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MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Sin

In this set of notecards, Dr. King discusses "sin." Referencing Biblical verses of Psalms 53:2 and 53:3, he says that "these passages seem to be an explicit affirmation of the universality of sin."

MLK Handwritten Draft Letter

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the letter he received providing insights to an unknown problem.

Flight Schedule Proposal for MLK and Party

Henderson Travel Service, Inc. created this suggested flight schedule for Dr. King, Ralph D. Abernathy, Andrew Young, Bernard Lee, and Dora McDonald.

Banner at "Poor People's March," Washington, D.C. June, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Leonard L. Brooks to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Portland campus of the University of Maine requests Dr. King to speak to the student body in support of Choice '68 National Collegiate Presidential Primary.

Statement by MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Letter from Everett McKinley Dirksen to MLK

Monday, July 6, 1964

Everett M. Dirksen expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter and informs him of the satisfaction he received in being an asset in solidifying the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Telegram from the James A. Bailey Family to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

The James A. Bailey family offers its prayers for Dr. King's recovery.

Schleiermacher (The Religious Man)

Dr. King quotes Schleiermacher's views on man's identification with Religion.

MLK Supports New York City Teachers

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Dr. King sends telegram of support to the United Federation of Teachers backing them in their efforts to create better conditions to work and educate students.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eleanor H. Allen

Monday, December 16, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Eleanor Allen regarding assisting a church affected by recent bombings. McDonald encloses the address of Reverend John Cross, Pastor of 16th Baptist Church, in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from Margit Vinberg to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

Margit Vinberg invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be the guests of honor at a luncheon in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the Joint Swedish Press Publicistklubben.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Gandharva Mahavidyalaya 18th Anniversary

Saturday, August 2, 1958

This pamphlet highlights an event being held at the Fine Arts Theater for an 18th Anniversary celebration of the "Gandharva Mahavidyalaya" music and dance ballet. Also included is a list of the board members responsible for the event, as well as information pertaining to the organization itself.

Letter from Albert Duff, Jr. to MLK

A former critic of Dr. King pledges allegiance to him after his bold and noble stance against the Vietnam War. Albert Duff, Jr. finally understands that color lines should not be a symbol of divisiveness. Duff feels that the world needs men of Dr. King's courage to speak from the Bible.

National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket

This schedule for the National Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket provides a description of the topics to be covered during the convention.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

Letter from Edwina Smith to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Ms. Edwina Smith writes Reverend Shuttlesworth regarding a SCLC meeting and encloses a round trip plane ticket.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Thursday, January 17, 1963

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This paper states that segregation is both unconstitutional and immoral. It calls for a face-to-face meeting with the Albany, Georgia City Commission to discuss disposition of cases against the Albany Movement and a commitment to the First Amendment right of peaceful protest; clarification of the city’s position on the recent Interstate Commerce Commission ruling and desegregation of the city’s buses, and establishment of a bi-racial commission to recommend a timetable for desegregating lunch counters, the library, schools, and parks.

Telegram from the Students Union of Aarus University to MLK

Friday, October 16, 1964

The Students Union of Aarus University congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

Sunday, June 5, 1960

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Letter from Vanessa Garrett to MLK

Friday, February 2, 1968

Vanessa Garrett writes Dr. King discussing various problems African Americans face. She seeks advice on how to solve these issues.

Class Syllabus: Sociology of Religion

This portion of a syllabus lists the basic bibliography and outline for the Sociology of Religion course taught by Kenneth Underwood. Included are several well known authors that influenced Dr. King's studies, e.g. Paul Tillich and Reinhold Niebuhr.

Self

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.”

Letter from S. Keith Graham to MLK

Thursday, January 13, 1966

Skyline High School invites Dr. King to attend their annual dance sponsored by the Associated Men of Skyline. The dance is entitled, "The Southern Queen," and may include additional prominent leaders such as President Lyndon B. Johnson.