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Dr. King quotes Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy's book "What I Believe." Tolstoy asserts that when he came to believe in Christ's teachings his whole life and perception changed.

Telegram from St. James Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958
Detroit, MI, New York (NY)

Rev. W.C. Barnett, pastor of St. James Baptist Church, sent this telegram expressing well wishes, from his congregation, towards Dr. King.

MLK Address at the National Biennial Convention

Wednesday, May 14, 1958
Florida (FL), INDIA, INDONESIA, BURMA / MYANMAR, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King delivers this speech at the National Biennial Convention of the American Jewish Congress. The convention took place May 1, 1958 in Miami Beach, Florida. Dr. King discusses how the Jewish and Negro communities are unified by the escape of bondage. They share a common fight against the deadly enemies of oppression. He continues on to discuss the things that need to be done in order for African Americans to reach great potential along with the importance of fighting for and obtaining democracy.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Payments from England

Wednesday, December 2, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Literary agent Joan Daves provides Dr. King with detailed figures of royalties from an anthology containing his work and the British edition of "Stride Toward Freedom."

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Wednesday, November 14, 1956
Montgomery, AL

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding the Montgomery Bus Boycotts. The Supreme Court rendered a decision making separate but equal unconstitutional. Dr. King states that the next course of action that should be taken is the implementation of this noble decision and the end of the long night of enforced segregation.

Victor Capron Requests MLK Deliver Condolences to Lt. Col. Odumeguu Ojukuu

Thursday, March 14, 1968
BELGIUM

Capron requests that Dr. King deliver a personal message of condolence to the President of Biafra, Lt. Col. Odumegwu Ojukwu. MLK's trip to Biafra in March of 1968 was canceled.

Liberalism

Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Little Rock, AR, Montgomery, AL, Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA, Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

Invitation to Harry Belafonte Concert

Friday, May 25, 1962
Johannesburg, South Africa, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King invites friends to a Harry Belafonte concert, which is a benefit performance for the SCLC.

Letter from M. A. Cross to Marie Goldner

Tuesday, October 1, 1963
Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA)

M. A. Cross, Director of Public and Industrial Relations at Dan River Mills, Inc., informs Mrs. Goldner that Dan River Mills, Inc. does not discriminate against Negroes.

MLK Requests Contributions

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King writes this fundraising letter on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He explains the campaigns taking place in Washington for the poor and urges immediate financial support for the struggle.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Seating List for Pacem In Terris II

Geneva, Switzerland

This document is an alphabetical seating list of participants for the Pacem In Terris II (Peace on Earth) Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland.

Letter from Alice Brainerd to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967
Denver, CO, Colorado (CO)

Ms. Brainerd criticizes the methods of Dr. King, asserting that "civil disobedience and non-cooperation" are not the best approach to take towards justice.

God (His Existence)

Dr. King quotes Alfred, Lord Tennyson's "The Ancient Sage" after posing the question, "Can we prove God's existence?"

Letter from William H. Gray, Jr. to Congressman James A. Byrne

Monday, June 5, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Prominent offical and businessman William H. Gray, Jr. writes United States Congressman James Byrne in regards to discrimination issues related to Negro students and the Selective Service System. Gray communicates with Congressman Byrne to intervene in a discriminatory matter involving a young Philadelphia native. Dr. King is forwarded a copy of this correspondence.

Telegram from Ebenezer Baptist Church to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Ebenezer Baptist Church offers support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Remarks by MLK at the Freedom House Annual Dinner

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX)

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for being honored by Freedom House. He also pays tribute to the life and work of John F. Kennedy while encourging others to honor his memory through their dedication to civil rights.

Mass Mailing from the Model Inner city Community Organization

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Washington, D.C.

This is a form letter from the Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy informing the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. about Dr. King's visit to help revitalize the area.

Notecard regarding freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's views on freedom, according to the book, "Human Nature and Conduct." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Vivian Washington to MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Hampshire (NH)

Vivian E. Washington requests that Dr. King, who is recovering in a Harlem Hospital, review her publication "Mount Ascutney" and provide her with feedback.

Letter from W. Ivan Hoy to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963
Florida (FL)

W. Ivan Hoy, on behalf of the University of Miami, invites Dr. King to be a guest lecturer for their Miami Religion Lecture Series.

Dr. Paul Arthur Scilpp Speech in Illinois

Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

In this address delivered before the National Assembly for Progress in Equality of Opportunity in Housing, Dr. Paul Arthur Schilpp speaks about equality between races, "pure" race, and voting rights for Negroes.

SCLC Resolution on Afro-American Unity

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this resolution approved at its Tenth Annual Convention, SCLC affirms the need for Afro-American unity. The organization commits to conduct regional unity conferences involving all sectors of the Negro community, hold Identity Workshops on history and culture, and develop economic and political power so that Negroes can own and control their own communities. The resolution concludes by affirming the importance of black spiritual power, economic power, and political power.

Letter from Henry Hart Rice to MLK

Monday, June 5, 1967
New York, NY

Henry Hart Rice sends Dr. King a contribution to express his support for the work of the SCLC.

WDIX: In Whose Interest Is Changing The Law?

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Orangeburg, SC

This editorial was broadcast on WDIX, a radio station based out of Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 20, 1968. The piece questions if President Johnson's actions in favor of civil rights were under the pressure of Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael, stating that the Great Society is an danger. The author further argues that the status of African Americans as been largely improved, just "not as quickly" as they would have hoped and that should be good enough.

Jesus Christ (Two Natures)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's notion of the "two natures of Christ." Reinhold Niebuhr was a scholastic mentor of Dr. King and was therefore cited in several of his theological works.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964
Philadelphia, PA

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

VIETNAM, New York (NY), New York, NY, Rhode Island (RI), FRANCE, CAMBODIA, LAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC, THAILAND, New Jersey (NJ), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, PHILIPPINES, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, HAITI, NICARAGUA

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."