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Letter from Thomas Hejzlar to MLK

Friday, December 1, 1967

Student Thomas Hejzlar of Czechoslovakia writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph. He includes a postcard for Dr. King to sign and return.

Letter from MLK to Victoria Gist

Dr. King apologizes for a belated reply and says he hopes the State Youth Congress meeting was successful. King was invited to be banquet speaker.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

The Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference On Africa sent this letter to update Dr. King and other committee members about plans for the third national biennial leadership conference.

Letter from Paul Feldman to MLK About New Publications

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter Paul Feldman, the Publications Coordinator for the League for Industrial Democracy, informs Dr. King of the upcoming publication of a new work entitled, "American Power in the Twentieth Century" by Michael Harrington. Feldman also informs Dr. King of the predicted demand for the publication and urges him to place his order early.

Letter from W. L. Overholser to MLK

Saturday, August 13, 1966

W.L. Overholser of Winnimac, Indiana proposes that the SCLC change its tactics and support the Peace Welfare Party that he is forming. He maintains that, because too few people control too much of the country's wealth, a lack of jobs creates too much feuding and racial prejudice. Overholser argues that neither party can serve both the richest 10%, who control all the wealth, and the other 90% of the country, because the disparity makes most politicians two-faced. Overholser feels that whites and blacks should focus on forming a new party, and asks Dr.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Huston

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a copy of "Strength to Love" and "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" to his friend Ruth Huston of New York City. Jokingly, Dr. King characterizes what Huston's reaction might be to "Strength to Love," due to Huston's own personal beliefs about religion. He emphasized that she may be disinterested in reading the book of sermons, but "on the other hand they may give you some religion."

What Will You Be When You Grow Up

This pamphlet is one of the early equal employment opportunity publications by the US government. The President's committee on government contracts was established by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1953.

Letter from Marilyn Coulter to MLK

Saturday, October 26, 1963

Marilyn Coulter asks Dr. King to provide information for her research paper entitled "Segregation."

Letter from William Seabron to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Department of Agriculture Assistant to the Secretary, William M. Seabron writes Dr. King to enquire about fire insurance for "Negro citizens." He explains that a lack of fire insurance prevents citizens from improving existing homes or building new ones, following disaster. In addition, he requests any additional information Dr. King may find useful to the Department of Agriculture.

Letter from Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild

Monday, January 9, 1967

This letter is an invitation from Rabbi Rothschild to the Eighteenth Annual Institute for the Christian Clergy. Throughout the letter the Rabbi outlines the activities of the day and expresses his appreciation for all who will attend.

Letter from MLK to Steve Rubicz

Friday, October 5, 1962

Dr. King responds to a previous letter from Steve Rubicz to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation to speak at the University of Washington. Dr. King regretfully declines due to several speaking engagements on his schedule keeping him from accepting additional commitments.

Letter from Ms. Dora Byron of Emory University to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

In this letter, Ms. Byron of Emory University's Community Educational Service requests for Dr. King to appear on a new campus public service television program entitled "Profile."

Telegram from MLK to Albert Shanker

Dr. King expresses his full support of the United Federation of Teachers in their effort to improve their living and working conditions.

MLK Address - The Association of The Bar of the City of New York

Wednesday, April 21, 1965

Dr. King gives an address to the Association of The Bar of the City of New York at the Hilton Hotel in New York. He praises lawyers for using their knowledge to aid the Civil Rights Movement. He states that Negro lawyers bring wisdom and a determination to win to the courtroom. Dr. King also defines an unjust law as a law that is "out of harmony with moral law of the universe."

Letter from the Associated Negro Press to MLK

Saturday, November 27, 1965

Donald Kittell, an administrative assistant for the Associated Negro Press, writes to Dr. King regarding his four "My Dream" columns. Enclosed in the letter is a copy of each column. Dr. King writes on a variety of topics such as social justice, equality, nonviolence and the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

SANE Action: Citizens' Milk Strike

Friday, February 16, 1962

As an economic act against pollution and a nuclear war, the National Committee For A SANE Nuclear Policy stages a Citizens' Milk Strike.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Baruch Spinoza's "Epistle 21" to Henry Oldenburg.

MLK Notes for Speech to the Chicago Headline Club

This is a draft of a speech Dr. King delivered to the Chicago Headline Club. The speech encompasses information regarding the difficulty the media may have covering the SCLC and the Civil Rights Movement.

Appeal from the Circuit Court of Cook County

Defendant-Appelant Frank Ditto filed for an appeal against the City of Chicago after feeling he was unconstitutionally denied a trial by jury. Ditto, Dr. King, and others were on trial previously for their demonstrations in the Chicago, Illinois.

MLK's Plans for Cleveland

Dr. King outlines programs and development that he will implement in Cleveland. King frequently went to Cleveland throughout his time as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

Adverse Message from Dr. Douglas of Sarasota, FL

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

This message from Dr. Douglas was given over the telephone #525-1717 in Springfield, Illinois. Douglas discusses his beliefs on racism and communism in regards to Dr. King. He discusses how communist are the followers of Dr. King, and also how the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in order to cause a "communist world revolution." Bayard Rustin is described by Douglas as a "pervert, jail bird" close associate of Dr. King.

Ritschl

Dr. King records a quote of Albrecht Ritschl regarding Christology.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Letter from Lenore Aikens to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Lenore Aikens congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She also asks how the Christian Citizenship Committee of United Church Women can be a part of the cause.

Note to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964

In a brief note, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of an enclosed British publisher's catalogue for his review.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Public School 33 Manhattan's Student Council

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

The Student Council of Public School 33 in Manhattan, NY, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King. The council pledged to practice Dr. King's principles on nonviolence and mentioned how impressed they were to see Mrs. King on television, following Dr. King's death.

Dr. King's Involvement with the Second Emancipation Proclamation

Saturday, March 24, 1962

This article states, Dr. King recently announced President Kennedy has request he submit for his signature a second Emancipation Proclamation.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.

Letter from Merle B. Foreman to MLK

Tuesday, October 11, 1966

Merle B. Foreman is writing to Dr. King in hopes of receiving an autograph. She also encloses a self addressed stamped envelope.