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"Selma, AL"

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, New York (NY), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR), Mississippi (MS), Ohio (OH), CHINA, PHILIPPINES, THAILAND, MALAYSIA, CUBA

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from MLK to William Kivi

Monday, July 17, 1967
California (CA)

In this letter to Mr. William Kivi, Dr. King expresses his view on the representation of the American flag.

Letter from Marc Pilisuk to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN), CANADA

Marc Pilisuk, Associate Professor of Administrative Science and Psychology at Purdue University, requests Dr. King's permission to reprint the book "The Triple Revolution."

Christianity

Dr. King outlines Angus' interpretation of Hegel's views on Christianity in the book, "The Mystery Religion and Christianity."

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Monday, December 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

Letter from David Cole Gordon to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

David Cole Gordon, Consulting Editor for American Humanist Association, requests that Dr. King provide an essay for their upcoming feature, "This is How I Live."

Letter from Norman Walsh to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

Norman Walsh thanks Dr. King for being a spokesperson for Vietnam, poverty, and civil rights.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet Featuring Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967
New York (NY), California (CA), Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Maine (ME)

This document contains speeches given at the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet. Sidney Poitier, a Bahamian American actor, gives the keynote address. He makes a very compelling statement during his address asserting, "to change the world we must change men." Also featured are brief speeches by Dr. King, Andrew Young, and Dorothy Cotton.

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

Support Letter from

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Donna Breiter conveys her support of Dr. King's work within the Civil Rights Movement. Due to her finances she cannot physically attend marches, but she inquirers of other ways to support the efforts.

Letter from Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oregon (OR)

Here Joan Daves gives permission to Mr. Phillip Hanson for the use of words from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait", requested by Philip Hanson.

Letter from Bernhard M. Auer to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961
New York (NY), New York, NY

Bernhard Auer, publisher for Time magazine, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude for Dr. King's role in helping attain accurate information throughout the year of 1961.

Reuther in Praise of Poverty War Funds to Alabama Farmers Cooperative

Monday, May 15, 1967
Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL)

Walter Reuther, president of United Auto Workers, comments on the Office of Economic Opportunity's decision to give financial aid to the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association.

Excerpt from MLK's Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King discusses nonviolent resistance and freedom. He further challenges various communities by coining the slogan, "hate is always tragic."

Telegram From M. J. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Chattanooga, TN, Birmingham, AL

Mr. Jones, Chattanooga affiliate of the SCLC, writes a support letter to Dr. King while he is in jail.

Affidavit of Theo R. Wright

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

In an attempt to redirect the focus of Negro students in Birmingham, Superintendent Theo R. Wright presents a sworn affidavit detailing his responsibilities and plans to revitalize the educational direction of Birmingham Public Schools.

Letter from Congressman Adam Clatyon Powell to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Harlem Representative Adam Clayton Powell informs Dr. King that all of the "War on Poverty" hearings will be cancelled until furtherl notice.

Letter from T. Jansma to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965
NETHERLANDS

The General Secretary of the Baptists in the Netherlands praises Dr. King for receiving an honorary degree from Vrije Unversiteit in Amsterdam and inquires if he is available to deliver any speeches in the Netherlands during the same time period.

Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Stimma

Friday, April 5, 1968

Maria Stimma wrote this letter to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Morality

SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King documents a quote from British statesman John Morley regarding the morality of war. Dr. King refers to the quote, taken from Morley's publication "Recollection," as a "grand, potent monosyllable." Following the citation, Dr. King comments, "This is an agnostic talking."

Who is Truly Great

Dr. King addresses the subject of individual greatness within society and how to truly go about achieving such a status. He begins by dispelling common signifiers of greatness before indicating that greatness can only be substantively measured through the ability to put others before self. Dr. King cites the life of Jesus Christ as an example of humility culminating into greatness.

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

Friday, December 23, 1966
New York, NY

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

Letter from Virginia Madden to Mrs. King

Sunday, October 25, 1964
Philadelphia, PA

Virginia Madden, a 91-year-old white woman from Philadelphia, writes to congratulate Mrs. King on Dr. King's winning the Nobel Peace Prize. She says she has deplored racism and welcomes the new Civil Rights Law.

Subsistance Pay for Voter Workers

Friday, December 31, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Copy of a Crusade for Citizenship disbursement check paid to an Alabama worker in a Voter Registaion program. Reason for disbursement is subsistance pay.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King notes that Kierkegaard reversed the Hegelian dialectic.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Kennedy

Monday, November 28, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, informs Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Dr. King has accepted the invitation to appear before the subcommittee on Executive Reorganization.

Statement by MLK

Virginia (VA), Arkansas (AR), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King discusses the backlash received during the protests and demonstrations for civil rights. He asserts that nonviolence is the most successful weapon, and that in order to participate the individual must be bold, brave, and disciplined.

Letter from Ludovic Luke Barrie to MLK Regarding World Bible Society

In this letter, Ludovic Luke Barrie grants Dr. King the title “Honary President of The World Bible Society, Inc.” for all of his accomplishments.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Monday, December 28, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King thanks Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council for his efforts during Dr. King's visit to Sweden. Dr. King also requests the names of others who he should thank.