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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Truth

Dr. King quotes Marcus Tullius Cicero’s “De Natura Deorum,” providing references from William Wallace’s “The Logic of Hegel.”

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Letter to A.C. Skinner from Rev. Abernathy

Monday, January 9, 1967

Rev. Abernathy writes to inform Mr. Skinner of the crucial financial situation the SCLC is facing due to decreased contributor support after the "Black Power cry." He is asking the International Union of Mine Mill and Smelter Workers for a generous monetary contribution within the coming weeks.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

Sin (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s “Normative Psychology of Religion.”

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

Letter from Edna R. McKinnon to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967

Edna McKinnon praises Dr. King for his wonderful work with the SCLC and its effect on the "entire world." She agrees with Dr. King's nonviolent philosophy and approach to American military intervention in Vietnam. Ms. McKinnon is the sister of Jeanette Rankin, the first woman of Congress, and the only member to vote against U.S. entry into both world wars.

Letter from the Interpreters' House to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Carlyle Marney and J. C. Herrin invite Dr. King to attend a conference to discuss the future mission and tasks for American Baptists in the South.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

Letter from the University of Capetown to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson asks if Dr. King can deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

Report of the Insurgent Editor's Conference

These minutes of the "Insurgent Newspaper Editor's Conference" record the events of the conference from start to finish. The minutes also describe prominent topics of the conference, including the difficulties publishing an insurgent newspaper on a tight budget, reaching a large audience, and generating powerful content. The minutes end on a positive note: "a good time was had by all."

Plea for the Poor to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Signing as "A Poor Person," this author urges Dr. King to remember that poverty transcends race. The author requests that Dr. King help the poor of all races, with an emphasis on promoting voter registration for all poor people.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Toynbee: List of Twenty-One Societies

Dr. King notes the twenty-one civilizations described in Arnold Toynbee's "A Study of History."

Letter from Imogene Cashmore to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Imogene Cashmore responds to Senator Dodd's recent statement in Congress about Moise Tshombe, a Congo politician who had recently been jailed on charges of treason. Cashmore condemns Senators Robert and Ted Kennedy for not trying to help Tshombe, questioning why there has been no negative response to the current government of Congo, which Cashmore charges is rampant with "mass murder and violation of civil rights."

"Negro Leader Looks Down Road Ahead"

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Augusta Chronicle wrote this extensive review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this document, the review places special emphasis on Dr. King's views on the War on Poverty, the Black Power Movement and the state of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Arnold Krakower to MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Attorney Arnold Krakower explains to Dr. King the reasons why he must reject a financial appeal to aid the SCLC. According to Krakower, Dr. King's position in the civil rights movement gave him high notoriety. However, once Dr. King turned his attention to oppose the war in Vietnam, Krakower believes he has no choice but to object mixing civil rights and foreign policy.

Invitation from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Edwin Tuller requests Dr. King show special attention to the invitation from the European Baptist Federation. Mr. Tuller is certain that Dr. King's presence in Europe at this time would be "extremely beneficial" with the progression of "racial brotherhood."

Man: Sinner

Referencing Psalms 14:3, Dr. King discusses the completeness of sin in relationship to man.

MLK - Notes on "Highest Value"

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's focus on the concept of "highest value" in its various iterations.

Letter from Everett McKinley Dirksen to MLK

Monday, July 6, 1964

Everett M. Dirksen expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter and informs him of the satisfaction he received in being an asset in solidifying the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Dr. Spock Joins King in March

Pediatrician and anti-war activist Dr. Benjamin Spock and Dr. King lead thousands of individuals throughout the streets of Chicago in objection to the Vietnam War. Both Dr. King and Dr. Spock express their dissatisfaction with President Johnson's focus on Vietnam rather than the war on poverty.

Restorationism

Dr. King defines restorationism.

Letter from Edward J. Warren to Senator Jacob K Javits

Friday, March 16, 1962

Mr. Warren writes to Senator Javits to confirm receipt of a previous correspondence. He expresses gratitude for Javits position on Human Rights.

ABC Letter re Issues and Answers

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Peggy Whedon, producer of ABC's "Issues and Answers" program, expresses disappointment that Dr. King may not appear on the show the coming weekend because of a strike.

Lawler Daniels Thanks MLK

Monday, July 10, 1967

Lawler P. Daniels, Jr., President of Sleinad Enterprises, Inc., expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's invitation to the SCLC 10th Annual Convention.

Letter from MLK to Hugh W. Nevin Jr.

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Hugh Nevin's letter inviting him to speak at St. George's School. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to his full calendar and thanks Mr. Nevin for his nice words regarding his book, "Stride Towards Freedom."

Telegram from Oslo, Norway to Dora McDonald

Thursday, November 5, 1964

Dr. King receives this telegram as an advance welcome to Oslo, Norway and to confirm lodging reservations for him and his associates.