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"Philadelphia, PA"

Letter to Jesse Jackson from Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 30, 1966
Chicago, IL, New York, NY

Dr. King request the attendance of Rev. Jesse Jackson at a meeting that will discuss the distribution of grant funds for a program regarding nonviolence and social change.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Oliver Kannon

Wednesday, July 11, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Kannon that Dr. King will be unable to accept the Easton NAACP's invitation to speak.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Wayne C. Hess

Wednesday, November 2, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Rev. Hess and the participants in the Illinois Conference Evangelical United Brethren Church for their contribution to the SCLC.

Response from MLK to Paul Yeiter

Monday, January 8, 1968

Dr. King responds to Yeiter's questioning of his support of plans to boycott the 1968 Olympic games. Dr. King argues that Negro athletes have presented specific and reasonable demands to the Olympic Committee, which reflects a valid concern for the social welfare and progress of the whole nation. He commends these athletes for their determination and courageous stand against racism and injustice.

Letter from David Morgan to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

David Morgan writes this letter of condolence to Coretta Scott King following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Thomas Hirst to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Thomas E. Hirst re-extends Dr. King an invitation for a speaking engagement at the Law School Forum of the University of Alberta. The Law School Forum publicly presents many intellectuals to present to their audience and provide community service. Mr. Hirst asserts that Canada serves as a neighbor to the United States and is concerned with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Marshall C. Dandy to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Marshall C. Dendy, the Executive Secretary of the Board of Christian Education, invites Dr. King to be a speaker for the organization's conference in Montreat. Dendy also suggests that Dr. King reconsider his stance on America's involvement in Vietnam, even though he also detests war.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Howard University, Atlanta, GA, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, MEXICO, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from James A. Farmer to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

Mr. Farmer thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Riverside Church for being their guest speaker. He tells Dr. King of the positive reaction that he received on his sermon.

Letter from Charles H. K. to MLK

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Charles H. K., from the University of Montreal, encloses a financial contribution and informs Dr. King that he is moving to Canada and would like information on how to continue his contributions.

Support Negro Business

Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

This ad by Operation Breadbasket contains a letter from Dr. King promoting support of Negro businesses.

Telegram from Minsters of Operation Breadbasket to Robert E. Slater

Wednesday, November 22, 1967
Boston, MA, Baltimore, MD

The John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company is called to discuss racial discrimination. Ministers from Operation Breadbasket explain that they will commence an investigation to possibly eradicate the unequal employment practices of the company.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), GERMANY, VIETNAM, BRAZIL, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter From Donald A. DiNuccio to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Rhode Island (RI)

Sixteen-year-old Donald DiNuccio writes Dr. King expressing his opinion on the "racial problem" and extends his support.

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

California (CA)

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Kierkegaard (Paradox)

Dr. King quotes Kierkegaard and comments on his view of paradox.

Letter from Ruth Wood to MLK

Virginia (VA)

Ruth Wood of Virginia offers her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their efforts in search of a better society. Mrs. Wood also expresses her pleasure at attending Ebenezer Baptist Church and intends to attend the upcoming SCLC meeting.

Letter from Vivian Cintron to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vivian Cintron, who is a student, offers her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Let's Save Virginia Seminary

Tuesday, September 19, 1961
Virginia (VA)

Reverend Virgil A. Wood implores his church, other churches and friends in the constituency of Virginia Seminary to not only continue their support, but to double it if possible.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
Oslo, Norway, Washington, D.C., London, England, New York (NY)

In this letter Ms. Daves informs Dr. King that she is working to solve issue of copyright for his Oslo University address, and stresses the importance of copyrighting all of his "writings...and speeches."

Gunnar Jahn's 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Speech on MLK

Oslo, Norway, Montgomery, AL

Gunnar Jahn shares background information about Dr. King prior to presenting him the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. In his speech, Jahn informs the audience about the bus boycotts and the campaign for equality that Dr. King led. He also discusses Dr. and Mrs. King's choice to leave the easier life in the North to fight a racial battle in the South. Lastly he discusses Dr. King's dedication to his church and his faith in God.

For Healing of The Nations

Sunday, February 14, 1954

The National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA publishes this brochure on peace and race relations, calling Christians into action with the responsibility of making brotherhood a reality. Guidelines are presented for individual Christians and Churches to follow in order to create a world full of love and free of racial turmoil.

Letter from Mrs. Raphael Demos to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Monday, February 10, 1958
Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL

Mrs. Demos thanks Mrs. King for her Christmas card and expresses congratulations on the birth of Martin Luther III. Mrs. Demos goes on to provide Coretta with various updates occurring in her own life.

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
London, England

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

Letter from Harper & Row, Publishers Regarding Royalties

Friday, October 2, 1964
New York (NY)

Harper & Row Publishers write to inform the recipient that they deducted money from an enclosed royalty check due to an outstanding balance for books purchased.

Letter from Rose Mary to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Chicago, IL

Seventh grader Rose Mary writes to Dr. King commending his efforts concerning "racial problems" and informing him of her admiration.

Education Versus Religion

Dr. King records notes about the leadership of the intellectual and religious communities from Edwin E. Aubrey's "Present Theological Tendencies."

Spelman College Founders Day

Sunday, April 10, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is a program for Spelman College's Seventy-Ninth Anniversary Founders Day celebration, which featured an address by Dr. King.

Letter from Barbara W. Moffett to William Rutherford

Monday, January 8, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Barbara Moffett discusses the possibility of coordinating efforts and collaborative participation between the American Friends Service Committee and SCLC.

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."