Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"SWITZERLAND"

Letter from William H. Chester to MLK

Friday, September 6, 1963

William H. Chester writes Dr. King enclosing a donation to the SCLC from Mary Louise Hooper, chairman of the Northern California Committee on African Affairs, on behalf of the San Francisco Church-Labor Conference. The organization conducted a Human Rights Day parade that was broadcast in Africa. Mr. Chester further informs Dr. King that Mrs. Hooper encourages the SCLC to "keep moving forward until victory is achieved."

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

Tuesday, October 1, 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from "A Red Blooded American Who Is Opposed to Your Tactics of Un-Americanism"

Thursday, April 27, 1967

This letter to Dr. King criticizes his presumed anti-American activities. The author, who signs as "A Red Blooded American who is opposed to your tactics of un-Americanism," describes herself as the mother and grandmother of men who have served in the armed forces.

Letter from Beryl Arensberg to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Beryl Arensberg writes Dr. King asking him to consider a strategy that emphasizes a collective mourning for all those impacted by the Vietnam War. He believes such a course of action will inspire direct impact in several admirable ways.

Letter from A. Dolezalek to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

A. Dolezaler, director of a German library, requests a copy of a poster published by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He would like to add the poster to a collection about social, political movements.

Congratulatory Letter from YWCA to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

The YWCA congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Francis Drake to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Francis Drake sends Dr. King a donation to the SCLC collected on behalf of the Drake Family as a Thanksgiving gift. Drake and his wife are ministers with the United Church of Christ in Massachusetts and support Dr. King's fight for freedom and justice.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King cross-references fundamentalism with authoritarianism.

Evil

Dr. King outlines his views on evil and categorizes it into three types.

Letter from Gwendolyn E. Coleman to MLK

Thursday, March 4, 1965

Mrs. Gwendolyn Coleman, Secretary of the Raleigh County Branch of the NAACP, invites Dr. King to speak during a Freedom Rally in an effort to unite the community for employment.

Letter from Margery Bray to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Margery Bray writes Dr. King discussing how the women in America were engaged in similar demonstrations to secure their right to vote. Bray states that legislation is the only way to efficiently change things, and admits that she has recently become an active voter.

Letter from Ozro T. Jones to the SCLC's C. T. Vivian

Friday, May 28, 1965

Ozro Jones, President of the International Youth Congress, writes C. T. Vivian stating that he sincerely appreciates Dr. King for accepting the invitation to speak at the International Youth Congress in Chicago.

Letter from John. O Behrens to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Mr. Behrens welcomes Dr. King to the city of Chicago. In an effort to show his gratitude, Behrens offers Dr. King a subcription to "Community", a magazine published by Friendship House. He also requests an opportunity to interview with Dr. King.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Abram Eisenman, a 1968 candidate for President of the United States, requested Dr. King's assistance in his campaign for the New Hampshire ballot.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Letter from MLK to Rev. M. L. Shepard, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. M. L. Shepard for his "generous gift." Dr. King stresses the importance of support from friends like Rev. Shepard for the survival of SCLC. He also informs Rev. Shepard that he will receive material from the SCLC to update his congregation on the progress of work in the South.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Letter from Clair M. Cook to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Mr. Cook, legislative assisant to Senator Hartke of Indiana, thanks Dr. King for his recent letter lauding Senator Hartke for supporting the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Cook also recalls his and Dr. King's experience at Boston University.

Integrating Classes

Friday, August 12, 1966

This article discusses Harold Howe II's opinion regarding segregated schools and his work towards integration. Howe asserts that segregation is bad for anyone concerned, such as minorities, poor kids, whites, or blacks.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Monday, January 23, 1967

R. W. Boone sends this Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Routing Slip to Dr. King. The slip lists the name "Andy," which could be in reference to King's associate Andrew Young.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, August 3, 1964

Ms. Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her conversation with Harper & Row concerning the advertisements for the book "Why We Can't Wait." She describes their negotiations and asks for further guidance.

God

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosophy, God, and the world. King quotes Dr. Shirley Guthrie, "It is the Lord; let him do what seemeth Him good."

Letter from Jane Dahlberg to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

New York University Dean Jane Dahlberg congratulates Dr. King for taking a noble position against the Vietnam War. As a result of his participation in the New York anti-war demonstration, Dahlberg believes that his example of nonviolence was highly emphasized during the march.

Initiative for Peace In Vietnam

Friday, March 10, 1967

Philip Noel-Baker and Father George Dominique Pire detail the origins of the Initiative for Peace in Vietnam and its action plan. As they explain, a group of Norwegian citizens approached living Nobel Peace Prize winners to develop a project focusing on achieving peace in Vietnam. To reach that goal, the initiative plans to send representatives to each group involved with the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from Jacob H. Gilbert to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Gilbert writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter and copy of his book "Why We Can't Wait." Prior to the vote to seat the Mississippi delegation, Dr. King contacted several government officials urging them to vote against the seating. Congressman Gilbert states that he objected to the seating albeit unsuccessfully.

Notes on Generational Questions

The document, shown here, was briefly handwritten by Dr. King. Some of the writing in the document says, "One of the most important questions raised in any generation is the question.........." The remaining content of the document is unwritten.

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ernest J. Chave's "A Functional Approach to Religious Education."