The Archive

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"Selma, AL"

Letter from James H. MacDonald to MLK

Friday, June 16, 1967

James MacDonald asks Dr. King to send a statement regarding his personal struggles to assist with the sermon MacDonald will deliver to his congregation. MacDonald also seeks advice on how to integrate his church.

Speech to National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King answers a number of questions from the National Press Club.

Letter from Miss Margaret Scattergood to MLK

Wednesday, January 8, 1964

Ms. Scattergood writes to Dr. King on behalf of Dr. Peter Manniche concerning a proposition to visit Scandinavia and address citizens of Europe. Dr. Manniche asserts "For there is an important service to be done in Europe...and you could contribute so much".

Telegram from MLK to Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King expresses his gratification to Senator Edward M. Kennedy for sponsoring the amendment to abolish the poll tax in state elections.

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Annual Report (Urban America Inc.)

This card references the Poor People's March on Washington of 1968.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

"I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the last speech Dr. King delivered. A day after making this address at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee, he was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Dr. King spoke of faith, nonviolent protest and his support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. He urged both a march and a boycott against Memphis area businesses. Dr. King ended his speech by musing about his previous brush with death and other threats against him.

Letter from Jeffery Goldberg to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

In this letter, Jeffery Goldberg comments on the Vietnam War and requests a copy of Dr. King's speech to Church Laymen.

MLK Statement Before the Credentials Committee of the DNC

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King addresses the Democratic National Committee urging them to stand up against the inequities that prevent Negro participation in the political process in the state of Mississippi.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Sin

On this note card, Dr. King discusses the repercussions of sin according to Albrecht Ritschl.

The Practical Value of Religion

Dr. King writes about Albrecht Ritschl's views on the practical value of religion.

Barth, Karl

Dr. King comments on Karl Barth's view that Christ assumed fallen human nature.

Chicago Defender: My Dream

Saturday, February 19, 1966

Dr. King writes this article for the Chicago Defender describing the social and economic climate of Chicago's ghettos. He explains that Ghettos are the site of economic exploitation and where no exchange of culture and resources are allowed to exist. SCLC staff and Reverend James Bevel "have come to see this as a system of internal colonialism." It is understood that slum culture is designed to perpetuate the inferior educational, health, housing, and employment states of the Negro.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

Order of Contingents In April Parade in New York

This document lists the parade order for an anti-Vietnam war demonstration in New York. It also lists official slogans and regulations concerning the use of signs and placards.

Letter from US Soldiers Lester Hill, James Gardner and Homer Collier to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965

Three Negro soldiers communicate with Dr. King regarding the racial practices of white GIs against fellow Negro GIs. The soldiers feel pressure to not only fight against the enemy but to watch over their shoulders to shield themselves from intimidation against the white GIs. Lester Hill writes on behalf of soldiers requesting Dr. King's help.

Letter from Thomas H. Uzzell

Monday, July 16, 1962

Thomas Uzzell asks Dr. King to read his book entitled, "The Twilight of Self-Government." Mr. Uzzell's book deals with the racial crisis in America and how it "can be solved in a democratic manner."

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK, Clarence Jones and Stanley Levison

Saturday, March 14, 1964

Joan Daves expresses the importance of gaining proper copyright reassignment for Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Request for MLK To Submit an Article for TV Guide

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

TV Guide seeks Dr. King's critique of television's positive contributions to life in the U.S., race relations, and negro life.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves writes Dr. King to express her concern about Miss Hoover contacting Dr. King instead of herself regarding his upcoming book.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from SANE Co-Chair Benjamin Spock to MLK

Friday, April 30, 1965

Dr. Benjamin Spock, acting as co-chairman of the National Committe for a Sane Nuclear Policy, transmits a telegram to Dr. King inviting him to deliver a speech at Madison Square Garden in reference to Vietnam.

Statement on Nonviolence in the South

Thursday, January 10, 1957

This document is a statement addressing the need to combat the growing violence between southern Caucasian Americans and African Americans.

Letter from The Pierre Berton Show to MLK

Thursday, September 17, 1964

Mrs. Elsa Franklin, program organizer for The Pierre Berton Show, invites Dr. King to be a guest on the program. She describes the show as "Canada's foremost television talk show."

Kinloch Citizen's Self-Survey Committee

Sunday, September 15, 1963

A Police Advisory Committee releases its recommendations for the Kinloch, Missouri Police Department.

Letter from President Johnson to Alan Westin

Monday, February 28, 1966

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Professor Alan Westin, of Columbia University, to congratulate him on the formation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Ghettos and Segregation in City Urbanizing

Dr. King writes this speech explaining the current economic and social conditions of city ghettos. As cities urbanize, ghettos expand and segregation increases. "The ghetto has become the hallmark of our major cities just as truly as the cities themselves are becoming the hallmark of the nation." Though the last thirty years has seen advancements in legislation, what remains unrecognized is the gap between legislation intent and the actualization of community programs that have tangible affects on the neighborhoods.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, July 29, 1965

SCLC Vice President-At-Large, Ralph D. Abernathy, grants permission for the release of information to Jesse B. Blayton. Mr. Blayton was Georgia's first black Certified Public Accountant.

Schleiermacher & Ritschl

Dr. King writes notes regarding the philosophies of German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl. King states there is a mixture of attraction and repulsion between the two, as Ritschl is repelled by Schleiermacher's mysticism and attracted to his views on Christianity.