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Dr. King references author Emil Carl Wilm's publication, "The Problem of Religion."

Letter from MLK to Robert D. Rasmussen

Monday, December 13, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes Robert Rasmussen to express his regret for his inability to attend a Leadership Conference with the officials of the American Baptist Convention at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Iowa (IA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Missouri (MO), Des Moines, IA

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Letter from Ralph H. Eaton to MLK

Friday, June 18, 1965
Arizona (AZ)

Ralph Eaton explains to Dr. King why he will no longer send contributions to the SCLC.

Letter from Arthur Kinoy to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

In this letter, Mr. Kinoy informs Dr. King of an article in Rutgers' Law Review, that contains Kinoy's and Bill Kunstler's ideas in civil rights litigation. Kinoy is a law professor at Rutgers The State University.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Letter from Dick Hall to MLK

Chicago, IL

Dick Hall, Group Leader with the Chicago area Salvation Army, writes Dr. King to inform him of a program the daycare center conducts that caters to children in the surrounding area. Mr. Hill also requests Dr. King's autograph for a project display the children in the program are constructing.

Letter from Elisabeth T. Babcock to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 25, 1965
New York (NY)

Elisabeth T. Babcock writes Dora McDonald regarding Dr. King's schedule around May 8, 1965. Babcock desires Dr. King to address high school students "in support of Long Island." Babcock states that maybe Dr. King can help the children display their courage.

Letter from Congressman Herman Toll to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA)

Pennsylvania Democratic Congressman Herman Toll thanks Dr. King for his letter and assures Dr. King that he will continue to seek strong civil rights legislation.

Letter from MLK to The Boston Globe

Friday, February 24, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King expresses gratitude to The Boston Globe for their generous contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Dave Dellinger to MLK

Saturday, April 8, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dave Dellinger outlines the events and requirements for the rally, sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, to be held in New York City, New York on April 15th, 1967.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

The Role of the Church


Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from John M. Thornton to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Cleveland, OH, Richmond, VA, Ohio (OH), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Alabama (AL), BRAZIL

John M. Thorton invites Dr. King to speak at the Citizenship Award Banquet hosted by the National Capital Voters Association, in order to encourage the 425,000 Negro citizens of Washington, DC to vote in the upcoming presidential election.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Sin

On this note card, Dr. King discusses the repercussions of sin according to Albrecht Ritschl.


Dr. King highlights a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's twelve-volume analysis of the rise and fall of civilizations, "A Study of History."

Letter from Margit Sahlin to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden

Margit Sahlin of the Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to a "symposium with prominent and interested Swedes" during his trip to Scandinavia.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, Connecticut (CT), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

Invitation to Ghana's Independence Celebration


Dr. and Mrs. King were the recipients of a series of invitations to attend celebratory ceremonies to celebrate the independence of Ghana.

Letter From William N. Goldsmith to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963
Georgia (GA), Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

William N. Goldsmith informs Dr. King of funds that were collected at Brandeis University for the SCLC. Mr. Goldsmith also apologizes for Dr. King having to bear so much of the load in Birmingham.

Invitation from Jesse Jackson to MLK to Attend an Operation Breadbasket Workshop

Saturday, February 11, 1967
Chicago, IL

Dr. King receives an invitation from Jesse Jackson to help with a fundraising project for SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from MLK to Yves Montand

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Montand of France, for his financial contribution as well as his personal support for the success of the movement in the United States.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inaugural Concert

Washington, D.C.

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to attend a concert celebrating the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. The concert features Mischa Elman, a Russian emigre and famed musician.


Dr. King quotes John Hodgdon Bradley from an article in the December 1932 Atlantic Monthly, “Letter from a Scientist to a Priest.”

People In Action: A Profound Moral..Continued

Saturday, August 3, 1963

Dr. King challenges the Negro church and its leadership to uphold the morals of the community. He insists that clergymen must speak out guardedly to obtain support.

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding a Japanese Edition

New York, NY

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, requests permission from Dr. King to proceed with the Japanese edition of his book "Strength to Love" per the terms outlined in her letter of April 13.

Letter from Unknown to MLK

This letter from an unknown author advises Dr. King to conduct the largest voter registration drive in an effort to elimate poverty. According to the author, "Politicians understand the ballot."

Letter from Roger Loewi to MLK

New York (NY)

Roger Loewi wrote this letter to inform Dr. King of his mutual friendship with King adviser, Stanley Levison. Lastly, Mr. Loewi requested for a brief meeting with Dr. King.

James Meredith Article

Mississippi (MS)

A newspaper article describes an argument that occurred between James Meredith and a group of black deacons in the city of Canton, Miss. The argument ultimately led to Meredith stating "I can understand why so many Negroes have been lynched."

Letter from Jefferson Poland to MLK

San Francisco, CA, Florida (FL)

Following the death of his grandfather, Jefferson Poland corresponds with Dr. King to share his belief in man's divinity. After a life of discrimination, Poland's grandfather, Ross Mullin, wrote a poem to Dr. King which criticized prejudice. This transformation after sixty years of hatred represents man's continuous growth.