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"SOUTH KOREA"

Telephone Log: January 22

Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

This memo from the desk of Dr. King includes several missed telephone calls noted for his later response.

Southern Christian Leadership Rally Souvenir Program

Friday, October 18, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Boston, MA, Indiana (IN)

This is the 1963 Souvenir Program for the Southern Christian Leadership Rally, an initiative of the citizens civic planning committee. Dr. King is honored as an audacious leader.

Letter from Charles and Leslie Gray to MLK about Contribution

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

In this letter, the Grays send an enclosed contribution to Dr. King in support of his "approach in the civil rights movement."

Fichte on God

Dr. King references Kantian protege Johann Gottlieb Fichte and philosophically defines God as the "moral order of the universe."

Letter of Holy Land Trip Postponement from MLK to Sandy F. Ray

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
New York (NY), GREECE, ISRAEL

In this retained copy of his letter to Sandy Ray of Concreta Tours, Dr. King postpones his planned tour of the Holy Land. Dr. King suggests observing the escalating conflict there, along with the strife in Greece, before revisiting further plans for trips to those areas.

Gray Power

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This sketch was originally sent to Dr. King from John McClellan along with a letter that titled the sketch, "Gray Power."

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., GERMANY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, North Carolina (NC), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH)

Miss McDonald writes Dr. King regarding his recent mail and messages. Included are numerous invitations and missed telephone calls.

Letter from Joseph M. Hendricks to MLK

Monday, September 10, 1962
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Joseph M. Hendricks writes Dr. King requesting a copy of the speech Dr. King gave at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Letter from Howard W. Rogerson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Howard W. Rogerson of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights writes Dr. King seeking his opinion and advice regarding a "technical publication for disseminating information on current activities and publications in the field of civil rights."

Correspondence to Dr. King from Chuck Wallis, 11/15/1962

Thursday, November 15, 1962
New York (NY)

Chuck Wallis, of Keuka College in New York, wrote to Dr. King at the request of Melvin Arnold an executive at Harper and Rowe Publishing Company. In the letter Wallis informs Dr. King of his editing responsibilities for a forthcoming book project highlighting Dr. King's sermons and requests a face to face meeting to discuss revisions.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter from George G. Hill to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
Hartford, CT

George Hill expresses that he will continue to support the SCLC but feels the need to make two suggestions regarding the Alabama boycott and Vietnam War. He questions the use of economic force in obtaing equal rights and suggests the need to connect with underprivileged around the world.

Man

Dr. King notes that the psalmist’s view of man in Psalms 12:1 seems to indicate that there are no longer godly men.

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."

Letter from Harper & Row to Joan Daves regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 11, 1964

Harper & Row informs Joan Daves about the receipt of the quote on Dr. King from Harry Golden, Editor of the Carolina Israelite.

Letter from a Disgruntled Author

The author expresses his grievances towards Dr. King and his leadership of the civil rights movement.

Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights

JAMAICA

Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
SWEDEN

Bolennart Andersson, President of the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden, sends a congratulatory letter and an invitation to Dr. King to speak to their student union.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

Thursday, October 27, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, JAPAN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Oslo, Norway, SWEDEN

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Jacob Javits to MLK

Wednesday, May 13, 1964
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Senator Jacob Javits expresses his gratitude for an inscribed book that Dr. King sent him.

Preliminary Outline for a Conference on Democratic Planning For America

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE

This preliminary outline features a number of keynote dignitaries and leaders who will address a number of economic, labor, and social justice issues during the three-day Conference on Democratic Planning for America.

Letter from Hans-Luder Temmen to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Atlanta, GA, GERMANY

This document contains a request for Dr. King's autograph from Mr. Temmen in Germany.

Letter from the Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

Thursday, August 1, 1963
New York (NY), CANADA

The Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund informs Dr. King that they have distributed copies of the Letter from Birmingham Jail. Those who read the letter were impressed and described it as a "masterful job." The organization contributes to the SCLC for lobbying the passage of the President's Civil Rights Bill.

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Friday, July 23, 1965
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Kenneth B. Keating, the Chairman of the Population Crisis Committee, invited Dr. King to join the committee. The organization seeks to help deal with the growing population and ever scarcer resources.

Hell (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nikolai Berdyaev on the concept of hell.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.