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Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Letter from William J. Connor to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Dr. King was the recipient of the correspondence from Mr. William J. Connor of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Connor was honored to extend a contribution to the civil rights movement. He went on to extend courtesies to Dr. King's family and Rev. Abernathy.

Letter of Gratitude to Dr. King from Willa Clark, Prince Hall Grand Chapter

Thursday, October 20, 1966

Willa Clark, Grand Worthy Matron of the Prince Hall Grand Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, wrote to Dr. King expressing a debt of appreciation for his high civic service rendered to mankind. Putting action to sentiment, the Order of the Eastern Star encloses a $500.00 donation to aid in continuing the work toward dignity and freedom.

God

Dr. King references a quote from Proverbs regarding creation and God's wisdom.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Dr. King Sermon Rough Draft - "Man Incurably Religious"

The document, shown here, is a rough draft of sermon notes, prepared by Dr. King, under the title "Man Incurably Religious." The exact timeframe, of this sermon draft, is unknown. Dr. King, in this draft, puts the spotlight on examples such as a baby's attachment to a mother, a flower's direction toward the sun and the flight pattern of a pigeon. He used a quotation of St. Augustine that said, "We come forth from God and we shall be homesick until we return to him."

Anonymous Adverse Letter

Thursday, April 6, 1967

An anonymous writer sends Dr. King this adverse letter equating Dr. King to a gorilla he saw at the zoo.

Letter from MLK to Jessie Treichler

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King writes Jessie Tresichler to inform her that he and his wife will be unable to accept her invitation to Antioch College. He explains that his calendar will not allow him to accept any more speaking engagements and that Coretta is an expecting mother.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

Letter from Theresa Sutherland to Coretta S. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Theresa Sutherland sends her condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

Wednesday, July 6, 1960

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to Dr. King

This royalty statement for the period of January 1, 1964 to December 31, 1964 is for the Dutch-language edition of "Strength to Love," published by Van Loghum Slaterus.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

Rodney Clurman requests that Dr. King attend a ten-day trip supporting various people and organizations.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Dr. King writes Mrs. Dilday of Riverside Baptist Church to express his appreciation for her two contributions to the SCLC. He explains the current works of the SCLC in Chicago and Alabama and stresses the importance of supporters like her.

Letter from Dora to Joan

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this letter, Dora McDonald sends a photograph to Joan Daves.

The Future of Integration

Friday, August 21, 1959

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

Ordained by God

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King for his proposed hypocrisy. The author contends that violence and law breaking are ungodly behaviors and therefore should not be associated with the peace movement that Dr. King endorses.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Friday, November 4, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe encloses British royalties for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Thomas Gilliam to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967

Thomas Gilliam writes this letter with hope that Dr. King will grant him an interview about the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Response letter from Dr. King regarding Mr. Altomerianos and Charles Evans Hughes High School

Thursday, October 23, 1958

Dr. King took the time to write to the faculty and students of Charles Evans Hughes High School, following his release from Harlem Hospital. In this thank you, he expressed sincere gratitude for the well wishes from the young students relayed to him during his illness. Furthermore, Dr. King acknowledged that the future would be in good hands with their involvement in the struggle for Brotherhood and Human Dignity.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

This telegram was sent from Benjamin Elijah Mays and his wife to Dr. King at the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia.

Letter from Joseph F. McCrindle to SCLC

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Joseph F. McCrindle, President of the Henfield Foundation, encloses a check of $250.00 to SCLC on behalf of the Henfield Foundation.

Some Information About Black Africa Culture

This document discusses various discoveries that have been made about African civilizations and their cultures.

Telegram from Walter Friedrich to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Walter Friedrich, on behalf of the Peace Council of the German Democratic Republic, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Washington D. C. Star: Negro Lawyer Pushing Town Incorporation Plan

Thursday, October 5, 1967

Congressman John Conyers shares an article with civil rights attorney, Orzell Billingsley. The article highlights Attorney Billingsley's efforts to join 20 predominately black municipalities, so that more African Americans can have a voice within politics and economic development.

5th Company Gives in to Breadbasket Demands for Jobs

The author writes about how operation breadbasket completed successful negotiations for new jobs for Negroes within the Chicago dairy industry.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 6, 1967

Joan Daves sends Dora McDonald a letter of thanks concerning a photostat of a letter sent to Dr. King. She also informs her that although the title of Dr. King's book has been used, one cannot copyright titles.

SCLC Press Release About a Mississippi Political Rally

Thursday, February 8, 1962

This press release describes a political rally of Negro voters in Clarksdale, Mississippi at which Dr. King spoke. It declares the need for voter registration and the possibility for Mississippi to have as many as five African-American congressmen in Washington.

Letter from Paul Eshelman to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Mr. Eshelman writes to Dr. King in support of his efforts toward helping African Americans become "first class citizens."