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"Selma, AL"

Challenge to New Age - Importance of Voting

In this challenge to the public, the author lists a number of reasons supporting the importance of voting in the black community, then concludes with a call to join the ranks of the SCLC.

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.

Letter from Gloria Caruthers to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Miss Caruthers congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She states that no other individual is more deserving of the award.

Theology and Science

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as a source on theology and science.

Immortality

Dr. King finds the best description of the unknowable nature of immortality in the New Testament of the Bible. It is a fragment of 1 Corinthians 2:9 regarding heaven.

Contribution Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

A Department of State Agency for International Development summer intern expresses his support for SCLC. He offers a small contribution to the Atlanta-based foundation.

Telegram from Roland Wolf

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

In this Western Union telegram, Roland Wolf requests Dr. King's appearance on a "conversation show" with one or two writers, allowing an opportunity to learn his views on existing issues.

Statement by MLK Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

After being notified of receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King released this statement to the public.He refers to the award not as an honor but as a "tribute to the discipline."

Letter to Rev. MLK, Sr. from Arlen Fuhlendorf

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mrs. Arlen Fuhlendorkr writes to Rev. King Sr., expressing deep sympathy for the death of Dr. King. She also wanted to convey to Rev. King that he should be proud of the great work his son did for humanity.

Letter from Wallace Best to MLK

Sunday, April 25, 1965

Wallace Best encloses a donation to the SCLC but advises against purusing economic boycotts. According to Best, an economic boycott will "greatly demean the conduct of your noble cause....."

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Wednesday, February 15, 1967

In this letter Joan Daves requests Dr. King's input on his chapter, "Black Power." Daves also inquires as to which magazine to send the manuscript first and suggests first sending it to "Life" magazine.

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Friday, August 23, 1963

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Financial Statement for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Friday, April 8, 1955

The Financial Committee at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church details the budget and contributions for October 1955 through March 1956.

Royalty Statement for Casterman Published Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement references royalties earned for a French-language edition of "Strength to Love".

Telegram from Bill Barrett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Bill Barrett sends this telegram to Dr. King notifying him of his support of the Committee Bill.

Letter from Brown University Charles A. Baldwin to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

Charles Baldwin of Brown University asks Dr. King about his travel plans and materials needed for Dr. King's upcoming sermon at the university. He also invites Dr. King to a dinner and luncheon during his visit.

Letter from Kent Bach to MLK

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

In this letter Kent Bach requests Dr. King's endorsement of "Lights On For Peace." Kent Bach plans to run a full-page ad in the New York Times expressing his objection to America's military involvement in Vietnam.

Chicago Freedom Movement Tent-In

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This flyer outlines the platform for the Chicago Freedom Movement's Tent-In. This organization, based out of Warrenville, Illinois, sought for equality in housing and was an initiative of the SCLC and Al Raby's Council of Federated Organizations.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

Dexter Echo: March 2, 1960

Wednesday, March 2, 1960

This edition of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church newsletter, The Dexter Echo, reports information about upcoming events and the latest news, including a recent gift made to Dr. King and his family. A key article speaks to the power and necessity of worship.

Letter from A. T. Walden to MLK

Thursday, June 7, 1962

A . T. Walden writes to Dr. King congratulating him on the performance of the SCLC lead program featuring the singing and acting of Harry Belafonte. Walden continues to express his belief by stating that the Reverend fills a unique role in the American dream of brotherhood and equality.

Letter from O. L. Sherrill to Ralph David Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968

The Executive Secretary of the General Baptist State Convention of North Carolina requests multiple copies of the program from Dr. King's funeral service.

Dr. Spock Joins King in March

Pediatrician and anti-war activist Dr. Benjamin Spock and Dr. King lead thousands of individuals throughout the streets of Chicago in objection to the Vietnam War. Both Dr. King and Dr. Spock express their dissatisfaction with President Johnson's focus on Vietnam rather than the war on poverty.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter from Rev. O. Tregelles Williams to MLK

Friday, February 10, 1967

Rev. Williams invites Dr. King to appear on a weekly BBC religious television program entitled "Meeting Point" during his visit to Wales in Great Britain.

Terminated Employee Asks for a Meeting with the SCLC Board

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Meredith Gilbert writes to William Rutherford regarding her termination in January 1968 from employment with SCLC.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.