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"SWEDEN"

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett, Dorothy M. Steere, and George C. Hardin

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Montgomery, AL

The Religious Society of Friends, which consists of 17,000 Quakers, decides to send its members to spread a message of "love and goodwill" to both whites and Negroes of Philadelphia.

Letter from James H. Duckrey to MLK

Wednesday, March 11, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

James H. Duckrey, President of Cheyney State College, writes Dr. King asking him to serve as the Commencement Speaker. He briefly discusses the history of the college and informs Dr. King of the Honorarium.

Telegram from Harold Willens to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 10, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA

Mr. Willens forwards a telegram to Dora McDonald that he had previously sent to Andrew Young. Willens invited Ralph D. Abernathy to be a guest on "Issues and Answers." Abernathy initially declined the invitation only later to accept, which lead Willens to inform him of the potential "impact and consequences."

Letter from Ronald H. Lind to MLK

Thursday, March 9, 1967
Missouri (MO)

Reverend Ronald Lind writes to Dr. King, urging him to take a positive stand on the integrity of Representative Adam Clayton Powell.

Trinitarianism

Dr. King discusses the doctrine trinitarianism, the belief that God is one being, existing in three equal persons.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962
California (CA)

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Statement Issued from Harlem Hospital by MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the staff at Harlem Hospital and those who supported him during his stay at this location. He asserts that the telegrams, letters, calls and other means of contact have been accepted as a token of respect.

The Massachusetts Review: A Legacy of Creative Protest

Friday, September 7, 1962
Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes of the influence of Henry David Thoreau's essay on the duty of civil disobedience in forming his belief that non-cooperation with evil is a moral obligation. He cites lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, and the bus boycott as evidence that Thoreau’s thinking is still alive. This article appeared in a special 1962 issue of The Massachusetts Review commemorating the centennial of Thoreau’s death.

Letter from Stan Brooks to MLK

Monday, June 1, 1964
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Stan Brooks, of Wins Radio 1010, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude and enjoyment concerning Dr. King's appearance on a recent broadcast.

Letter from Miss Shirley Wright to Mrs. King

Thursday, February 3, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King writes Shirley Wright of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, thanking her for the copy of the "We Shall Overcome" record.

Letter from Stephen Goodyear to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
New York, Connecticut (CT), Chicago, IL

Stephen Goodyear expresses appreciation for an inscribed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?", as well as his enthusiasm regarding Dr. King's attendance at the National Conference for New Politics.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA)

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."

Berdyaev

Dr. King quotes a passage from Nikolai Berdyaev's "Slavery and Freedom" about religious, technological and spiritual revolutions.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Indiana (IN)

Dr. Kings thanks Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton for her and Mr. James Peterson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
Boston, MA, St. Augustine, FL, New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Florida (FL)

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Letter from O. O. Rabb to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967
Atlanta, GA

This note and newspaper clipping from O.O. Robb was addressed to "The Right Reverend Martin Luther King, Pastor & Civil Rights Agitator." Robb assures Dr. King that he would, in fact, find supporters, "for there are many soft-headed wild-eyed people who have a soft heart and no brains who will follow." Robb contines that President Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty must go on and ends that Dr. King and his supporters will get their reward - a prison cell.

Letter from The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

A member of The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge in Milwaukee informs Dr. King of his study on the Negro voter. The study determined that Mississippi has the most non-registered Negro voters.

Letter from Senator Charles H. Percy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

United States Senator, Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that he would like him to read the enclosed speech, "Toward Responsible Freedom", given before the Community Renewal Society of Chicago. The senator also provides an update on the housing proposal and gives Dr.King a copy of the committee report.

Letter from Robert Way to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Robert Way, Chairman of the Hadley Executive Committee, writes to correct a misunderstanding regarding restrictions on the contents of a lecture Dr. King is scheduled to deliver. Mr. Way assures Dr. King he has the freedom to express what he feels is important.

Evil (Natural)

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson on the topic of evil.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Monday, June 17, 1963

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK

Tuesday, October 23, 1962
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Dow Kirkpatrick, Pastor of First Methodist Church in Evanston, Illinois, invites Dr. King to dinner during his visit to Evanston.

Post Card to MLK from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College

Monday, September 12, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This 1966 post card from Benjamin Mays, Morehouse College, is a thank-you note to Dr. King and "the Morehouse men" who made alumni contributions.

Peter Denied His Lord, And Cryed

Sam Bradley, from Friends Journal, composes a poem illustrating Saint Peter's denial of Jesus.

Letter from MLK to Miss Read

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Miss Read's "interest in and support of our work and the American Negroes [sic] struggle for freedom and dignity."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Albert Weiss to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
Wisconsin (WI)

A Wisconsin couple criticizes Dr. King for "outcries" against policy in Vietnam and the "so called peace movement."

Telegram from MLK to Chris Folker

SWEDEN

Dr. King expresses enthusiasm regarding his upcoming trip to Sweden.

Letter from Katherine Camp to Dora McDonald

Friday, September 10, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Katherine L. Camp, Chairman for the Fiftieth Anniverdary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dora McDonald regarding plans for Dr. King's address at the banquet. Mrs. Coretta Scott King is listed as one of the sponsors for the event.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963
California (CA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962
Albany, GA

This paper states that segregation is both unconstitutional and immoral. It calls for a face-to-face meeting with the Albany, Georgia City Commission to discuss disposition of cases against the Albany Movement and a commitment to the First Amendment right of peaceful protest; clarification of the city’s position on the recent Interstate Commerce Commission ruling and desegregation of the city’s buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to recommend a timetable for desegregating lunch counters, the library, schools, and parks.