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Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

Religious Education

Dr. King discusses the topic of religious education. King asserts that religious education should not become a substitute for personal evangelism and that "religious instruction without conversion is comparatively ineffective."

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Memorandum from Carole to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Carole requests that Ms. McDonald channels several correspondence to Dr. King from those who will participate in a Convention.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to Mr. T. M. Alexander, Jr.

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

Mr. Rutherford writes Mr. Alexander explaining that members of the SCLC were not aware of the purchase of stock made on behalf of the organization. He explains to Mr. Alexander that the organization is in complaint of and will protest Mr. Alexander's actions.

Atlanta Operation Breadbasket Bi-Annual Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Reverend Fred C. Bennette, Jr. issues the bi-annual report for the Atlanta Chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Bennette expounds on the mission of Dr. King and the SCLC to create economic opportunities through advances in employment.

Food and Population Crisis Committee

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Dr. David Lubbock and Dr. Jo Alter describe the economic conditions in New Delhi, India. The document lists the operations, communications, medical assistance, food and other things needed to provide relief to the population involved in the crisis.

God: Judeo-Christian View vs. Greek View

Dr. King cites a passage from the Old Testament book of Psalms to compare and contrast the Jewish and Greek view of God.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Joan Daves reminds Dr. King of her request for an available copy of his "doctors dissertation", for possible national and international publication.

Letter from Rabbi Philip Hiat to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963

Rabbi Philip Hiat, Executive Vice-President of the Synagogue Council of America, invites Dr. King to meet with Jewish religious leaders.

Chapter II - The Methodologies of Tillich and Wieman

This is the third chapter of Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conception of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from Irene S. Heath to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964

Professor Irene Heath writes from Uruguay to suggest white missionary activity in Africa end, and that Dr. King and other black Christian leaders return to Africa to do missionary work there.

Letter from Meir Weiss to MLK

Saturday, August 5, 1967

Meir Weiss reports the facts that he has learned about Dr. King. He also requests an autographed picture and additional information about Dr. King's life.

Petition for Charter, the Filing of the Clerk and Certificate of the Secretary of State for Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Thursday, March 24, 1966

The following is a copy of the cover for the petition for charter,the filing of the Clerk and certificate of the Secretary of State for "Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Inc.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Judy Richardson

Mrs. King expresses her support for the SNCC's Negro History Primer program. She also provides Miss Richardson with her contact information so that a later meeting can be arranged.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Friday, May 10, 1963

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

Nonviolence

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Clinton Warner

Thursday, May 20, 1965

In this telegram, Dr. King informs Dr. Clinton Warner of Sammy Davis Jr.'s performance at a freedom benefit concert being sponsored by the SCLC. Dr. King then requests that Dr. Warner serve as one of the honorary chairman of the event.

Immortality (By Tennyson)

Abstract: Dr. King quotes Alfred, Lord Tennyson's "The Ancient Sage."

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Advertisement for Ku Klux Klan Segregation Meeting

This advertisement invites every white person who supports segregation to attend an upcoming meeting sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bob Alpert

Thursday, March 21, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Bob Alpert of the Hotel and Club Employees Union to thank him for his previous correspondence. Miss McDonald informs Mr. Alpert that she cannot fulfill his request to receive additional copies of Dr. King's article that was published in the "Nation." However, she recommends that Alpert communicate with Carey McWilliams, editor of the "Nation," to receive those copies.

SNCC Annual Conference Program 1960

Sunday, October 16, 1960

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee concludes their annual conference with a rally featuring prominent student leaders. This program outlines the itinerary for the last event of the three day conference and includes SNCC's Statement of Purpose.

MLK Notes

Dr. King expresses concern about common attitudes towards the Church. In his words, "So often people will do a good thing, and then spoil it by some ugly twist of the spirit."

New York City's Salute to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Upon return to the US after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King was awarded the City of New York Medallion of Honor by Mayor Robert Wagner. This document is a program from the event, "Salute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." It lists the featured speakers and entertainment.

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

To the Negroes of America

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

Letter from MLK to Walter Harding

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the dedication of Walter Hardin's book. Walter Hardin was considered a distinguished professor and scholar at State University College of Geneseo, New York.

Letter from L. Martinez to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Mrs. L. Martinez describes to Dr. King what she has observed about the Lawndale area in Chicago, Illinois. She suggests that instead of relocating to other neighborhoods, the tenants of Lawndale initiate a clean up of the area themselves.