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"Philadelphia, PA"

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Monday, October 17, 1966
Indiana (IN)

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Fiers an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Dallas, Texas for the International Convention.

Letter from Steve Rubicz to MLK

Thursday, September 20, 1962
Montgomery, AL, Washington (WA)

Steve Rubicz, of the Student Peace Union at the University of Washington, invites Dr. King to join a "speakers circuit" that will travel to a number of colleges in the Pacific Northwest.

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

The Purpose of the State

Dr. King records some thoughts on the functions of the state.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bob Alpert

Thursday, March 21, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald writes Bob Alpert of the Hotel and Club Employees Union to thank him for his previous correspondence. Miss McDonald informs Mr. Alpert that she cannot fulfill his request to receive additional copies of Dr. King's article that was published in the "Nation." However, she recommends that Alpert communicate with Carey McWilliams, editor of the "Nation," to receive those copies.

Letter from M. L. Banner to MLK

Friday, September 13, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The board of directors of the Booker T. Washington Center, Inc. requests Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker for their annual banquet. The Booker T. Washington Center is the only predominately Negro Welfare Agency in the community.

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Sunday, February 11, 1968
St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, California (CA), South Dakota (SD), New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

This critical 2-day strategy meeting of key SCLC staff takes place 2 months prior to the projected start of the Poor People’s Campaign in Washington, DC. Dr. King expresses concern that they have not met their target goals for participation. Debate ensues about whether to call off the campaign or push it to a later date, and also whether SCLC should abandon all of its other commitments to ensure the success of this project. Problems and solutions are discussed. Staff assignments made for recruitment of the poor, materials, organizational structure, tentative plan of action, D.C.

At Your Service!

Washington, D.C.

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

Letter from Lynne Ansorge to MLK

Wisconsin (WI)

Lynne Ansorge invites Dr. King to Lawrence College. He also tells Dr. King about the issues that have been occurring in their community.

Letter from Miss Edythe T. Gore to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963
Missouri (MO), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri donates $125.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.

Letter from Nathaniel L. Hawthorne to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

Nathaniel Lee Hawthorne, who describes himself as “a nonviolent militant Negro” from rural Virginia, asks Dr. King for advice on publishing a book. Hawthorne wants to tell the nation what it feels like to be poor

Note Card on Democritus' Metaphysics

In this notecard, Dr. King writes on the subject of Metaphysics, focusing on the works of Democritus.

First Congregational Church Program

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is listed to speak at an evening church service entitled, "The Immorality of Racial Segregation."

MLK Drafted as a Presidential Candidate Announcement

New York (NY), California (CA), Washington (WA)

The Peoples Committee of America drafts Dr. King as their candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election.

Formative Elements

From Alfred North Whitehead's "Religion in the Making," Dr. King records the formative elements of the temporal world.

Faith As A Way of Knowing (Wieman)

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Source of Human Good" on faith as a way of knowing.

Letter from Tetsuo Kohmoto to MLK

Thursday, June 3, 1965
Tokyo, Japan

Tetsuo Kohmoto, president of the Shinkyo Shuppansha Protestant Publishing Company, inquired to Joan Daves about publishing Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in Japanese. Mr. Kohmoto happily informs Dr. King that the Japanese edition of his book has now been "published to the reading public in Japan."

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

SCLC Audit Notice

Tuesday, December 19, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Rutherford writes to inform Citizens Trust Company that there will be an audit of the SCLC. Rutherford requests that the bank send a list of any and all accounts associated with SCLC.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 20, 1956
Montgomery, AL

As the President of Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King elaborates on the past twelve months and the city's efforts to fight against racial injustice through the bus boycott. Their journey concluded victoriously with the acknowledgment of the Supreme Court that invalidated segregated transportation. Dr. King informs the Montgomery community that they are to "return to the buses" on a "non-segregated basis."

Letter from Louis V. Sharples to MLK

Wednesday, March 31, 1965
Albany, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY)

Rev. Louis Sharples writes Dr. King to enclose a financial contribution on behalf of the Church of St. Alban the Martyn. Rev. Sharples expresses their awareness and concern for those negatively impacted by the march in Selma and hope their contribution can offer some assistance.

Letter from MLK to Tore Staav

Monday, April 25, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his sincerest gratitude to Mr. Tore Staav, the editor of Vi Magazine, for his unwavering support and sponsorship during the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Lorraine Hughes to MLK Regarding the March on Washington

Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Hughes requests that Dr. King does not proceed with the march in Washington D.C., due to the inability of poor people to conduct a peaceful movement.

Request from The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Ohio (OH)

The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization inquires if Dr. King would be available to speak to the institute about the concept of Black Power.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the meaning of a miracle.

Telegram from MLK to Mr. Sylveter A. Okereke

Friday, August 6, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King regrettably informs Mr. Okereke that he will be unable to accept his invitation for an event held on August 18, 1965.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Martin Peretz

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Ms. McDonald informs Dr. Peretz that Dr. King will be able to have lunch with him and that he will be accompanied by Reverend Andrew Young, Reverend Bernard Lee and herself.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964
JAPAN, New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd, lacking the ability to offer better figures, for the Japanese rights to "Strength to Love."

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.