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Support Correspondence from Harold Ford to MLK

Sunday, September 3, 1967
Washington (WA)

In this letter, Harold Ford stresses the importance of the movement and the need for more privileged whites to lend a helping hand. He states that everyone has a moral responsibility to ensure the welfare of man kind and no one should haphazardly turn a blind to the issues of race and economics.

MLK/SCLC Fundraising Letter and Response

Wednesday, December 27, 1961
Atlanta, GA, California (CA)

Bruce and Gertrude joins send their support and contribution on the back of the SCLC fundraising letter they received. They refer to the "old sociological truth that one cannot keep a person in the gutter without needing to stay in there himself to keep the other down there," and thank Dr. King for leadership that liberates both Negro and White.

Letter From Irving Neiman to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965
Connecticut (CT), GERMANY

Irving Neiman offers his legal services to the SCLC for their work in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Wednesday, November 2, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mr. Wachtel expresses gratitude for a grant awarded by the Stern Family Fund to the American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC.

Peter Denied His Lord, And Cryed

Sam Bradley, from Friends Journal, composes a poem illustrating Saint Peter's denial of Jesus.

SCLC Launches Chicago Political Drive

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS)

The SCLC releases a statement regarding the launching of a Chicago Political Drive, sponsored by the SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations. SCLC Southern Project Director, Hosea Williams, will head the campaign. The focuses of this campaign are voter registration and education.

Letter from Byron F. Mische to the Members of Congress Regarding Vietnam

Monday, March 20, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter to the members of Congress, Byron E. Mische took the initiative to combine letters sent to government officials, editors of publications and congressmen regarding Vietnam. This letter was copied to Dr. King.

If I were a Negro

Thursday, March 23, 1967
ISRAEL, Berlin, Germany

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Friday, November 26, 1965
Cleveland, OH, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."

News Release from Congressman John Conyers Jr.

Sunday, October 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. requests that a conference be held including Negro elected officials to support his thirty billion dollar bill to help the nation's ghettos.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on State of the Union Address

Wednesday, January 12, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King praises President Johnson for his State of the Union address. King expresses appreciation for Johnson's continued commitment to the Great Society, his call for legislation to protect those pursuing their constitutional rights and his pledge to work diligently to end the Vietnam War.

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King quotes George Hedley’s “The Symbol of the Faith.”

Comment On Proposed Resolution: Ending Racism in the Democratic Party

Friday, October 9, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Texas (TX), New Jersey (NJ)

On October 9th, 1964, the Democratic National Convention adopted a resolution ending racial discrimination in Party membership.

Letter from Henry Hart Rice to MLK

Monday, June 5, 1967
New York, NY

Henry Hart Rice sends Dr. King a contribution to express his support for the work of the SCLC.

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

Voter Registration Campaige in Atlanta

Atlanta, GA

This document provides a historical reference of voter registration campaigns held in Atlanta, Georgia. The information includes participating organizations as well as strategies and overall goals.

Letter from Adele Fishman to MLK

Monday, August 31, 1964
Montgomery, AL, California (CA), New York (NY)

The American Book Company is requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail." They hope to include the letter, in a text book, entitled THE STREAM OF AMERICAN HISTORY, THIRD Edition. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.

Request from The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Ohio (OH)

The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization inquires if Dr. King would be available to speak to the institute about the concept of Black Power.

Letter from Richard Dannenfelser to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966
Ohio (OH), Columbus, OH, Atlanta, GA

The acting chaplain of Ohio Wesleyan University inquires of Dr. King's availability to speak at their college during his trip to Columbus. Dr. King is scheduled to address the Ohio Council of Churches Pastors' Convention.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

Letter from Harper & Row Publishers to Joan Daves

Friday, March 10, 1967
New York, NY

Harper & Row, Publishers representative Cass Canfield provides feedback about Dr. King's manuscript for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" to Joan Daves, Dr. King's agent. Canfield suggests replacing the last chapter of of the draft with a briefer and less expansive final section.

Letter from Dolores H. Autuore to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
New York, NY

Mrs. Autuore encloses some checks that were misplaced temporarily while offering her gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to Pine Island.

Messianic Hope

Dr. King writes on the concept of "Messianic Hope" as covered in the Old Testament book, Micah.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to Richard M. Austin

Friday, February 2, 1968
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

William A. Rutherford, Executive Director of the SCLC, requests that Rev. Austin join a SCLC support committee. The support committee will offer assistance to the SCLC's upcoming campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter of Thanks From MLK To Reverend Taylor

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King writes to Reverend Gardner C. Taylor, the pastor of the Concord Baptist Church of Christ, to thank him for his support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Black Power and Liberation: A Communist View

New York (NY), New York, NY

Arnold Johnson, Public Relations Director of Communist Party U. S. A, requests commentary on Claude Lightfoot's pamphlet "A Note on Black Power and Liberation." The pamphlet has sparked discussions in the public press and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965
New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."