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Reservation Request Letter from Morehouse

Monday, February 13, 1967

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, writes Dr. King to inform him of the school's upcoming "Centennial activities." Hoping both he and Mrs. King will attend, he kindly urges Dr. King to RSVP immediately for the event on Friday evening. The writing on the letter indicates that Dr. Mays' request was answered via telephone.

Letter from Ned and Augusta Thomas to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Ned and Augusta Thomas write Dr. King asking if SCLC is truly a "nonsectarian agency," then why is the word "Christian" a part of the name? They also state that they "strongly back" Dr. King's stand on Vietnam.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Hugh Morrow

Monday, June 25, 1962

Wyatt Tee Walker writes to Hugh Morrow expressing his grievance for the attack of Governor Rockefeller.

Test of Address by Vice President Richard M. Nixon

Friday, October 19, 1956

Vice President Nixon discusses the legacy of Alfred E. Smith and how it correlates with the American dream.

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

Letter from MLK to Helen Anderson

Friday, February 9, 1968

This letter is in acknowledgement and appreciation of contributions to the SCLC from Mrs. Helen Anderson to Dr. King which was overlooked in the mail.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Wachtel

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Ms. McDonald sends Mr. Wachtel Dr. King's schedules for visiting Oslo, Norway. Dr. King is traveling to Norway to receive his Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Thelton Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

Mr. Henderson, of the University of California-Berkeley, invites Dr. King to participate in a Civil Rights Symposium. Notable persons such as Robert Kennedy and Stokley Carmichael previously appeared at the symposium.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Langone

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Langone due to other writing commitments for the next several months, Dr. King is unable to accept his invitation to write an article for his journal, Psychiatric Opinion.

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

Letter from MLK to Linda Cann

Tuesday, November 30, 1965

Dr. King writes Linda Cann, a member of the Canadian Women's Press Club in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He informs Mrs. Cann that he cannot accept her invitation to speak in Nova Scotia because he is trying to "grapple with the problems of discrimination that Negroes still face."

The New Frontiersmen

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

MLK on Danville and the Problem of Violence

Friday, July 12, 1963

Dr. King discusses his perception of the nonviolent movement, and how the leadership maintains control even though minimal violent outbreaks may occur.

African American Unity in Atlanta, Georgia

The author of this document discusses why it is imperative for African Americans to not only stand in unity against the injustices of society, but to also be informed about the issues in which they strive to prevail against. Information about school integration, housing discrimination, and taxation is offered in the conclusion of the document.

Letter from Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Ms. Tourian commends Dr. King for his efforts against violence and describes the antagonism and discrimination against immigrants when she came as an Armenian to the U.S. in 1903.

Letter from Eileen Coyne to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Second grader Eileen Coyne sends condolences to the King family. She and her classmates were instructed to write letters to Mrs. King to express their feelings following Dr. King's assassination. This document is a part of a collection of sixteen letters from this Bronx, New York classroom.

You and the Poor People's Campaign

This document contains detailed information regarding the Poor People's Campaign. This document also discusses the Satyagraha movement, a nonviolent movement that means "truth force."

Agenda for the SCLC State and Local Leaders

Friday, February 2, 1962

This agenda outlines several topics discussed for the Southwide Meeting of State and Local Leaders. Dr. King, the President of the SCLC, spoke on SCLC's 'People to People' Program.

Interruptions: Man from Porlock

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Dr. King delivered this sermon, "Interruptions," on January 21, 1968 at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He describes how no one lives a life free of interruptions, and that the major problem of life is learning how to handle them.

David T. Doherty Letter of Request to Dr. King

Friday, February 10, 1967

Mr. Deherty, a PH.D candidate at Stanford University, asks Dr. King if he will answer a few questions regarding the influence of Henry David Thoreau on his philosophy of non-violence.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

Letter from MLK to the Nobel Institute

Wednesday, January 25, 1967

Dr. King nominates Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk from Vietnam, for the Nobel Peace Prize. He describes Hanh's accomplishments and assures that he is "an apostle of peace and non-violence.

Letter of Recommendation for Sally Cantor

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Mrs. W. M. Taylor, an English teacher at Grady High School, writes a letter of recommendation on behalf of Sally Cantor, a Russell H. Bull Scholarship applicant.

Invitation from President Kennedy to MLK

The President of the United States invites Dr. King to attend a luncheon at the White House.

Letter from Virginia Madden to Mrs. King

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Virginia Madden, a 91-year-old white woman from Philadelphia, writes to congratulate Mrs. King on Dr. King's winning the Nobel Peace Prize. She says she has deplored racism and welcomes the new Civil Rights Law.

Letter from Claudia Harris to MLK

Claudia Harris informs Dr. King that Dana College is participating in "Choice 68." She also requests material on Dr. King's position regarding the Vietnam War, civil rights, the urban crisis and the federal budget.

Letter from MLK to Ernest McCullough

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the University of Toronto Progressive Conservative Association.

Letter from Constance A. Price to David J. Hahn

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Constance Price informs David Hahn, Colorado State Senator, of how she has suffered for the past twelve years due to the violation of her constitutional rights as guaranteed by the Workman's Compensation Act of Colorado.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

The Conditions for Progress in Africa

Thursday, September 6, 1962

In a speech at the University of Cape Town, H.F. Oppenheimer argues that Africa was a backwards content with few achievements prior to European colonization. He also says that the struggle against colonialism is thought of exclusively in political terms, but that it should also be considered in social and economic terms. He provides possible solutions for future progress in Africa, and he charges the African nationalist to complete the work that the colonialist began.