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Sacrifice

Dr. King explains that Isaiah 1:11 means God can’t be appeased by sacrifice but demands righteous living.

Telegram from Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Mr. Spock invites Dr. King to send a representative to a discussion on the upcoming Washington Vietnam Mobilization.

Telegram from Newcastle University to MLK

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
UNITED KINGDOM

The registrar of Newcastle University inquires if Dr. King would be able to accept an honorary degree from the institute.

Cardinal Virtues

Dr. King defines "cardinal virtues" and then lists those held by the Greeks and Christians.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to Thomas R. Jones

Monday, July 29, 1963
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King thanks the Honorable Thomas R. Jones for his financial and moral support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

John Scotus Eriugena

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Scotus Eriugena.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to the President of the SCLC, addresses Attorney General Eugene Cook regarding a conversation that was agreed to be private. Despite this agreement, the conversation was publicized to United Press International. Mr. Walker expresses his frustration and announces his next steps to the Attorney General.

Antagonistic Letter

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Abraham Lincoln is referenced in this negative message.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

ISRAEL

The author objects to Dr. King's journey to Jerusalem with his followers. He also expresses his perception of the Negro race.

Letter from James Shaffer and James Barfield

Friday, July 29, 1966
Missouri (MO)

Mr. Shaffer and Mr. Barfield both thank Dr. King and the SCLC for thier works for humanity.

Letter from Edward Rutledge and Jack Wood to Robert Weaver

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Edward Rutledge and Jack E. Wood Jr. represent the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Center for Fair Housing. They expound on housing, planning policies, and programs for New York City. In addition, they affirm their belief that policy-makers should include and reflect the concerns of the minority.

Letter from MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

This is a copy of the response letter dated February 9, 1968. It is addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, EGYPT, HUNGARY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, NETHERLANDS, FRANCE, INDONESIA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, Washington (WA), CANADA, Colorado (CO), New Hampshire (NH), Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, January 24, 1968
New York, NY

Cass Canfield informs Dr. King that his company, Harper & Row Publishers Inc., won't publish Dr. Benjamin E Mays' book of memoirs.

Letter from W. E. Charlton to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, South Dakota (SD)

W. E. Charlton of the Curtis Publishing Company informs Dr. King of suspicious Saturday Evening Post order subscriptions under his name to different addresses. Charlton explains that they have cancelled the subscriptions and request that he ignore any billing until the fix is complete. Charlton encloses the fraudulent subscription order forms.

Letter from Ms. Dora Byron of Emory University to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Ms. Byron of Emory University's Community Educational Service requests for Dr. King to appear on a new campus public service television program entitled "Profile."

Contradiction

Dr. King writes a quote expressing the bounds of consciously living in contradiction.

Letter from MLK to Theodore W. Kheel

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

Dr. King graciously declines attorney and noted labor mediator Theodore Kheel's invitation to sit on the Dais at the International Longshoremen's 50th Anniversary Dinner due to a previous commitment in Berlin, Germany.

Congratulatory Letter from YWCA to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The YWCA congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Mrs. Ray Mitchell to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Ray Mitchell constructs this thoughtful letter to Dr. King thanking him not only for sending her a copy of his book, "Strength to Love," but also for his diligence as a clergyman.

Letter from Melis Nicolaides to MLK

Friday, April 30, 1965
GREECE, Montgomery, AL

Melis Nicolaides invites Dr. King to participate in the Third Marathon Peace March in Athens, Greece. At the first Peace March, only one person completed the march and that person was killed the following year. The next year "thousands of Greek people marched in the footsteps" of the murdered individual. Nicolaides explains that Dr. King's participation will be "an important contribution to the cause of peace."

Meet the Press Interview with Roy Wilkins and MLK

Sunday, August 25, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, POLAND, CUBA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This document is a transcript of NBC’s “Meet the Press” televised press conference with Dr. King and Roy Wilkins. The program is moderated by Ned Brooks. Frank Van Der Linden, Robert MacNeil, Richard Wilson, and Lawrence Spivak are panelists. Some of the topics covered are the goals of the March on Washington, a concern about whether the Civil Rights Movement is pushing too hard, and past political affiliations of Bayard Rustin.

Freedom

Here, Dr. King defines freedom.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964
Chicago, IL, St. Augustine, FL, Baltimore, MD

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

Birthday Card from Leola Whitted to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

Leola Whitted, a member of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Indiana (IN)

Dr. Kings thanks Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton for her and Mr. James Peterson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King shortly after President Kennedy's assassination to urge him to take precautions.