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The Second Annual Bishop Lichtenberger Human Rights Award Dinner

The Chicago Chapter of The Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity invites Dr. King to the Second Annual Bishop Lichtenberger Human Rights Award Dinner. This award is being accepted by Mrs. Philip B. Daniels on behalf of her late son, Jonathan Myrick Daniels.

Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

SCLC Audit Notice

Tuesday, December 19, 1967

Mr. Rutherford writes to inform Citizens Trust Company that there will be an audit of the SCLC. Rutherford requests that the bank send a list of any and all accounts associated with SCLC.

Statement on Nobel and Catholic Interracial Council Awards

Saturday, October 17, 1964

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, lauds Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and announces that the Council is awarding King its John F. Kennedy Award.

Letter from E.E.H. to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

The author of this letter speaks out against the efforts of Reverend Abernathy, calling the March on Washington a cheap show and calling for an end to civil rights demonstrations in general.

SCLC Board Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This document is a proposed agenda for an SCLC board meeting, which includes Dr. King's notes of additional agenda items.

Letter from Hermine I. Popper to MLK

Wednesday, January 25, 1967

Hermine Popper writes Dr. King regarding his manuscript on "Black Power" for his upcoming book.

Letter from MLK to Clifford Joesph

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mr. Joseph for donating Christmas cards to the SCLC.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

The True Nature of Religion

Dr. King discusses the true nature of religion as both an inward and outward experience. The subject "He" is unidentified.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Thursday, December 19, 1963

In this letter to Dr. Mays, Dr. King mentions a letter of recommendation written on the behalf of William Herbert Gray Jr.

Invitation to Dr. King from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Dr. King is invited to take part in the 1967 13th Annual World Conference of the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Sunday, June 18, 1967

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.


Dr. King writes that the belief in immortality by scholars in different disciplines suggests that while immortality cannot be proved nor has it been disproved.

Letter from Lyman Farrar to Ralph David Abernathy regarding Advice and Counsel

Monday, April 29, 1968

Mr. Farrar writes to Dr. Abernathy for advice and cousel in an effort to contact Negro colleges in the United States. Mr. Farrar would like to make a personal contribution for a cause in which he explains in an enclosure.

Letter from Samuel Bucholtz to MLK and Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

The Temple Israel of Hollywood sends a contribution to the SCLC and praises Wyatt Tee Walker for his appearance.

Southern Rural Action Project

Saturday, April 1, 1967

The Southern Rural Action Project, an initiative of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, seeks to finance and support community development in low-income areas. This progress report highlights current field projects and objectives.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Request for Help

Monday, November 6, 1967

Marcellus M. Harper requests assistance from Dr. King in relation to economic improvement. In his letter of appeal, Mr. Harper requests that Dr. King speaks on gossip, unity, improving conditions and ways of living, and economic improvement.

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.


Dr. King writes about the proper function of philosophy.

Letter from Charles Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Charles S. Crawford expresses his dissent with Dr. King on a variety of subjects, one specifically his stance towards President Johnson and the concept of civil disobedience.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Monday, February 24, 1964

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Dora McDonald sends H. L. Wynter, Registrar for the University of the West Indies, an estimate on travel expenses Dr. King and Reverend Lee will require for their trip to Jamaica.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Thursday, August 22, 1963

This letter announces that the Gandhi Society for Human Rights, Incorporated is sponsoring a benefit concert, for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, at Carnegie Hal,l in New York City. Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra and Lena Horne are listed as some of the spotlight performers for this concert.

Telegram from John P. O'Rourke to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

John P. O'Rourke writes Dr. King to express his support of the Southern Baptist Convention.

MLK Supports New York City Teachers

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Dr. King sends telegram of support to the United Federation of Teachers backing them in their efforts to create better conditions to work and educate students.

Points for Progress, Birmingham, Alabama

This is a list or outline of points for progress in the Birmingham Campaign. They may have been used in a face-to-face presentation with local community leaders or with media officials. These words carefully enumerate the demands or wishes of the civil rights leaders and the Negro community.

The Shaking Off of Burdens

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Professor Robert Birley delivers an annual memorial lecture on T.B. Davie at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He notes that Mr. Davie served as vice-chancellor for the college and is most noted for his adherence to the principles of academic freedom and his stand against apartheid. Birley believes that this annual memorial is absolutely necessary to maintain Davie's inspirational legacy and continue the fight for academic freedom . He brings up the politics of slaves versus the free, drawing on the philosophies of Aristotle, Plato, and others to describe examples.