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"Pennsylvania (PA)"

Letter from Milton A. Reid to Senator Leroy Johnson

Thursday, October 10, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA)

Milton A. Reid, a candidate for State Senate, invites Georgia Senator Leroy Johnson to a banquet at Virginia State College. The event will benefit the campaign expenses and feature guest speaker Wyatt Tee Walker, Dr. King's assistant.

SCLC Administrator Job Description

Monday, August 29, 1966

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from the Algemeen Handelsblad to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
NETHERLANDS, Oslo, Norway, Birmingham, AL, NORWAY, Alabama (AL)

C. A. Steketee, chief editor of Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad, asks Dr. King to write an article about the American Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Edward Williams to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967
New York, NY

The United Presbyterian Church's Commission on Religion and Race awarded a grant to SCLC for the salary of Hosea Williams. The letter accompanies a check for partial payment.

SCLC Newsletter: April 1962

Sunday, April 1, 1962
Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Chattanooga, TN, Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Jackson, MS, Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Ohio (OH), Shreveport, LA, South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces five new members will join the staff. The five men are: John H. Calhoun, Herbert V. Coulton, James L. Bevel, Fred C. Bennette, and Bernard S. Lee. These men derive from different locations across America and add different levels of education and commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Linda F. Neslage to MLK Regarding the I Have a Dream Speech

Monday, April 3, 1967
Illinois (IL)

In this letter Linda F. Neslage of Scott Foresman and Company requests Dr. King's permission for non-profit organizations to make special editions of textbooks including his speech, "I Have A Dream."

"Danger in Demonstrations"

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), Selma, AL

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

Telegram from Burton Mousman to MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL)

In this telegram, Burton Mousman urges Dr. King to accept an invitation for an approaching speaking engagement at the CALTECH YMCA.

Anonymous Support for MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1960

An anonymous individual expresses his or her support and concerns about Dr. King's affiliation with presidential candidate John F. Kennedy.

Letter from MLK Validating Press Release

Thursday, December 1, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King validates a press release from SCLC's Department of Special Projects and Economic Development about expanding Chicago's Operation Breadbasket to a national level.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), New York, NY, London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Zwingli, H.

SWITZERLAND

Dr. King records biographical information about Swiss reformer Ulrich (or Huldrych) Zwingli.

Immortality

Dr. King writes that the belief in immortality by scholars in different disciplines suggests that while immortality cannot be proved nor has it been disproved.

Letter from A. T. Walden to MLK

Thursday, June 7, 1962
Atlanta, GA

A . T. Walden writes to Dr. King congratulating him on the performance of the SCLC lead program featuring the singing and acting of Harry Belafonte. Walden continues to express his belief by stating that the Reverend fills a unique role in the American dream of brotherhood and equality.

Letter from Frank Meranda to President Johnson

Monday, October 17, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Frank Meranda, chairman of the Boston chapter of CORE, writes President Johnson to point out that job tests for the federal government result in discrimination against minorities.

Editorial- "Lawlessness Means Bloodshed, End of Dreams"

Missouri (MO), California (CA)

In this article, light heavy-weight boxing champion Archie Moore discourages black Americans from resorting to "lawlessness" in their attempts to advance the cause of civil rights.

Telegram from Georgia AG Eugene Cook to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963

This telegram is addressed to Dr. King and originates from Mr. Cook, Attorney General of Georgia. The telegram requests for Dr. King to meet with Mr. Cook to discuss and clarify comments Dr. King made to the news media. Mr. Cook cites "under provision of the 1953 Subversive Activities Act" as the basis for such a meeting.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Advance

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses advance payment from Harper & Row for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Mary T. Clark to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964
New York (NY)

This letter from the Social Action Secretariat, National Federation of Catholic College Students references an enclosed letter which was issued to all member colleges. The enclosed letter supports student activity in the 1964 Freedom Fast.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Otline: The Philosophy of Nonviolence

This document outlines Dr. King's speech, "The Philosophy of Nonviolence." He notes both the means and ends of nonviolence and explains that the "highest expression" of non-injury is love. He describes nonviolence as an activism technique and outlines the goals of the philosophy.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Letter from Ms. McDonald to Ms. Elinor G. Galusha

Thursday, October 27, 1966
Boston, MA

In this letter dated October 28, 1966, Ms. McDonald tells Ms. Galusha that she may use an excerpt from Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from MLK to Senator Edward V. Long

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Senator Long's support in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Larry Schneider to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ)

Larry Schneider informs Dr. King that he is available for assistance with "planning and implementing" Dr. King's efforts. He also offers his thoughts on a wide variety of issues affecting the American Negro.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Washington, D.C., California (CA), Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Letter from MLK to Robert D. Rasmussen

Monday, December 13, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes Robert Rasmussen to express his regret for his inability to attend a Leadership Conference with the officials of the American Baptist Convention at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul Kurtz

Friday, January 5, 1968
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald grants Kurtz permission to print Dr. King's unedited speech "as is," as long as Kurtz indicates on the speech that is taken from a tape and is un-edited.

God

Dr. King uses a series of scriptures from the Book of Psalms and I Chronicles to show God's abiding love and faithfulness.

Letter from V.R. Hardy to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA)

V.R. Hardy lectures Dr. King regarding his methods of obtaining equality. He asserts that such methods will only result in a race of people wallowing in self-pity. Hardy cites the long-term oppression of Jews as a case in point of how to overcome the tragedies of the past.