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Letter Dated 11/14/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Wednesday, November 14, 1962

Per Dr. King's request, Ms. Dora McDonald forwards the sermon "The Man Was A Fool," to Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishing. The sermon is to be included in a forthcoming book of Dr. King's sermons.

Telegram from Rev T R Albert to MLK

Rev. T.R. Albert, Pastor of Weslay Methodist Church, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, sent Dr. King words of encouragment while he recovered in the Harlem hospital.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Letter from Carl A. Auerbach to MLK

Monday, December 6, 1965

Carl A. Auerbach has declined to make contributions to the S.C.L.C based on the assumption that Dr. King will use the funds for protest movements "against the American policy in Vietnam."

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

A First Step Toward School Integration

This article on the first steps toward school integration includes a foreword by Dr. King. The article goes into some detail about the events regarding the integration of schools in Nashville, Tennessee.

Draft Letter from MLK to Reverend Jackson

Dr. King replies to Rev. Jackson's letter of April 22. He apologizes for the delay and assures Rev. Jackson that he will send thank you messages to everyone listed in his initial letter. Dr. King also tells Rev. Jackson that he hopes their friendship has not been affected by recent circumstances.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 9, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King a royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength To Love."

Postcard from Carl S. to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

The sender of this postcard informs Dr. King that he supports King's planned trips to Colorado and California.

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."

Letter to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Letter from Sheldon C. Singer to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

The Executive Vice President of Ring Radio informs Dr. King of attacks made by callers to the station's "Openline" program. He also invites Dr. King to respond to the attacks.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Tullberg to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

The Tullberg family from New Hampshire conveys their support to Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. They believe that the war is a violation of the basic principles of human rights.

Materialism

Dr. King references author Emil Carl Wilm's publication, "The Problem of Religion."

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

Tuesday, May 17, 1966

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

Correspondence - Mrs. King from The Alumni Association of Antioch College/ Alumni Fund 4/26/60

Tuesday, April 26, 1960

This 1960 fundraising letter is from the Alumni Association of Mrs. King's alma mater, Antioch College. The fundraising committee for the Alumni Association sent this appeal to Mrs. King as a request for her continued support.

MLK Thanks a Contributing Author

Dr. King writes to Mr. Morrow thanking him for sending a written manuscript of Marrow's new book. He apologizes for being unable to fully assist him in his writing endeavors.

Letter from Elaine Haley to Senator George Murphy

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

Elaine Haley sends a letter to Senator George Murphy discussing Dr. King's views on riots in relation to ending the Vietnam War.

Letter from Wilmer Young to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Wilmer Young writes Dr. King commending him for taking a stand against the Vietnam War and its connection with civil rights.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, August 3, 1964

Ms. Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her conversation with Harper & Row concerning the advertisements for the book "Why We Can't Wait." She describes their negotiations and asks for further guidance.

Letter from W. A. F. Braem to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mr. Braem writes Dr. King emphasizing the importance of self-reliance. Braem list some issues that Civil Rights leaders should pay attention to such as education.

Letter from Virginia Madden to Mrs. King

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Virginia Madden, a 91-year-old white woman from Philadelphia, writes to congratulate Mrs. King on Dr. King's winning the Nobel Peace Prize. She says she has deplored racism and welcomes the new Civil Rights Law.

Letter to A.C. Skinner from Rev. Abernathy

Monday, January 9, 1967

Rev. Abernathy writes to inform Mr. Skinner of the crucial financial situation the SCLC is facing due to decreased contributor support after the "Black Power cry." He is asking the International Union of Mine Mill and Smelter Workers for a generous monetary contribution within the coming weeks.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Letter from MLK to Mr. D.A. Edwards

Friday, May 5, 1967

This letter was sent to Mr. Edwards expressing Dr. King's appreciation for his contribution to the Civil Rights cause.

Thompson Memorial Chapel Program Featuring MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1961

This program highlights Dr. King as guest preacher for Thompson Memorial Chapel's Sunday service.

Letter from Joseph Looney to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966

Joseph Looney writes Dr. King inviting him to visit American College in Louvain, Belgium. Looney suggests the Reverend lead a discussion regarding the developments in the Civil Rights struggle and his role in it. Looney closes by praying that God will bless Dr. King and his family.

3000 Jackson Negros Flay Headstart Cutoff

This article discusses the protest of African Americans to the ending of the Headstart nursey program, and the reallocation of those funds to other state programs.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, April 16, 1967

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Telegram from Mrs. Frances Lucas to C. T. Vivian and Alvin Pitcher

Thursday, January 9, 1969

Mrs. Lucas informs Mr. Vivian and Mr. Pitcher of Mrs. King's unavailability to speak at the YMCA in Chicago. A memorial service in honor of Dr. King is scheduled on the same date in Atlanta.