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"SOUTH KOREA"

Letter from Samuel Aggrey Forson

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Samuel Aggrey Forson, President of the International Affairs Association of Legon, writes to convey condolences regarding the assassination of MLK., Jr.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

History

Dr. King cites Reinhold Niebuhr's definition of history and its relation to God.

Letter From Maria Diego to Dr. King

Thursday, November 18, 1965

Maria Diego requests assistance from Dr. King to aid in funding a new Catholic school building in Japan.

March on Washington Transportation Information

This is a form sent to each organization participating in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, requiring information regarding transportation arrangements.

Letter from M.W. Espy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

This letter is requesting that Dr. King sign the First Day Cover of the twenty cent postage stamp honoring Gen. George C. Marshall. It is also noted that two other Nobel Peace Prize winners have signed the Cover as well.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mamie Reese

Monday, January 22, 1968

Dr. King's assistant writes Mamie Reese to applaud Eartha Kitt's courage in speaking up about what she believes is the cause of “restlessness” and crime in the streets. Kitt spoke out against the Vietnam War at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, the First Lady.

Chicago Freedom Movement on Open City Reform

The Chicago Freedom Movement requests that the city's mayor equally enforces the Chicago Fair Housing Ordinace.

Letter to MLK Regarding Opposing Views

Friday, August 18, 1967

The author of this letter expresses opposition towards Dr. King's civil disobedience methodologies, believing that civil disobedience is "contrary to God."

Letter from Tommy Wilkins to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 28, 1962

Tommy Wilkins writes Dora McDonald to inquire about a book loaned to Dr. King during his attendance at Emory University. Wilkins then requests its return and extends his best wishes to the SCLC for their work in Albany.

Index Card Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Metaphysics

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Bishop McConnell's views on Metaphysics, according to the book, "Is God Limited."

Letter from MLK to Frank Jones

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dr. King writes Rev. Jones of Greater Piney Grove Baptist Church in Atlanta to acknowledge receipt of his contribution to the Albany Movement. Dr. King informs Rev. Jones that his check will be forwarded to Dr. William G. Anderson, founder of the Albany Movement, to assist in the work of the desegregation alliance.

Letter from Marion Dockhorn to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, April 16, 1962

Marion Dockhorn invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 5th Annual Bucks County World Peace Fair. Dockhorn believes that Dr. King's attendance will boost support for the civil rights movement by providing a place to "spread [the] message."

MLK to Ozie Vincent at Chicago's WBEE

Dr. King apologizes to Mr. Vincent for not being able to tape five messages for his program in the month of December.

Letter from Daniel Glantz to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

This letter is from Daniel Glantz of Sweden. Glantz wrote the letter because he was ordered to do so by beings from outer space. According to Glantz the space beings look like angels and the angels would like to meet with Dr. King, whose mission they morally support. Glantz ends his letter by asking Dr. King if he recognizes the cosmic symbol, which is in the upper left-hand corner of the document and appears as a red circle with a white cross topped by a green triangle or pyramid.

The Crisis in America's Cities

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Dr. King provides an analysis of "social disorder" and a plan of action against poverty, discrimination and racism in Urban America. Dr. King states that, "If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed."

Letter from Donald Louis Anderson to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1962

Donald Louis Anderson, member of the Democratic Party in Pittsburgh, writes to Dr. King to request his endorsement of their political movement in the South.

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Birthday Card from Isaac Stotts to MLK

Isaac Stotts sends birthday wishes to Dr. King on his 39th birthday.

On Being A Good Neighbor

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Advance

Monday, December 19, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe encloses advance payment from Harper & Row for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harold E. Carlson

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend Carlson to thank him for his recent telegram of encouragement and support. Dr. King states, "You may be confident that such reassurance provides us with an additional source of strength." Dr. King also discusses the philosophy of the SCLC.

Why We Can't Wait Book Cover

This draft of Why We Can't Wait contains sketches of a cover, table of contents and edits of the brief description.

Habakkuk

This note card contains Dr. King's notes on the Old Testament book of Habakkuk.

Excerpts of Letters Written About Vietnam War

This document includes excerpts from letters written by Mary Agnes Blonien, sister of an American nurse at the Minh Quy Hospital at Kontum, South Vietnam. Moved to the point of tears, the nurse shares her thoughts and gives a vivid account of the war conditions in Vietnam, and expresses empathy for both Americans and Vietnamese.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

Letter from Thomas Wilkins to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Thomas Wilkins suggests that Dr. King consider pursuing an initiative against taxation in Alabama. He proposes that any Negro who is refused voter registration should not pay any taxes in the state.

Outline on Aristotle

In this outline, Dr. King documents elements of Aristotelian philosophy which deal with ethics and metaphysics. The outline includes a brief biography which chronicles Aristotle's life and a reference to his well known work "Nicomachean Ethics."

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."