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Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C.

This telegram forwarded by Rodney Clurman to Dr. King sends word regarding the need for transportation, food, medical supplies and water. Clurman also makes mention of a smallpox epidemic, stating that fifty million may die from the disease. He closes by encouraging the Reverend to wire him if interested in accompanying him to Scotland.

Letter From DuPree Jordan to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA

DuPree Jordan, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, hopes to meet with Dr. King and hear his suggestions and ideas to improve any of the OEO's programs.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan Jackson

Selma, AL

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan in the passing of Mrs. Portlock. The King's highlight Mrs. Portlock's positive attributes and her great inspirational influence.

Letter from Marvin T. Robinson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967
California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Reverend Marvin T. Robinson, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, requests that Dr. King submit a written statement on personal stationary for the Souvenir Journal, a Seventy-Fifth Anniversary release issued by the Friendship Baptist Church.

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from the Martin Luther King Fund to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

A representative from the Martin Luther King Fund corresponds with Miss McDonald to schedule a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago, Illinois.

Montanism

Dr. King records information about the second century Christian movement known as Montanism.

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.

Letter from MLK to Office of Inspector of Foreign Dividends

Saturday, January 18, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King states that he is the beneficial owner of the Copyright Royalties paid by Laurence Pollinger, Ltd. and that he is still receiving income from them.

Telegram from Paul Deitrich to John Lewis

Sunday, March 21, 1965
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL

Paul Deitrich commends John Lewis for his speech in Washington and urges him to contact him whenever he is in Washington again. He also wants to express a much-delayed apology.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

Wednesday, April 25, 1962
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Letter from Kenyan Student to MLK

Monday, March 5, 1962
PUERTO RICO, KENYA

A student writes Dr. King expressing support for his movement and social views in regards to Civil Rights.

Letter from MLK to D. Martin Fischer about American People

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
GERMANY, Berlin, Germany

Dr. King thanks Prof. Fischer for "submitting [his] thoughts and words of warning for the American People." Dr. King agrees with the professor's assertion that we should all try to "avoid the excesses and horrors of war."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Israel M. Augustine

Wednesday, February 20, 1963
Louisiana (LA)

Dora McDonald forwards a letter from Jessie Owens to Attorney Israel M. Augustine concerning potential legal counsel. Owens sought help concerning money and furniture that were taken from him.

Letter from T. Z. Riggins to MLK

Sunday, July 26, 1964
Washington (WA)

T. Z. Riggins writes Dr. King a thoughtful letter commending his leadership and the influence he brings to America. Aside from Abraham Lincoln, Riggins views Dr. King as the only leader who can bring people together. Riggins believes that Dr. King's job was assigned to him by God and expresses his pride that Dr. King was chosen to "lay the foundation" for the US.

God (Zephaniah)

ISRAEL

Dr. King discusses the Book of Zephaniah which includes the perception of God and the people of Israel.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, Washington, D.C.

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Telegram from Dr. F. Earl McLendon to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. McLendon, President of the Atlanta Medical Association, offers aid to Dr. King and the people of Selma, Alabama after incidents of police brutality.

Neighborhood Spotlight on Greater Cleveland

Cleveland, OH

This document contains information regarding the Urban League Housing Program, which provides statistical information on the communities in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area.

Nature of Religion

Dr. King indicates Schleiermacher's view on the nature of religion.

Letter from MLK to Lavera Davis

Monday, March 1, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church to speak at an upcoming Civil Rights Day event.

Letter from Virginia Madden to Mrs. King

Sunday, October 25, 1964
Philadelphia, PA

Virginia Madden, a 91-year-old white woman from Philadelphia, writes to congratulate Mrs. King on Dr. King's winning the Nobel Peace Prize. She says she has deplored racism and welcomes the new Civil Rights Law.

Report of A Participant

VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

Letter from Odell to Dora McDonald

Odell writes to Ms. McDonald, requesting a signature of an enclosed letter from Dr. King.

Letter from Solomon and Dorothy Zeltzer to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
California (CA)

The Zeltzer family send warm regards and support to the King family.

Letter from Alfonzo Henderson to Afro-Americans

Detroit, MI, New York (NY), New York, NY, Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This letter from ARIDO (Afro-American Resource Industrial Development Organization) president Alfonzo Henderson outlines the organization's program goals.

Letter from MLK to Richard Bennett

Thursday, April 6, 1967
Minnesota (MN), ISRAEL

Dr. King graciously declines Mr. Bennett's invitation to speak in St. Paul under the sponsorship of the Minnesota Federation of Teachers. Dr. King will be traveling to Israel and Africa during this time.

Moving to Another Mountain

Connecticut (CT), EGYPT, Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, JORDAN

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.