Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"SWEDEN"

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

Letter from University of Saskatchewan's Student Union to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

A representative of the Student Union at the University of Saskatoon writes Dr. King inviting him to speak about the Civil Rights Movement. The representative asserts "the problems which you face are a matter for attention of the entire world."

Letter from MLK to Quentin N. Burdick

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Quentin Burdick, a United States Senator from North Dakota, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to MLK

Friday, June 14, 1963

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to Dr. King congratulatiing him on his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

SCLC Benefit Appeal

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Dr. King personally requests the support of forty organizations for SCLC's "Stars for Freedom" benefit. The appeal states that featured artists at the event include Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, and Sidney Portier, and Dr. King will also be speaking at the event.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Letter From William N. Goldsmith to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963

William N. Goldsmith informs Dr. King of funds that were collected at Brandeis University for the SCLC. Mr. Goldsmith also apologizes for Dr. King having to bear so much of the load in Birmingham.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Progress

Dr. King writes that progress has to do with value in human life.

Letter from MLK to Senator Jennings Randolph

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to the Honorable Jenning Randolph, US Senator from West Virginia, for supporting passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Project Head Start: A Pre-school Program for Children

This letter and enclosure from Project Head Start, sponsored by the OEO, is written to an anonymous recipient describing some of the features of the program.

Letter from A. Morsbach to MLK

Tuesday, October 18, 1966

A. Morsbach writes Dr. King regarding his tour to the Holy Land. Having years of experience with group travel, Morsbach informs Dr. King that he plans to check the background of Concreta Tours. He further suggests that King investigate Concreta Tours prior to concluding final travel arrangements.

Letter from Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Hector G. Trout, Assistant Secretary of the Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, expresses interest in Dr. King speaking at their teachers' convention.

How Dodd Differs From Powell/Dwellings Toured

The newspaper article entitled, "How Dodd Differs From Powell," examines how differently Senator J. Dodd and Congressman Adam C. Powell were treated after a major controversy. This controversy resulted in the removal of Congressman Powell from office.

Letter to Reverend Ralph Abernathy from Eleanore Wallace

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Mrs. Wallace writes to Rev. Abernathy in admiration of how he has carried on the work of Dr. King and wants to know how she can further contribute to the SCLC.

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.

Letter from Mrs. Carrie Fillmore to MLK

Mrs. Fillmore requests help from Dr. King as she informs him that she has six children and cannot afford to get them into schools. She also lets Dr. King know that she has gone to the NAACP without results.

Letter from Lance Redford to Mrs. King

Lance Redford, a student in New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King.

Sin

Dr. King quotes Isaiah 9:17, a passage from the Bible concerning sin.

Bayard Rustin: Goals and Strategies

Thursday, August 20, 1964

In this speech, given before Bowdoin College in 1964, Bayard Rustin outlines the basis of civil rights issues currently being fought for. He argues that man must come together as one and face the problem with our society, and that African Americans see the problems with society more than other races because they are struggling to bring civil rights and social change to all.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK about Selections from "Strength to Love"

Friday, December 30, 1966

In this letter, Campe encloses payment for the rights of an English-language textbook to reprint five selections from Dr. King's "Strength to Love".

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Saturday, March 29, 1969

Harry Daniels stresses the urgency of an American withdrawal from Asia and proposes appointing Dr. King as special ambassador to North Vietnam.

Draft of Statement "Vote No on State Question 409" by MLK

In this draft of a statement, Dr. King discusses the misnomer of 'right-to-work,' stating that the law is against Civil Rights as it is anti-union.

Philosophy

Dr. King writes about the proper function of philosophy.

The Poor People's Campaign Informational Flyer

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference circulates an informational flyer for The Poor Peoples Campaign held in Washington, D.C. This demonstration is to highlight the grave problems of the poor and is a call to the government to address the needs of the poor.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Letter from Mary Meeks to MLK

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Mrs. Meeks praises Dr. King for his nonviolent approach. She describes Dr. King as a "man of God" and believes that he is also a servant of God.