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"RUSSIAN FEDERATION"

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

Montesquieu

Dr. King cites the political philosopher Montesquieu on his ideology of the weakness of laws. He further details the comparison of coexistence and consecutive social status. Dr. King concludes with the elaboration of Montesquieu's use of facts.

Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1966

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

A Knock At Midnight

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

Letter from Rev. John B. Morris to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

Rev. John B. Morris writes Dr. King while he is in the city jail in Atlanta, Georgia. Morris asserts that Dr. King's stay in jail will "renew strength to the student movement."

Letter from Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Pastor Marshall L. Shepard invites Dr. King to the Dedication Service for the Mount Olivet Village Corporation in Philadelphia.

Letter from President Johnson to Alan Westin

Monday, February 28, 1966

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Professor Alan Westin, of Columbia University, to congratulate him on the formation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Letter from MLK to Kenneth Keating

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

In this dictation by Dr. King, he expresses gratitude to the Honorable Kenneth B. Keating for his leadership in securing the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 1, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Ms. Dora McDonald that all matters pertaining to the published works of Dr. King must pass through her office, as she is the literary agent for Dr. King.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the universe.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, shares a quotation from W.E.B. DuBois' "The Souls of Black Folk." The excerpt is consistent with Dr. King's view on the importance of "keeping white allies in the civil rights movement."

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Brightman's Idea of God

Dr. King references philosopher and theologian Edgar Brightman's idea of God. According to Brightman, God is finite and "powerful enough to lead the work toward higher and higher levels."

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Gates

Monday, November 25, 1963

Dr. King thanks Robert Gates for his contribution to the SCLC. King encloses an official receipt and expresses that his contribution will assist in their work in Birmingham and throughout the South.

Invitation to SCLF Celebration from MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Dr. King sent this telegram to 30 prominent members of the Philedelphia community, inviting them to join the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation in presenting the Star for Freedom to Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, and Signey Poitier.

Fifth Anniversary Observance

Sunday, February 14, 1965

This is a draft of the program for the fifth anniversary observance for Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Brochure: "Some Important Fiscal Facts about the SCLC"

This document contains information about SCLC's administration, role, duties, and actions that its staff fulfills with the money donated to the organization.

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, July 2, 1962

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

Faith and Reason

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God."

MLK's Sermon Notes

Dr. King composed these notes in preparation for a sermon. The themes include faith, man's dealing with crisis, and "God's Search for Man."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964

Joan Daves provides the figures for royalties and advances of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ivor M. Liss

Friday, April 19, 1963

Dora McDonald thanks Ivor M. Liss for his contribution, and informs him that Dr. King will be in contact upon his return from Birmingham, Alabama.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

Letter from Joseph A. Scahill to Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Following Dr. King's assassination, Minister Joseph Scahill sent this letter of sympathy to Mrs. King. Minister Scahill mentioned, briefly, his participation in the 1965 Selma campaign with Dr. King and vowed to continue such work.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.