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"SOUTH KOREA"

Letter from MLK to Pastor Summerville

Tuesday, November 9, 1965

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Pastor Summerville's efforts as translator for a speech he gave before a French audience in Paris.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Leon R. Martin

Monday, August 12, 1963

SCLC Director of Research and Information Harry Boyte communicates with Leon Martin to thank him for the thoughtful words made in response to Dr. King's article in "The New Leader." Boyte tells Martin that Negroes in America are at a place where they will no longer be forced to wait for equality. Boyte asserts that only the complete participation of Negroes in every part of life in America will "suffice at this juncture in history."

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King receives this letter from U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding his testimony outlining his position on civil rights before the House Judiciary Committee.

Follow Me

Dr. King outlines a sermon. "Follow Me" and "The Call of Christ" are considered as possible titles.

Religion

This document is a notecard titled "Religion," in which Dr. King expounds on John Dewey's definition of religion in "A Common Faith" as a "purely ethical meaning" of religion.

Letter from MLK to Lillian M. Robertson

Wednesday, July 31, 1963

Dr. King writes Lillian Robertson acknowledging receipt of her letter inviting him to speak at the annual meeting of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship in Atlantic City. The Reverend closes by stating it will be after the first of the year before he can make a definite commitment.

Brotherhood

Dr. King cites a quote that exemplifies the necessity of understanding human connection. Emphasizing brotherhood, he notes man's inherent dependence on others.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Notecard Regarding Freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his insights on the concept of freedom.

Telegram from Vice Chancellor Newcastle University to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

The Vice Chancellor of Newcastle University states that they "regretfully understand" Dr. King's inability to attend their engagement due to his current imprisonment.

Schleiermacher (What Is the Operation of Grace)

Dr. King records a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher's work "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Letter from Era Canon to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1961

Era Canon notifies Dr. King that her friend Doris Greene, whom recently passed, was very intrigued by his work. Mrs. Canon wants to contribute to Dr. King's organization with some of the finances Mrs. Greene has obtained upon her passing.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm to MLK about a Humanity Button

Friday, March 1, 1968

In this letter Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm enclose a button called the "Pentagon of Humanity," which the Heussenstamm's also sent to the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Accordingly the symbol represents “love, unity and wisdom—the community of man.”

Statement by Floyd McKissick

This is information sheet is about the National Director of CORE, Floyd McKissick's statement on the Vietnam's War. In addition to other topics, he is scheduled to discuss the immorality of the conflict by drawing "parallels between self determination for the people of Vietnam and the quest for equality for Black Americans."

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion" on temporal things so filling people's minds that they don't have room for the eternal. He contrasts this with pantheism. The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Letter from Arthur C. Walter to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Arthur Walter, Assistant Pastor at Park United Presbyterian Church, writes Dr. King regarding a boycott that will deny some African American children Christmas gifts. Walter inquires about how his church can use some of their funds to provide gifts for the children that will be affected by the boycott.

SCLC Mail Log: February 26, 1968

Monday, February 26, 1968

This is a one-day mail log for incoming mail addressed to Dr. King and other SCLC associates. As an organizational tactic, the log kept track of the high volume of correspondences that came through the office.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Letter from Topsy Eubanks to the SCLC

The Council of Christian Women Voters in Augusta, Georgia sends the SCLC a contribution and informs the organization of their desire to become an SCLC affiliate.

Letter From MLK to George Jones

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

This letter from Dr. King thanks George Jones of Joe Louis Milk Company for his "generous contribution" to the SCLC, and stresses the importance of such contributions towards the SCLC's work and mission.

Letter from J.W. Parnell to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Rev. J.W. Parnell writes Dr. King to request support for his "one man demonstration march." The demonstration, Parnell outlines, features a bicycle ride from Coney Island, New York to Long Beach, California, conjoined with prayer and a symbolic water ritual.

Telegram from MLK to Mr. Sylveter A. Okereke

Friday, August 6, 1965

Dr. King regrettably informs Mr. Okereke that he will be unable to accept his invitation for an event held on August 18, 1965.

MLK's Sermon Notes

Dr. King drafted the intro of this sermon to place emphasis on the pros and cons of despair. The place and date of where this sermon was preached is not known.

Letter from M. Rogers to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

M. Rogers objects to Dr. King's teachings and infers he should study the New Testament of the Bible. Mr. Rogers perceives that what Dr. King preaches causes "more resentment between the different races." He further elaborates on how he envisions the affects of "non-violence" and "civil disobedience."

Western Union Telegram from Barrington Dunbar to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

In this telegram, Barrington Dunbar of the peace and social committee from New York, informs Dr. King of the support from his religious society.

Letter from MLK to Stevens Bedding Warehouse

Thursday, August 6, 1964

Dr. King thanks the Stevens Bedding Warehouse of Cicero, Illinois for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He also explains the importance of contribution and how it will help in the fight for civil rights.

Community of Glenville, City of Cleveland,

This 1965 brochure from the Office of the City Planning Commission, Cleveland, OH, focuses on the "almost all-Negro community" of Glenville. In it the Commission discusses both its ability to assist the community and the responsibility of the community to engage in grass roots activities that would serve as a springboard for larger scale urban renewal. The overall message of the brochure is that for the City to provide assistance, the community will have to "begin at home".

Letter from George Richard to MLK

George Richard asks Dr. King for books on demonstrations, and he also asks Dr. King to visit his town.

Letter from MLK to Michael J. Quill

Thursday, August 24, 1961

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Michael J. Quill's dedication to the "front lines" during a libel case. Dr. King informs Mr. Quill of the current status of the case and the courts response. He further provides Mr. Quill with the operations in the south and their deep involvement in the "Freedom Ride."

Statement by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964

This document contains Dr. King's remarks on injustices in the state of Mississippi. He suggests a complete boycott if the federal or state government is unable to perform the proper means of justice.