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"The Negro's Road to Equality" by Roscoe Drummond

Washington, D.C.

This article reports on the historic decision of the United States Supreme Court to end segregation in 1954. Outlining a brief narrative of segregation in America, the writer makes it clear that the decision was imperative and timely.

Abstract of "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement"

This document is an abstract entitled "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement," with references to Dr. King's viewpoint.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Florida (FL)

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), California (CA), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, CHINA, JAPAN, MEXICO, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Georgia (GA), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), GUATEMALA, COLOMBIA, PERU, THAILAND, CAMBODIA, MOZAMBIQUE, GERMANY, PHILIPPINES, UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, HAITI, NICARAGUA, South Africa

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King shortly after President Kennedy's assassination to urge him to take precautions.

Letter from Rev. John Bartos to MLK Regarding "Strength to Love"

Monday, March 1, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Rev. John Bartos referenced Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in his sermon to the First Baptist Church congregation. Rev. Bartos focused on the chapter "Being a Good Neighbor," in which Dr. King discusses a story of a car accident and the discriminatory triage process that contributed to the occupants' deaths. The sermon produced questions and reactions the writer is hoping Dr. King can address.

Letter from MLK to Pasteur Jacques Martin

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
FRANCE

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Jacques Martin for his recent visit to Lyons, France. Dr. King also wishes to send greetings to some other associates there.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James Halsey

Wednesday, March 20, 1963
Connecticut (CT)

Dora McDonald sends, at Dr. King's request, a check to Dr. James Halsey.

Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Wisconsin (WI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This contract outlines the details of a speaking engagement for Dr. King on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin, Marathon County Center.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm to MLK about a Humanity Button

Friday, March 1, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

In this letter Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm enclose a button called the "Pentagon of Humanity," which the Heussenstamm's also sent to the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Accordingly the symbol represents “love, unity and wisdom—the community of man.”

Letter from Eleanor Martin to MLK

Wednesday, August 14, 1963
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Eleanor Martin, a Sunday school teacher at Triedstone Baptist Church, praises Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love." She also invites Dr. King to visit her Sunday school class when he visits Cleveland again.

MLK's Address to Addison Junior High

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King explains the importance of education and encourages the students to exercise their abilities to the fullest and strive for excellence. Dr. King further describes the duties each student must fulfill to make an impact on their community and the world.

Letter from Joseph T. Beaver to MLK

Wednesday, October 1, 1958
MEXICO, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), San Francisco, CA, LIBERIA, Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), Illinois (IL)

Joseph Beaver, Jr. sends his sympathy to Dr. King following the attempt on Dr. King's life. He had originally included a biography of Wendell Phillips Dabney.

Long Distance Call List for Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wednesday, September 24, 1958
Chicago, IL

Dr. King received many calls from around the country wishing him well, following his 1958 stabbing. Here is an example of a few of those long distance phone calls to Dr. King.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter Ms. Daves covers several topics relating to dealings with publishers and the protocol in the future. She makes a number of recommendations on the allocation of Dr. King's time and resources and stresses the priority of "a constructive and continuing publishing program related to your work and ideas."

List of Messages to MLK

New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, PA, VIETNAM, Cincinnati, OH, New Orleans, LA, Cleveland, OH

A list of messages including names, dates, and organizations intended for Dr. King, soliciting his response.

Letter from H.M. Arrowsmith to MLK

AUSTRALIA, London, England, UNITED KINGDOM, New York (NY), New York, NY, PAPUA NEW GUINEA

General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Australia, Canon H. M. Arrowsmith, M.B.E., extends Dr. King an official invitation to visit Australia in May 1967. It is the Society's hope that Dr. King's trip will focus primarily on the role of the Bible in relation to the "stature and the status of Man" and the "question of racial equality" throughout the world.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter from Tommy Wilkins to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 28, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Tommy Wilkins writes Dora McDonald to inquire about a book loaned to Dr. King during his attendance at Emory University. Wilkins then requests its return and extends his best wishes to the SCLC for their work in Albany.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York, NY

This is a debit memo for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

The Chicago Plan

Friday, January 7, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), Indiana (IN), Louisville, KY, Birmingham, AL, CONGO / ZAIRE, BELGIUM, SOUTH AFRICA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY

Dr. King laments over Chicago becoming so much like the South that many African Americans moved north to get away from. Dr. King lays out reasons why African Americans suffer more in Chicago than any other northern city and provides directions to correct the problem.

Let There Be Peace On Earth and Let It Begin With me

Monday, April 13, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Pennsylvania (PA)

The program chairman for the Bucks County World Peace Fair invites Mr. and Mrs. King to speak on behalf of the Civil Rights movement. The event will be held on September 12, 1964.

Russell H. Bull $1000 Scholarship

Chicago, IL

This pamphlet provides information on the Russell Bull $1,000 scholarship that is awarded by the United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, AFL-CIO. The annual scholarship is awarded to a high school or college student in financial need who displays outstanding contributions in civil rights. Dr. King is listed as one of the members of the Public Review Advisory Commission that administers the scholarship.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, New York, NY

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
London, England, New York, NY, New York (NY)

This letter from Ms. Daves to Dr. King features requests regarding his itinerary for his trip to England.

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Flyer

This flyer from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which includes a quotation from Dr. King, encourages membership in the organization.

Letter from Barbara Meredith to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Barbara Meredith communicates with Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail. She does not understand why individuals professing to be Christians approve of segregation. Meredith offers her prayers to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy and others in the midst of the struggle to end segregation.

SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama

Tuesday, June 1, 1965
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Massachusetts (MA), Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), CANADA

Featured in this Western Christian Leadership Conference newsletter, is an article by Junius Griffin regarding the SCLC. "SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama," describes the reasons and the situations in which the SCLC had to "use the nonviolent economic campaign as an expression of moral indignation and an appeal to the nation's conscience."

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.