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"Pennsylvania (PA)"

Letter from Matthew Schechter to MLK Regarding NAACP

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
Connecticut (CT), New York, NY

Mr. Schechter encloses correspondences between hm and the NAACP regarding Dr. King's comments on the Vietnam War and the civil rights movements. Mr. Schechter is returning his membership card due to the NAACP's "uncalled for commentary" concerning Dr. King. Mr. Morsell, Assistant Executive Director of the NAACP, informs Mr. Schechter that the NAACP took a position on the issue because of numerous requests they received from local members and leaders.

Letter from Ruth H. Bunche to MLK

Saturday, September 9, 1967
New York, NY

Mrs. Ruth H. Bunche appeals to Dr. King for his financial support for Inwood House, a support system for unmarried mothers. Enclosed is a brochure describing the program and its services.

Press Conference on the Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King and SCLC members have accepted the invitation to join the fight for a quality integrated education for the children of Chicago.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles P. Forbes

Friday, March 29, 1963
Illinois (IL)

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald thanks Charles P. Forbes for sending the report on the MIA Institute.

World's Fair "Stall-In"

Dr. King comments on a civil rights demonstration scheduled to be held at the World Fair. This united act is aimed to address Negro civil concerns in relation to unified housing, education, and employment.

Contradiction

Dr. King writes a quote expressing the bounds of consciously living in contradiction.

Letter from MLK to Senator Howard Cannon

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Democratic Senator Howard Cannon of Nevada for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dieter Pichowski to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
GERMANY

Mr. Pichowski, from East Germany, is in request of Dr. King's handwriting.

New Politics Convention. Chicago, 1967

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Mrs. Edward G. Rolfe to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
Idaho (ID), New York (NY)

The wife of a wrongfully accused man, Edward G. Rolfe, pleads for Dr. King to hear her story of discrimination.

Letter from David Gibbons and David O. Woodward to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

David Woodyard and David Gibbons send Dr. King a check to support the work of the SCLC. Woodyard and Gibbons are employed at Denison University in Granville, Ohio.

Letter From Jim Letherer Regarding Proposed March

Thursday, November 23, 1967

In this letter Letherer suggests a March on Christmas Eve or Easter Sunday while expressing his continued support and participation in S.N.C.C.

Postcard from Frank J. Meinen to the SCLC

Sunday, April 8, 1962
Wisconsin (WI)

Upon recently hearing Dr. King speak, Frank J. Meinen writes the SCLC to ask how he can help.

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

Sunday, April 19, 1964
Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL)

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Fundamentalism

Dr. King cross-references fundamentalism with authoritarianism.

Letter from Richard Boone to Barbara Hicks

Friday, July 2, 1965
Montgomery, AL

Rev. Boone encloses some adverse literature to be distributed to Dr. King and others.

Letter from Barbara Meredith to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Barbara Meredith communicates with Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail. She does not understand why individuals professing to be Christians approve of segregation. Meredith offers her prayers to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy and others in the midst of the struggle to end segregation.

Peace of Mind

Dr. King quotes Marcus Aurelius about peace of mind.

Worship

Dr. King describes Edgar S. Brightman’s four attitudes of worship in “Philosophy of Religion.”

Southern Christian Leadership Resolutions

Friday, June 30, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Chauncey Eskridge sends Andrew Young resolutions related to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Mr. Eskridge explains that an examination into the foundation's tax exempt status by the IRS prompted his letter.

Letter from Polly G. to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962
Berkeley, CA, Atlanta, GA

Polly G. writes Dr. King informing him that her class is creating reports on famous people. She has chosen to write her report on Dr. King and asks him to assist her by sending some additional material along with a photograph.

Letter from Jimmie Johnson to MLK

Jimmie Johnson writes to Dr. King to say that while he is a Negro, he does not believe in integration. Johnson does not think there will ever be enough jobs in America for Negroes, and therefore argues for segregation. He asks Dr. King to share this view in his upcoming meeting with President Johnson.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harvey L. Gault

Friday, March 30, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King informs Reverend Harvey Gault that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at Bethel A. M. E. Church. Dr. King lists some of his present and future commitments in explaining the capacity of his schedule.

Letter from Dr. Earl C. Jackson, Sr. to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963
Delaware (DE), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Earl Jackson writes Dr. King requesting feedback regarding his upcoming speaking engagement as one of three keynote speakers during a large conference in Delaware.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

Invitation from Aubrey T. Edwards to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
CANADA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Aubrey T. Edward, President of the Oakville Branch for the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to make an address during the organizations designated Human Rights year.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961
INDIA, Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Ethics

Dr. King records some notes on ethics and the book of Micah.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964
New York (NY)

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

Letter to Melvin Arnold from MLK

Wednesday, December 26, 1962
New York, NY, New York (NY)

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Dr. King informed him that he has enclosed the final draft of the sixteen sermons to be included, in his second book. He also added that he was in the process of working on the final two sermons to be published in the book.