia. The proposed speaking engagement would coincide with Dr. King's appearance at the Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee meeting.

Letter from Clarence Henry to Robert F. Kennedy

Friday, February 2, 1962

Clarence Henry requests the immediate surveillance of Fred Shuttleworth's home by Kennedy's office in lieu of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author objects to Dr. King's journey to Jerusalem with his followers. He also expresses his perception of the Negro race.

Centennial Edition of The Nation

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

James J. Storrow, Jr., Publisher of The Nation, invites Dr. King to advertise in its 100th anniversary edition. Storrow suggests that Dr. King could write an article on SCLC's achievements and services to the community within the advertisement.

Letter from Weston E. Vivian to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965

Congressman Weston Vivian responds to Dr. King's letter regarding the seating of the Mississippi Congressman. He tells Dr. King that he not only supported the "Ryan fairness resolution" to prevent the seating, but also voted against the motion to swear in the Congressman. Although he mentions that he was in the minority regarding this matter, he assures Dr. King that he will continue to "work for the opening of the Mississippi registration and election procedures."

Social Ethics

Dr. King's references a chapter and verse from the biblical Book of Zephaniah. He notes that the passages concerning social phenomena such as infidelity, pride, selfishness and oppression are still "entirely up to date."

Letter from June Alder to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mrs. Alder expresses her support and concern regarding integrated housing.

Letter from MLK to Tharon Stevens

Dr. King responds to Mr. Stevens' previous letter and commends his courageous efforts for implementing the 1964 Civil Rights Act in Statesboro. An application to develop an SCLC affiliate in Statesboro is also enclosed.

Letter from Richard C. Gilman to MLK

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Richard C. Gilman, President of Occidental College, invites Dr. King to speak to the students at their opening convocation.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

Letter from Carey Preston to Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Mrs. Carey B. Preston confirms the details of Dr. King's trip to Philadelphia to speak at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Convention.

Russell H. Bull $1000 Scholarship

This pamphlet provides information on the Russell Bull $1,000 scholarship that is awarded by the United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, AFL-CIO. The annual scholarship is awarded to a high school or college student in financial need who displays outstanding contributions in civil rights. Dr. King is listed as one of the members of the Public Review Advisory Commission that administers the scholarship.