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"RUSSIAN FEDERATION"

Letter from MLK to Louis O. Kelso

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Attorney Louis O. Kelso for sending him an autographed copy of, "How to Turn Eighty Million Workers into Capitalists on Borrowed Money."

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Monday, January 15, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Harry Wachtel gives Dr. King a monetary birthday gift that he tells Dr. King to use on a much needed vacation.

Who is Truly Great

Dr. King addresses the subject of individual greatness within society and how to truly go about achieving such a status. He begins by dispelling common signifiers of greatness before indicating that greatness can only be substantively measured through the ability to put others before self. Dr. King cites the life of Jesus Christ as an example of humility culminating into greatness.

Letter from Gloria Caruthers to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Miss Caruthers congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She states that no other individual is more deserving of the award.

Race

Dr. King references quotations from George-Louis Leclerc (Comte de Buffon) and Jean-Baptiste Lamarck concerning the creation of racial identification.

Urban Insurance Coverage

Washington, D.C.

Congressman William S. Moorhead introduces legislation to the House of Representatives, seeking to improve urban insurance coverage and provide governmental riot reinsurance.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA), Connecticut (CT), Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), North Carolina (NC), Maryland (MD), Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL), UNITED KINGDOM, Memphis, TN

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

ABC's Issues and Answers: MLK Interview

Sunday, June 18, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, ISRAEL, FRANCE, UNITED KINGDOM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Texas (TX), Birmingham, AL, Baltimore, MD, Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, California

Dr. King sat down with Tom Jerriel, Atlanta Bureau Chief, and John Casserly, Washington Correspondent, of the American Broadcasting Company for their program "Issues and Answers." They discussed the civil rights movement, Dr. King's upcoming book, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that Dr. King would serve jail time in Birmingham.

Letter from James Shaffer and James Barfield

Friday, July 29, 1966
Missouri (MO)

Mr. Shaffer and Mr. Barfield both thank Dr. King and the SCLC for thier works for humanity.

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967
VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."

Letter from Mark Cohen to MLK

Saturday, September 25, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Mark Cohen, of the Political Union of Central High School, requests for Dr. King to speak at the school regarding peace and civil rights on the same day he's addressing the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom in Philadelphia.

Origen

Dr. King records biographical information about Origen.

Man

Dr. King quotes Jonathan Swift’s scathing assessment of man.

Handwriiten Notecard Regarding Freedom

This notecard written by Dr. Martin Luther King, cites a quote, of Tillich, regarding freedom.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

Friday, March 1, 1963
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, Atlanta, GA

SCLC highlights its affiliate activities, fundraisers and efforts to rebuild burned churches in this newsletter from March of 1963. One of the cover stories focuses on the repeal of segregation laws in Albany, Georgia. The "Profile of the Month" article features Milton A. Reid and discusses his contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.

Memo from Theodore Brown

Monday, January 22, 1968
NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from Richard Dannenfelser to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966
Ohio (OH), Columbus, OH, Atlanta, GA

The acting chaplain of Ohio Wesleyan University inquires of Dr. King's availability to speak at their college during his trip to Columbus. Dr. King is scheduled to address the Ohio Council of Churches Pastors' Convention.

Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Thursday, July 20, 1967
Texas (TX), VIETNAM

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

The True Nature of Religion

Dr. King discusses the true nature of religion as both an inward and outward experience. The subject "He" is unidentified.

Letter from Susan Neisuler to MLK

Sunday, August 14, 1966
New York, NY

Susan Neisuler encourages Dr. King to speak out against anti-semitism, for there are many Jews who believe that "black power" means anti-semitism.

Letter from Norue Crickson to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Michigan (MI)

Twelve-year-old Norue Crickson commends Dr. King for his civil rights efforts. He expresses that from now on he will offer his "prayers for this cause."

Adverse Letter from Mrs. Arthur Kornoelje to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
Michigan (MI)

Mrs. Kornoelje expresses her loss of faith in Dr. King. Kornoelje objects to the negro race as a whole, and feels that 90% of crimes in Grand Rapids are committed by negroes.

Letter from Maurice N. Eisendrath to Dr. Bernard Lee

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Maurice N. Eisendrath request Dr. Bernard Lee to provide a list of the contributors from Dr. King's address to the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. The list is to facilitate Mr. Eisendrath in contacting other contributors to raise additional funds for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Message from the President

Dr. King expounds on the importance of nonviolence and voter registration to the mission of the SCLC.

Peace of Mind or Soul

Dr. King quotes French physiologist Dr. Charles Richet.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable Joseph S. Clark

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Senator Joseph S. Clark of Pennsylvania to commend his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Religion

Dr. King writes that religion is paradoxical.

Letter from MLK

Texas (TX), CANADA, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King thanks the supporters of the "Martin Luther King Fund" for their integral role in the effort to end poverty and discrimination.

Letter from Zelma Dodd to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

Zelma Dodd sends Dr. King her best wishes along with two poems entitled, "The Soul of a Black Man," and "A Negro Soldier."