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"Selma, AL"

Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

Saturday, February 11, 1967

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Winfred P. Buckwalter III to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Buckwater enclose a check for $500.00 that is intended to assist Dr. King in his efforts to stop the Vietnam conflict and help establish world peace.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

The Blame in Birmingham

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

Letter from Marshall C. Dandy to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Marshall C. Dendy, the Executive Secretary of the Board of Christian Education, invites Dr. King to be a speaker for the organization's conference in Montreat. Dendy also suggests that Dr. King reconsider his stance on America's involvement in Vietnam, even though he also detests war.

Letter from the United Nations to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Robin Skuce, Education Secretary of the United Nations Association in Canada, writes Dr. King inquiring of his availability to lecture at a seminar for high school students at their New York headquarters.

Letter From Walter J. Benedict to MLK

Sunday, October 29, 1967

Mr. Walter Benedict writes to Dr. King expressing his sympathy for King's incarceration in Birmingham. Benedict plans to show support by fasting and praying during the several days King is in jail.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about Potential Publishers

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

This letter, dated 4/6/65, from Ms. Daves to Dr. King, discusses possible courses of action concerning various elements wanting to publish selections of Dr. King's work. These elements are competing and, in some cases, conflicting. Ms. Daves mentions an upcoming conference in which another matter would be discussed in addition to these.

Outline for Why Does History Move?

Dr. King's sermon outline references Hegel and Marx in relation to questions surrounding the concept of history.

Sabellianism

Dr. King defines "Sabellianism" as the concept of acknowledging God as one entity with three modes.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

Monday, December 11, 1961

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

MLK's Recommendation Letter for Alan Wachtel

This original letter was handwritten and initialed by Dr. King for Alan Wachtel, who he was recommending for law school.

Letter from Esther Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, November 10, 1965

Esther Thompson inquires if Dr. King and his church could be of assistance with helping her blind husband see again.

Pilgrimage to Nonviolence

Dr. King's essay "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" provides a replete account of the thinkers, ideas and sentiments responsible for his pledge to nonviolence.

Birthday Card to MLK

Thursday, January 15, 1959

Elaine Stears and Family wish Dr. King a Happy Birthday.

Letter from Rev. Milton Reid to MLK

Tuesday, January 28, 1964

Rev. Milton Reid invites Dr. King to Petersburg, Virginia to be the speaker at the 190th Anniversary of the First Baptist Church. Rev. Reid mentions to Dr. King that the church holds historical significance because meetings about abolishing slavery were held at the church by Nat Turner and John Brown. Reid asks Dr. King to suggest another speaker if he is unable to accept the invitation.

Memorandum from Theodore E. Brown Regarding 1968 Trip to Nigeria

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Theodore E. Brown, the director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, reports the results of his recent trip to Nigeria to members of the Call Committee.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Susan Stauffer

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Susan Stauffer for her contribution to the SCLC. He states, "such moral and financial support are of inestimable value for the continuance of our humble efforts."

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

Letter from MLK to Mr. G. H. Bishop

Thursday, July 28, 1966

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Mr. G. H. Bishop's financial contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Thank you Letter from MLK

Friday, January 26, 1968

Thank you Letter from MLK to Dr. Jones at Morehouse College for an autographed copy of "A Candle In The Dark"

Letter from Reverend Charles G. Adams to a Fellow Minister about the Concord Towers Campaign

Monday, March 25, 1968

In this letter, Rev. Charles G. Adams requests financial donations to be used for the Concord Towers Campaign in Boston, which is a campaign to benefit certain families currently living in substandard dwellings.

Johnson Said to be Choice of Negroes

Kivie Kaplan, the President of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said that they would be endorsing Johnson for President. Kaplan said their decision was not made lightly, and they will always endorse the candidate who has a principle of equality for all.

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

Letter from MLK to Melvin W. Trent

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King recommends that Melvin W. Trent file a complaint with the Civil Rights Commission about the unjust labor situation in Newport News.

Letter from Alice Mary Hilton and Kathryn Anne Hilton Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Kathryn, a young American girl, writes a letter to Dr. King expressing her sympathy for a girl in the Vietnam War. Kathryn sends twelve cents to help the girl in the war smile. Kathryn's mother also expresses her concern about the war.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

This telegram was sent from Benjamin Elijah Mays and his wife to Dr. King at the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King, thanking him for his financial pledge to the college and asking him to join the Morehouse men who have either paid out their pledges or whose pledges are up to date. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to All Law Enforcement Officials

Saturday, April 1, 1961

In this letter, President Hoover addresses all F.B.I. law enforcement officials. He discusses America's opposition to communism and describes it as an "insidious menace." However, Hoover warns that "attributing every adversity to communism" is ineffective and senseless. Instead he suggests that in order to defeat communism, it must be thoroughly studied and analyzed.