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Letter from V. W. Shepard to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

V. W. Shepard admonishes Dr. King for joining the anti-Vietnam War Movement. He explains that prior to Dr. King's joining the movement he considered the Reverend to be "one of the greatest living Americans."

Testament by Martin A. Watkins

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Martin Watkins covers an array of topics in his expression of poems entitled "Testament." With great admiration, Watkins presents this book of poetry to Dr. King. In the preface, Watkins explains his purpose of publishing these poems during the Korean War. He further elaborates on his admiration of the Negro, his preoccupation with death, and the identification with Christ.

Letter from EEOC Commissioner Samuel C. Jackson to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Commissioner Samuel Jackson sends Dr. King a copy of the First Annual Report of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Schleiermacher (Attributes of God)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

People to People: Going To Chicago

Saturday, January 15, 1966

This article appeared in Dr. King's weekly People to People column in the New York Amsterdam News. In it, he discusses the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations in the Chicago Movement.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

An individual finds it insulting that Dr. King is compared to Abraham Lincoln and would like Dr. King to be remembered as a traitor.

Letter from Kenneth Ives to MLK

Monday, August 28, 1967

Kenneth Ives writes a letter and encloses his research that could be beneficial to Dr. King. Ives studied the effects of various social policy efforts on individuals and on society in general.

Letter from MLK to Crawford Johnson

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Dr. King visited the city of Paris and was tremendously impressed with the people's interest or racial justice in the United States. Dr. King hopes that a meeting can take place to engage the people of Paris to further support the civil rights movement by providing financial aid to the SCLC.

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Monday, March 11, 1968

Dr. King writes to members of the Action Committee informing them of the date, time, and duties required for the meeting.

Letter from Jay Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964

Jay Richard Kennedy congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also comments on the importance of international recognition for the current struggle for equality.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Fixler

Friday, December 8, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Bernard Fixler, from Dr. King, he thanks Mr. Fixler for the contribution made to the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harold E. Fey

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Dora McDonald is requesting that Harold Fey re-new Dr. King's subscription to "The Christian Century" for one year.

Invitation from President Kennedy to MLK

The President of the United States invites Dr. King to attend a luncheon at the White House.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Szolyvai

Sunday, July 26, 1964

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Szolyvai's request for a meeting with Dr. King. She informs him that Dr. King is unsure of the next time he will be in New York, however she says they will keep his letter in mind.

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

Letter from MLK to May Edward Chinn

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King responds to Dr. May Chinn's letter of support and encouragement. King states, "Our struggle for freedom is often difficult and the moments are often frustrating, but we gain new courage to carry on..."

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1964

Robert Kennedy writes Dr. King requesting to interview him for an oral history program on the Kennedy Administration. Kennedy asserts, "You are obviously one of the persons who ought to be interviewed in order to get a full record of the Administration."

Reason (Its Value in Revelation)

Dr. King quotes John Locke’s “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Book IV.”

Religion and Peace of Soul

Dr. King cites a quotation from Jesus Christ that discusses peace, the "chief legacy" of religion. Dr. King explains that inner peace is maintained regardless of the external adversity one endures in life. Dr. King continues to elaborate on the necessary functional relationship one must have with God. He further describes the association between good, evil, innocence and more.

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Letter from Earl W. Hall to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

The National Observer publishes an article entitled "Prophet or Propagandist" to critique Dr. King's political stance on the Vietnam War. Earl Hall objects to these perceptions deliberated in this article and contacts the National Observer to express his concerns. To support his argument, Mr. Hall references biblical prophets from the Old Testament. Mr. Hall communicates this information with Dr. King and informs him of their correlating views on the Vietnam War.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Injunction from the City of Birmingham

Several members of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, including Dr. King, receive a temporary injunction from the City of Birmingham.

SCLC Duties

This document outlines general responsibilities and specific duties of SCLC officers. Top level members listed include Dr. King, President, Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to President, Andrew Young, Program Director, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, Office Manager and Educational Consultant, and Ralph Abernathy, Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The document states that Dr. King's general responsibility as President is to "coordinate and interpret the total program of SCLC."

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, February 19, 1962

Dr. King and Wyatt Walker send an urgent request for Burke Marshall to investigate the bombing of SCLC Board Member C. O. Simpkins' home in Shreveport, Louisiana. The two SCLC officials inform Mr. Marshall that the suspects were released for lack of evidence despite other information to the contrary.

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

Friday, July 10, 1959

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

MLK Draft on Jackie Robinson and Hall of Fame

Wednesday, July 25, 1962

Dr. King highlights the achievements of Jackie Robinson in this article about Robinson's induction into baseball's Hall of Fame. Dr. King applauds Robinson for using his celebrity status for the Civil Rights Movement.