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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Letter from MLK to Yves Choliere

Friday, July 2, 1965

Dr. King informs Yves Choliere that he is unable to participate in the World Peace Congress in Helsinki, Finland in July of 1965. King explains that he and Reverend Abernathy are very busy with voter registration throughout the American South.

An Evaluation of the Racial Problems of Chicago

The writer of this document examines the intended efforts of Dr. King and the SCLC in addressing the issues of poor urban conditions, unemployment, unequal education and lack of Negro political involvement in the City of Chicago.

Messianic Hope

Dr. King writes these notes on "Messianic Hope" from Isaiah 11:6 and 11:8. He quotes Ludwig Feuerbach, a German philosopher, from his work "The Essence of Religion."

Letter form Gloria Kenny to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

Gloria Kenny praises Dr. King and the SCLC for sending a small group of individuals to the Agape Mass at MaryMount College. She also commends him on his efforts to speak out against the Vietnam War.

Mysticism

Dr. King cites Psalms 17:15, surmising that the vision of God is a mystical union with God.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Letter from Ragnar Forbech to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Ragnar Forbech, Chairman of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation (IFOR), responds to a previous letter from Dr. King. Dr. King declined the invitation to speak at the IFOR Conference due to of his busy schedule, but Forbech notes from their earlier correspondence that Dr. King will keep his organization in mind for the future. Forbech also congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Committee on Racial Justice

Sunday, February 11, 1968

In this letter, the Committee on Racial Justice provides update on their activities and encouragement.

Letter from Evert Svensson to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

Evert Svensson invites Dr. King to speak before the Christian Social Democrats Movement in Gotesborg, Sweden.

Telegram from MLK to Clarence T. Lundquist

Thursday, March 15, 1962

Dr. King writes Clarence Lundquist of the Wage, Hour and Public Contracts Division of the Department of Labor to request an investigation into complaints of wage discrimination at the Sea Pak Shrimp factories in Elonia and St. Simon's Island, Georgia.

Letter from French Organization Regarding American Outreach

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

This letter, dated January 23,1968, was sent among French colleagues who are in support of promoting understanding and cooperation between Protestant and Catholic educationists in America and France.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Monday, April 8, 1968

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Friedman

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

In this letter Ms. Dora McDonald informs Mr. Friedman of the University of Oregon that Dr. King's schedule will not allow for a contribution to "Forensic Quarterly". Such regrets were increasingly frequent occurrences as Dr. King’s prominence and workload grew.

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Stride Toward Freedom"

This statement from Victor Gollancz, Ltd. details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom",for the six-month period ending 9/29/66.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Proposal to Save War-Burned and War-Injured Vietnamese Children

The Committee of Responsibility sponsors an initiative to transport children from deplorable hospitals in Vietnam to the U.S. Plans also include enlisting help from governmental agencies, as well as collecting funds and support from the American people.

"God's Judgment on Western Civilization"

The document contains notes for a sermon given by Dr. King entitled, "God's Judgement on Western Civilization."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. W. A. Visser't Hooft

Monday, December 20, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Hooft confirming that Dr. King accepts his invitation to speak in Geneva. McDonald inquires about expenses for Dr. King and one of his aids and encloses a photograph and biography for Dr. Hooft to utilize.

A Call To Action-Lucis Trust

Lucis Trust wrote this "Call To Action" about the vast greivances that were occuring in America, as it related to the issue of race. He identified that African Americans were "condemned to an inferior way of life and excluded as a human being." Trust conveyed that a remedy must be provided for the ongoing injustice. The remedy he proposed is that the attitudes of White Americans needed to change, not only on a non-discriminitory basis, but by creating an atmosphere of inclusivism and goodwill.

MLK's Sermon Outline

Dr. King categorizes different types of Christians.

"Insight and Outlook..Negro Road to Power"

In this article, Joseph Kraft discusses the influences of Blacks voting.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ivor M. Liss

Friday, April 19, 1963

Dora McDonald thanks Ivor M. Liss for his contribution, and informs him that Dr. King will be in contact upon his return from Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bent Ostergaard

Wednesday, October 20, 1965

Miss McDonald informs Mr. Ostergaard that Dr. King is unable to accept his recent invitation to visit Copenhagen.

Letter from Huub A. J. Coppens to MLK

Friday, September 18, 1964

Huub, A. J. Coppens, Foreign Secretary of the "De Tribune," reminds Dr. King that they are waiting for a response to their invitation.

Race Role Urged For Girl Scouts

Saturday, February 3, 1962

De. Harold Taylor, former president of Sarah Lawrence College, challenges the Girl Scouts of America to play a greater role in fighting racism in the South. He also suggest that the Girl Scouts work with the Peace Corps to help spread their teachings internationally.

Letter to MLK from Rev. L.C. Coleman

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Rev. Coleman, of Marks, Mississippi addresses Dr. King, as the recipient of this correspondence. This letter asks for Dr. King to visit the town of Marks and participate in a Citizenship Class. It, also, notes that Rev. Coleman is running for a town elected position, known as "Road Supervisor."

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.