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"Selma, AL"

Letter from Robert Powell to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967
GERMANY, New York (NY)

In this letter, Robert Powell protests Dr. King's participation in a demonstration against the Vietnam War. He also expresses his thoughts on Dr. King's perspective of the war as a "racist war."

Letter from Thomas K. Gilhool to MLK

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

The Fellowship House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania invites Dr. King to be a speaker at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney for her 35 years of service as Director.

Letter from Stanley M. Voice to MLK

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Stanley M. Voice writes to inform MLK why he is withdrawing support for SCLC in 1967. He thinks Negro leaders need a unified sense of direction.

Time

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Letter from MLK to Reverend Earl C. Scott

Thursday, September 13, 1962
Texas (TX)

Dr. King writes Reverend Earl C. Scott expressing appreciation for his words of encouragement and providing Reverend Scott with information regarding his current work towards social justice.

Letter from Sam Garwood Concerning MLK's Involvement with the Vietnam Conflict

Brooklyn, NY

Sam Garwood expresses his opinion on the Vietnam War. It could have a negative effect on the Civil Rights Movement if Dr. King doesn't address the situation in a pleasing way to Americans. He believes that a lot of support gained could be lost due to the War.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. V. E. Moray

Friday, April 14, 1967
INDIA, London, England

Joan Daves gives Dr. Moray permission to publish a Marathi edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Race Role Urged For Girl Scouts

Saturday, February 3, 1962
Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

De. Harold Taylor, former president of Sarah Lawrence College, challenges the Girl Scouts of America to play a greater role in fighting racism in the South. He also suggest that the Girl Scouts work with the Peace Corps to help spread their teachings internationally.

Congratulations to MLK from Michael Engel

Saturday, December 19, 1964
Michigan (MI)

In this letter dated December 19, 1964, Michael Engel sends his congratulations to Dr.King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize. He also asks for a picture of Dr.King for his scrapbook.

Telegram from Marvin Rich to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Marvin Rich informs Dr. King of a resolution that was adopted at a recent conference. The resolution called for a summit of civil rights leaders.

Letter of Inspiration from Dwight Church to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
New York (NY)

Dwight Church informs Dr. King that "actions count more than words." He further shares details about Clayton Powell and the progress of the Irish.

Telegram from Duncan Bradford to MLK

CANADA

Duncan Bradford, the executive secretary for the British Columbia Hospitals' Association, requests for Dr. King to make an address at the national convention to speak out against the atrocities occurring around the word.

King Finds New Target

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY), Kansas (KS)

This article from The Topeka Daily Capital discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King verbalizes his stance after seeing anti-poverty funds being used for war. The article also mentions civil rights leaders who are against joining both causes for civil rights and world peace.

Letter from Albert Duff, Jr. to MLK

Kentucky (KY), Cincinnati, OH, Chicago, IL, ITALY

A former critic of Dr. King pledges allegiance to him after his bold and noble stance against the Vietnam War. Albert Duff, Jr. finally understands that color lines should not be a symbol of divisiveness. Duff feels that the world needs men of Dr. King's courage to speak from the Bible.

Letter to Ms. Hoover from Joan Daves

Wednesday, March 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves writes Miss Carol Hoover of the SCLC to coordinate efforts to market and promote Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Note on MLK Recorded Statement

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Virgina Kassel sends a transcript of a recorded statement by Dr. King. Ms. Kassel provides Dora McDonald of the details related to statement and apologies for any errors on the transcript document.

Letter from Trude B. Feldman to Mrs. King

New York, NY

In this letter Trude Feldman sends Mrs. King a copy of a "piece" on Sammy Davis from "Ebony" and asks that it be returned after review.

Letter from Gwedolyn Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1962
Memphis, TN

Gwedolyn Johnson of Friendship Baptist invites Dr. King to a public speaking engagement held on his behalf. She encourages Dr. King to speak directly to the youth in an effort to increase moral and social activism. She requests a specific date in addition to estimated traveling costs.

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965
New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

The Ben Bella Conversation

ALGERIA, CUBA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King summarizes his recent two-hour meeting with Premier Ahmed Ben Bella of the newly-formed Algerian Republic. He mentions that Ben Bella was intimately familiar with the details of the civil rights movement and repeatedly said or inferred that “we are brothers.” King states that “the battle of the Algerians against colonialism and the battle of the Negro against segregation is a common struggle.” There are international implications for the US if it doesn’t solve its human rights problem: the nation will become a second-rate power in the world.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968
Florida (FL), Orangeburg, SC

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Sin

Dr. King cites a quote from Reinhold Niebuhr regarding sin.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr.

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
New York, NY

Dr. King extended his appreciation to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr. for the letter and copy of Mr. Wood's speech given on the Demonstration Cities Program.

Letter from John A.McDermott to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, invites Dr. King to be a special guest of honor at the annual John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. Theodore C. Sorenson, former Special Counsel to the late President Kennedy, will be the principal speaker at this event. Dr. King received the award two years earlier.

Letterfrom Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College to MLK

Thursday, October 7, 1965
Arkansas (AR)

Haridas T. Muzumdar, Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences at Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College, inquires if Dr. King will have time to have a meeting with him.

Letter from MLK to Saul S. Sherman

Monday, January 3, 1966
Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mrs. Saul S. Sherman for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes how monumental the change for Negroes in the South has been in the last ten years and how revolutionary the future will be thanks to her generous donation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Bennett

Friday, May 13, 1966
Nevada (NV), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald writes Jean Bennett on behalf of Dr. King expressing his regards for offering to donate a substantial portion of the royalties from the recording of "We Ain't What We Was" to an organization of his choice.

Letter from Rev. Lane Barton to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Selma, AL

Rev. Lane Barton, on behalf of Rev. James Pike and the St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission, corresponds with Dr. King in relation to their recent journey to Selma. In this positive affirmation Rev. Barton states, "I pray that the spirit of the living God which is going to and fro in the land and walking up and down in it will grasp us all and refashion us into one truly free and united republic."

Essay on Violence and Nonviolence

The impractical and immoral effect of violence and testimony to the moral power and efficiency of nonviolence are discussed in this essay. Violence is recognized as achieving social justice with great results, but not without damage to society. Although a much tougher way of seeking social justice, nonviolence is a more satisfying lasting solution.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.