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Letter from Senator Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Senator Robert Kennedy thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence and expresses his aligned views regarding nonviolent reconciliation. Senator Kennedy believes in the preservation of dignity and freedom internationally without imposing "incessant military conflict" upon those with unaligned views. He references Dr. King's statement regarding the precedence of progress in America to that of other countries. He also wishes to hear Dr. King's reaction to a series of his speeches on "A Program for the Urban Crisis" that he has attached.

Letter from James Haughton to a Friend regarding Fundraising

Thursday, February 1, 1968

In this letter James Houghton, of the Committee for a Winter Confrontation with Congress, appeals to friends for financial support of the "poor peoples lobby."

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes James A. Froude's "Short Studies on Great Subjects."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Frank Elliott

Monday, February 4, 1963

Dora McDonald responded to Frank Elliott's letter regarding Dr. King's schedule. Additionally, She requested for Elliott to send out an annoucement to people who had been requesting Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

SCLC Initiative Invitation: Poor People's Campaign Committee

This recruitment letter is an invitation to volunteer for various committees to support the SCLC's Washington, D.C. initiative Poor People's Campaign. The committees cover areas from child care to fundraising and legal aid. The Campaign began in November 1967, but became bogged down due not only to Dr. King's assassination, but also that of Robert F. Kennedy's. The Campaign ceased operations in June 1968 but was resurrected in December, 2003.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Letter from Dr. Herman Klugman

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Dr. Herman Klugman, Dr. King's German-language tutor at Boston University, offers his congratulations on the coveted Nobel Peace Prize. He states that, as a Jew whose people experienced Nazi persecution, he has watched the "Gleichberechtigung" (equal rights) struggle with deep emotion.

Letter from Zelma Dodd to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968

Zelma Dodd sends Dr. King her best wishes along with two poems entitled, "The Soul of a Black Man," and "A Negro Soldier."

Letter from MLK to Kathy Sasso

Monday, April 27, 1964

Dr. King shares his pleasure in being named "Person of the Week" by Miss Sasso's class. He encloses a copy of one of his speeches.

Letter from Rabbi William Herskowitz to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Rabbi William Herskowitz, editor of The Jewish Horizon, asks Dr. King to read and write a review on the book, "Negro and Jew."

Letter from Silvio Conte to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Massachusetts Congressman Silvio Conte thanks Dr. King for a previous telegram sent to him regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act. Conte highlights his longtime support of the Civil Rights Movement and pledges his efforts to assist in passing this historic legislation.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. James Bevel

Dr. King informs Rev. Bevel of an urgent meeting with the Action Committee for Washington Mobilization at Paschal's Motel.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Letter from Judy Richardson to Mrs. King

Thursday, September 30, 1965

In this letter, Judy Richardson of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee asks Mrs. King to help them revise a second edition of the "Negro History Primer."

Letter from the TATTLER Staff to MLK

Tuesday, November 10, 1964

The TATTLER staff at Atlanta's Drexel Catholic High School congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Rev. Parker

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Rev. Ralph Abernathy, President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, received this correspondence following the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter, Rev. Richard Parker of the St. Cross Episcopal Church in California, highlighted his interest in a television interview of Mrs. King, shown on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

The Freedom Movement and the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 1, 1967

In this reprint of an article originally printed in the fall of 1965, Professor Robert S. Browne makes a charge to the Department of Defense that the Negro troops were being used in Vietnam in disproportionate numbers. Freedomsways publications re-released the publication due to its remarkably fresh and informative content and high demand.

SCLC Annual Meeting Program

Tuesday, September 25, 1962

This program outlines an annual meeting for the SCLC. The guest list includes Hall of Fame player Jackie Robinson, Septima Clark and Joseph E. Lowery.

Letter from Michelle Feinberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 6, 1963

Michelle Feinberg, a student in a special education class, writes Dr. King a letter about what she has been learning. She also asks Dr. King to send her a letter and a picture for their school.

Letter from Rosa Lockett Reodus to MLK

Sunday, January 30, 1966

Reodus invites Dr. King to speak at the Progressive Community Church in Chicago and offers a small donation from the church in support of his cause.

Telegram from Georgiana Hardy to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Georgiana Hardy, president of the Los Angeles City Board of Education, requests a meeting with Dr. King's upon his upcoming visit to California.

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Richard Russell

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King conveys his well wishes to Mr. Russell for a speedy recovery.

Confidential Memorandum

This handwritten document outlines plans for the SCLC's Direct Action program. The program will target Birmingham, Alabama, Montgomery, Alabama and Danville, Virginia.

Telegram from Tuskegee Students and Teachers to the SCLC

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Teachers and students from Tuskegee write members of the SCLC to express their support for the upcoming mobilization and Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from J. E. Hale to MLK

In this letter Hale criticizes Dr. King for being seen with Ertha Kitt asserting that Dr. King likes any type of publicity.

Letter from Danny Cupit to MLK

In this letter, Danny Cupit writes to Dr. King and expresses his joy in reading one of Dr. King's books. He also acknowledges the pleasure of meeting Dr. and Mrs. King after a speech, given by Senator Kennedy.

Telegram From the National Committee For Free Elections to MLK Regarding 1967 Sunflower County, Mississippi Elections

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General William Ramsey Clark, to discuss the need for federal voting registrars to oversee upcoming elections in rural Mississippi counties. In these elections, Negroes will run as candidates for the first time in American history.

Letter from Joan Daves to Marcel Bernfeld Regarding Letter "The Birmingham City Jail"

Friday, July 3, 1964

In this Letter, Joan Daves informs Marcel Bernfield that he may not have the permission to use Dr. King's Letter from The Birmingham City Jail for African universities and French students because of conflicts it may cause with rights.