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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Worship

Dr. King critiques the Protestant Church worship services.

Showdown for Nonviolence

Tuesday, April 16, 1968
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King discusses the rationale and strategy for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. He explains that the SCLC hopes to avoid a national holocaust by promoting massive nonviolent demonstrations.

Letter from Roselyn Silverman to Dora McDonald

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Minnesota (MN)

Roselyn Silverman sends Dora McDonald a letter, with enclosed memorandum, in regards to a tentative itinerary for Dr. King's upcoming lecture.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963
Oklahoma (OK), Washington, D.C.

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Chicago, IL

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Letter from MLK to Dr. William H. Allen regarding kind letter

Tuesday, October 15, 1968
New York, NY

Dr. King sent this thank you letter to Dr. William Allen for the prayers and well wishes expressed to Dr. King, as he recovered from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem in 1958. He also conveyed to Dr. Allen that he had been making great progress in his health and anticipated rejoining those working hard in the fight for equality.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), New York, NY

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962
South Africa, CANADA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), London, England, GHANA, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.

Iroquois Brewery-A Report from the President

In this document, Terry Fox, President of Iroquois Brewery, issued a report informing the public that their company implemented a "Learn-And-Earn Program. The program offered young people in Buffalo, New York temporary summer jobs, in an effort to train future adult workers. Unfortunately, there is no listed year, for the beginning of the program, highlighted in the document.

MLK's Newsweek Statement

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King issues a statement on the defeat of a federal agency that would have allowed an African American to obtain a cabinet position within the national government.

Letter from MLK to Roberta Evans

Thursday, August 23, 1962
Cincinnati, OH

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Evans for her kind gesture in sending a letter enclosed with a book by Will Campbell. Dr. King believes his views on race will be a benefit to him.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Monday, June 22, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN)

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Goldwin

Wednesday, March 20, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Robert A. Goldwin the four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation" have been received and placed on Dr. King's desk for him to read upon his return from out of town.

Letter from Joan Daves to Stuart Harris Concerning bill from Waldorf-Astoria

Monday, July 20, 1964
New York, NY

This letter is in reference to a bill from the Waldorf Astoria for expenses due to Dr. and Mrs. King's stay, allowing Dr.King to be available for the Today Show and the World at Ten program.

Victor Capron Requests MLK Deliver Condolences to Lt. Col. Odumeguu Ojukuu

Thursday, March 14, 1968
BELGIUM

Capron requests that Dr. King deliver a personal message of condolence to the President of Biafra, Lt. Col. Odumegwu Ojukwu. MLK's trip to Biafra in March of 1968 was canceled.

Letter from John F. Steinman to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

John F. Steinman commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership and encloses a check for the SCLC and SCLF.

March on Washington

Sunday, April 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Little Rock, AR, North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), New York, NY, Missouri (MO)

In this news release, Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, addresses Congress to voice the people's concern in their quest for freedom, jobs and equal rights. He commends Republicans and Democrats in support of legislation to end discrimination.

Postcard Addressed to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968
New York (NY)

Father Martin Genghty of New York issued this postcard to Rev. Ralph Abernathy following Dr. King's assassination. The holy leader referred to Rev. Abernathy as "the Good Shepherd for his flock."

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
New York, NY

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the German edition of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", published by Econ Verlag, for the period 1/1/65 to 12/31/65.

Letter from "A Red Blooded American Who Is Opposed to Your Tactics of Un-Americanism"

Thursday, April 27, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Texas (TX)

This letter to Dr. King criticizes his presumed anti-American activities. The author, who signs as "A Red Blooded American who is opposed to your tactics of un-Americanism," describes herself as the mother and grandmother of men who have served in the armed forces.

1966 Notes on the War

CUBA, VIETNAM, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

Trinity

Dr. King quotes a sermon by Bernard of Clairvaux

Telegram from Elizabeth J. Miller to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Birmingham, AL

Elizabeth Miller, the Executive Director of the Christian Social Concern division of the American Baptist Convention, extends support to Dr. King while he is in the Jefferson County Jail in 1967. She expresses gratitude for Dr. King's leadership and commends him for his non-violent action.

The Importance of Voting

Thursday, September 6, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

This transcript documents Dr. King's recorded statement intended to raise awareness of voting and voter registration.

Letter from Frank S. Gotshall to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
Maryland (MD)

Frank S. Gotshall compliments Dr. King's as a "fine champion," but he asserts that the problem of race relations in America is worsening. To prevent race mixing, Gotshall proposes that each race be given its own area in which it can live.

Letter from Rose Mary to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Chicago, IL

Seventh grader Rose Mary writes to Dr. King commending his efforts concerning "racial problems" and informing him of her admiration.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

Law Suit Against Wrens Nest

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Georgia (GA)

This letter from Mrs. A. L. Wilkinson to a lawyer, is urging this person to help a man to win his case against tha Association responsible for keeping Negroes from entering the Wren's Nest in Atlanta.