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"Selma, AL"

Sin

Dr. King references the biblical book of Numbers regarding the topic of sin.

Dairy Agrees to Double Number of Negro Workers

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Operation Breadbasket shares an article on the organization's letterhead, which appeared in the Chicago Sun-times. The article highlights the end of a boycott after Mellody Dairy announces a decision to more than double its Negro employees.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Letter from Judy Grey to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Judy Grey, a student at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, informs Dr. King of a paper she is required to complete regarding an issue in the South and requests that he provide any information concerning the movement in the South.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Edward Greaves

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Miss Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Edward Greaves that additional copies of Dr. King's sermon entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians" are unavailable. She refers Mrs. Greaves to locate the sermon in Dr. King's newly released book "Strength to Love."

Letter from Richard A. Russell to MLK about Integrated Housing

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

In this letter to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Russell inquires about the Federal Housing Administration's decision on the requirements of housing integration.

Astronomy

Dr. King writes about the smallness of the earth in the great expanse of the universe.

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

Youth in the World of Work

Daniel H. Kruger describes many aspects of current labor trends in regards to automation, education and employment ratios in the United States.

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Saturday, April 29, 1967

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Affidavit of Captain G.V. Evans

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

G.V. Evans, a captain in the Police Department of the City of Birmingham, confirms a series of sit-ins and marches that took place in Birmingham. The nonviolent actions, called Project C, was headed by Wyatt Tee Walker. Captain Evans believes that this conduct will result in serious injury to the police department and the demonstrators.

Letter from J. Campe to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"and "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this letter is enclosed a check and details of expenses for the Italian Edition of "Stride Toward Freedom and "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from Norman R. Snook to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Mr. Norman Snook of the United Christian Center invites Dr. King to come preach at the Ohio State University United Chapel.

God, Knowledge Of (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "How Do We Know God?" from the Journal of Religion.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Mr. Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend a meeting with Dr. K. O. Mbadiwe, former Nigerian Minister, and other Negro leaders in the United States to discuss the increasing conflict in Nigeria.

Letter from Paul D. Metzger to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Paul D. Metzger, President of the Student Association at Central High School, writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at a forum concerning the issues of civil rights in America. Dr. King's response to this invitation is enclosed at the culmination of the letter.

The Many Faces of Black Power

The author identifies several approaches to the notion of Black Power. The author concludes that Black Power is "a programmatic concept capable of objective definition", "it presents many difficulties", and that the negatives have outweighed the positives.

Summary of 1968 Harris Survey Results

Monday, February 5, 1968

This document summarizes the most recent Harris Surveys from 1968, reporting how the American people feel about President Johnson. Topics focused on include the War on Poverty, Vietnam, and Congress.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Maude Ballou

Wednesday, January 23, 1957

Coretta Scott King offers her gratitude to Maude Ballou for her sending a form for a birth certificate.

Anonymous Telegram to President Johnson

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

This telegram, intended for the White House, was sent regarding the treatment of a former African American Secret Service agent, Abraham Bolden, at the federal medical center in Springfield, Missouri. The sender states that President Johnson ought to follow the United States Constitution and restore Mr. Bolden's freedom or face consequences.

The Citizenship Education Program

This newsletter serves as a platform for the Citizenship Education Program. The program is designed to help inform African Americans of their rights as citizens in the United States.

Letter from A White Man to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966

Writing under a pseudonym, "A White Man" lectures Dr. King about the race related conditions of the Chicago Park District. He or she calls this area "Heaven on Earth Surrounded by a Ghetto."

Letter from MLK to Louis O. Kelso

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Attorney Louis O. Kelso for sending him an autographed copy of, "How to Turn Eighty Million Workers into Capitalists on Borrowed Money."

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Sunday, June 18, 1967

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.

Letter from John R. Brescia to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968

John R. Brescia requests to be sent campaign materials and a schedule of Dr. King's speaking engagements.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, April 9, 1967

Dr. King states that the key to an extended and fulfilling life is to live a life that is "three dimensional." He further identifies these dimensions as: "length, breadth and height." Dr. King proclaims these dimensions will ensure a life of self-love, community and love for God.

Letter from Robert Carter and D. John Heyman to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968

The National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing (NCDH) sends Dr. King a report, which examined "where the jobs are and where those who need them most now live." According to the NCDH, the study shows that jobs are not in the same geographic area where Negroes and other minorities live.

Letter from Lucille D. Anderson to MLK inviting him to Philadelphia

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King's presence is requested by Lucille Anderson in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.