Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"SWEDEN"

Social Ethics

Dr. King records a quote from Psalms 41:1 and connects the passage to social ethics.

Letter from Catherine Enge to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Catherine Enge, on behalf of the Bergens Kristenruss, asks Dr. King to write a newspaper article that will be distributed to approximately 12,000 Norwegians.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this letter to Dr. King, Mr. Sakrikar offers a statue of Mahatma Gandhi for a children's park. He then explains the importance of this statue to the vision and practices of Dr. King as it relates to the methodology of Mahatma Gandhi.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Immortality

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Dr. Oswald Spengler regarding his ideology of immortality. According to Spengler, history holds no permanent value. King states "If such a philosophy of history is right there would be no reason to desire continued existence...immortality would have no meaning."

Sin

Dr. King cites a quote from Reinhold Niebuhr regarding sin.

Letter from SNCC's Judy Richardson to Coretta Scott King

Sunday, September 5, 1965

Judy Richardson of SNCC writes to Mrs. King to give her a copy of the new Negro history primer, "Negroes in American History." The book serves as a method of teaching children about African American history while tying in elements of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Tuesday, December 11, 1962

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Rembert Stokes to MLK

Monday, December 16, 1963

The President of Wilberforce University anticipates Dr. King's speech before a delegation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Rembert Stokes also notes that Dr. King would receive a donation following his address, to help support the civil rights movement. Stokes wishes that Dr. King's message would center around the AME church leadership's involvement in the freedom struggle.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 8, 1967

In this letter, Gitta Badeker, from the office of Joan Daves, informs Dr. King that enclosed are copies of the contract for a Norwegian-language edition of "Where Do We Go from Here. The contract requested for Dr. King to sign and initial.

Women Are For Peace/Jeanette Rankin Rank and File Poster

Flyer announcing "Women are for Peace" sponsored by Former Congresswoman Jeannette Rankin. Representative Rankin led thousands of women to Washington, DC to petition former colleagues in Congress to end the war.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Mapp and Welch Families

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. Coretta Scott King express their condolences to the Mapp and Welch Families, and the West Hunter Street Baptist Church.

Telegram from MLK to Derhanov Dinke

Dr. King informs Ambassador Derhanov Dinke that it is his pleasure to serve as Honorary President for the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He invites Ambassador Dinke to attend a luncheon at the Sheraton Carlton Hotel in Washington, D. C.

Letter from Fred Sondermann to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Mr. Sondermann invites Dr. King on behalf of Colorado College to speak at their annual symposium. Mr. Sondermann discusses this important tradition and explains the upcoming topic.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Thursday, February 13, 1964

Helga Gulbrandsen invites Dr. King to speak for the Norwegian Fellowship in Oslo, Norway.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Rev. George W. Gunn

Friday, August 6, 1965

Reverend Andrew Young informs Reverend George Gunn of the Presbyterian University Center that he will not be in attendance at the Campus Ministry Association meeting due to an emergency situation in Americus, Georgia that requires his special attention.

Letter from Phyllis Kaplan to Readers

Academic Media sends out a questionnaire to gather important data regarding financial aid programs.

Letter from Representative Ken W. Dyal to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to inform him that he has signed the discharge petition for the Home Rule Bill.

Religious Witness For Human Dignity Booklet

Sunday, May 31, 1964

Religious Witness for Human Dignity seeks the support of members of the Protestant, Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Jewish Communities in the struggle for civil rights.

Letter from Bill Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, January 5, 1966

William Bennett offers the suggestion that the phrase "dark skinned" be used to describe people of color. Bennett encountered the phrase while on a trip in Bermuda, and realized he should enforce the idea that skin color does not determine American citizenship.

The Shaking Off of Burdens

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Professor Robert Birley delivers an annual memorial lecture on T.B. Davie at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He notes that Mr. Davie served as vice-chancellor for the college and is most noted for his adherence to the principles of academic freedom and his stand against apartheid. Birley believes that this annual memorial is absolutely necessary to maintain Davie's inspirational legacy and continue the fight for academic freedom . He brings up the politics of slaves versus the free, drawing on the philosophies of Aristotle, Plato, and others to describe examples.

I Have A Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

Location & Situation

Dr. King compares the meanings of "location" and "situation."

Letter from Bob Strain to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1961

Bob Strain writes Dr. King after reading an article in Newsweek entitled "Albany Movement." He apologizes for the ignorant behavior of fellow whites and expresses his desire to be a part of the movement. He also conveys his admiration for Dr. King and his work.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee Democratic National Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a plea to the Democratic National Committee to provide a delegate from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party so that there may be equal representation within the state. Dr. King's feels that by providing a delegate it may discontinue the prevention of political participation of African Americans in Mississippi.

Weatherhead on Love

Dr. King records a quote from Leslie Dixon Weatherhead's "Why Men Suffer."

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Coretta Scott King

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

In this letter, Harry G. Boyte offers his personal admiration to Mrs. King for the "strength [she has] provided Dr. King."

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

Friday, December 23, 1966

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Benjamin E. Mays

Monday, May 4, 1964

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Benjamin E. Mays that an advance copy of Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," is being sent in appreciation of Dr. Mays' support.