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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Letter from MLK to Ernest McCullough

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
CANADA, Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, Illinois (IL), Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the University of Toronto Progressive Conservative Association.

Letter from Representative Thomas G. Morris to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

New Mexico Congressman Thomas Morris writes Dr. King to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram requesting Morris' opposition to House Bill 585, which would dismiss five recently elected members. Morris does not indicate his position in the matter.

Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Michigan (MI)

In this response letter to Hugh Daugherty, Dr. King extends his deep appreciation for contributions made to the SCLC. The reverend also apologizes for the delay in response.

Letter from Nathaniel L. Hawthorne to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

Nathaniel Lee Hawthorne, who describes himself as “a nonviolent militant Negro” from rural Virginia, asks Dr. King for advice on publishing a book. Hawthorne wants to tell the nation what it feels like to be poor

Program for SCLC Annual Freedom Banquet

Monday, August 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA)

This program from SCLC's Tenth Annual Freedom Banquet features Senator Edward M. Kennedy as guest speaker.

Letter from William W. Stafford to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

William Stafford expresses admiration, gratitude and support for Dr. King's work with the Civil Rights Movement and his stand against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Miss Rankin at the US Justice Department

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald sends Miss Rankin of the Justice Department a copy of a statement made by Dr. King before the Republican Party. The statement was in reference to his proposed "Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged."

Letter from Vincenzo Lapiccirella to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965
Birmingham, AL, ITALY

Vincenzo Lapiccirella invites Dr. King to a symposium for philosophers, cardiologists, and theologians. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the relation of health illnesses to psychological and emotional state. The symposium will be sponsored by the mayor of Florence and the Scientific Carlo Erba Foundation of Milan. Lapiccirella hopes Dr. King will be able attend this grand event.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Advance

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses advance payment from Harper & Row for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from the National Committee To Combat Nazism to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Chicago, IL, Louisville, KY

Rabbi S. Burr Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, sends Dr. King a resolution on civil rights that was passed at their fourth annual conference in Chicago. The resolution formally announces the organization's support of the Civil Rights Movement.

Invitation from President Kennedy to MLK

Washington, D.C.

The President of the United States invites Dr. King to attend a luncheon at the White House.

Art

Dr. King describes art as "alleviating the ills of life."

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

Wednesday, April 25, 1962
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

The Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

This program commemorates the inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster as the seventh president of Morehouse College.

Ritschl, Albrecht

Berlin, Germany

Dr. King provides a biographical sketch of German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

Michigan (MI), VIETNAM

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

"Mrs. Julia Brown To Speak Here On Martin Luther King"

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Virginia (VA)

This article discusses former FBI undercover agent, Julia Brown's plan to expose Dr. King of his affiliation with the Communist party.

SCLC Staff Assignments

Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

This document contains a list of specific assignments for the individuals of the SCLC staff.

SCLC News Release - MLK Statement on Continued Racial Violence in Alabama

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This 1966 SCLC news release contains a statement from Dr. King concerning further racial violence in Birmingham, Alabama and the need for prompt action.

Sin

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical book of Leviticus regarding the topic of sin.

Power Black or White and Christian Conscience

Monday, August 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document is an enclosure that belongs with a letter from Gayrund Wilmore, Isaiah Pogue, Leroy Patrick, Elder Hawkins, and Bryant George to MLK. The writers seek to raise the conscientiousness of Christians in both the black and white communities, and address an existing dilemma between race and power with the hope of bringing about reconciliation.

God

Dr. King records his thoughts on the book of Deuteronomy to illustrate the oneness of God.

Letter from Claude Leman to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965
CANADA

Claude Leman, Chairman of the University Model United Nations, invites Dr. King to speak at a Model United Nations Seminar in Montreal, Canada.

Speeches by the Leaders

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISRAEL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, Boston, MA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, California (CA), Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Maine (ME), South Carolina (SC), New Hampshire (NH), Colorado (CO), Tennessee (TN)

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

An Ambitious Dream Confronts Reality

Wednesday, June 23, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King talks about the Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE) as well as the political changes that have occurred in Georgia.

Letter from MLK to Shinichi Oshima

Monday, July 27, 1964
JAPAN

Dr. King writes Shinichi Oshima acknowledging his letter "of recent date." King thanks him for his encouraging words and ends the letter with an inspirational tone.

Excerpt from The Drum Major Instinct

This passage quotes one of Dr. King's acclaimed sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia. He defines the desire to lead as "the Drum Major instinct." Seeing himself as a Drum Major for justice, peace, and righteousness, Dr. King posits what should be said at his funeral.

Letter from MLK to Mr. W David Angus

Wednesday, February 12, 1964
CANADA

Dr. King is responding to the invitation given by W. David Angus. He regrettably informs Angus that due to his overcrowded schedule, he is unable to speak in Montreal. He suggests Reverend Ralph Abernathy as a more than adequate alternative to speak.

"Ideal Traits"

SWEDEN

In this article, the author confronts Dr. King's statement regarding Scandinavian countries. The author suggests that Dr. King does not have a full understanding of the culture and proceeds to enlighten him.

Moral Law

Dr. King documents a statement from the Federal Council of Churches concerning the significance of moral law. King writes, "This statement from the Federal Council of Churches is pertinent."