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Letter from MLK to Willard T. Carter

Friday, December 27, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Willard Carter for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. King states that because of friends like them he can help end racial discrimination and segregation in the South.

"The American Dream"

Tuesday, June 6, 1961
New York (NY), Washington (WA), INDIA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), SPAIN, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA

This transcription of the commencement address delivered by Dr. King at Lincoln University on June 6 1961.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Joseph S. Clark, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, writes Dr. King to request his testimony. Dr. King's speech would serve as a preface to the hearing on public service and private enterprise employment/training programs.

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Thursday, April 27, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

MLK Discusses Plans for the 1963 March on Washington

Wednesday, January 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C.

While in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. King discloses his intentions for the upcoming March on Washington.

Plea for the Poor to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
Georgia (GA)

Signing as "A Poor Person," this author urges Dr. King to remember that poverty transcends race. The author requests that Dr. King help the poor of all races, with an emphasis on promoting voter registration for all poor people.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, SWEDEN, INDIA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Langone

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Langone due to other writing commitments for the next several months, Dr. King is unable to accept his invitation to write an article for his journal, Psychiatric Opinion.

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

Washington, D.C.

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Support Negro Business

Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

This ad by Operation Breadbasket contains a letter from Dr. King promoting support of Negro businesses.

Letter to Rev W. Harold Row from MLK about the Annual Brethren Service Dinner

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Illinois (IL)

In this letter to Reverend Row, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Brethren Service Dinner due to previous commitments with the Washington Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from MLK to Adolf Kriess

Friday, December 7, 1962
California (CA)

Dr. King sends a note of thanks to Mr. Kriess for a poem he sent.

Spelman College Founders Day

Sunday, April 10, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is a program for Spelman College's Seventy-Ninth Anniversary Founders Day celebration, which featured an address by Dr. King.

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

Brochure: "Some Important Fiscal Facts about the SCLC"

This document contains information about SCLC's administration, role, duties, and actions that its staff fulfills with the money donated to the organization.

Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964
Wisconsin (WI)

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Letter from Robert Lee Hill to MLK

Robert Lee Hill writes to inform Dr. King of the discrimination taking place in the United States Post Office. He then requests the help of the Reverend to put an end to it.

Letter from US Attorney Charles L. Goodson to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

U.S. Attorney Charles L. Goodson informs Dr. King that the Justice Department for the Northern District of Georgia intends to work closely with King by offering facilities and assistance.

Letter from MLK to Aileen B. Armstrong

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Berkeley, CA, California (CA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Armstrong for her letter and contribution. He explains the difference her donation will make in the SCLC's efforts to integrate "the Negro into all aspects of American life."

Telegram from Carole Hoover to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Carole Hoover offers encouragement to Dr.King while he is incarcerated in Birmingham.

Letter from Rev. Theodore L. Fischer to MLK

Wednesday, June 23, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Rev. Theodore Fischer of the Comittee on Religion and Race of the Eastern Pennsylvania Synod offers support to end discrimination in housing.

Conditions for Entering the Kingdom

Dr. King opens these sermon notes by discussing a child's behavior and actions. According to King, "a child has the inexhaustible capacity to forgive" and is inquisitive, honest, and open-minded. These are characteristics that adults should possess, which would help them gain entry into the Kingdom.

Map of Morehouse College

These maps are an overview of the buildings located at Morehouse College.

Letter from Everett McKinley Dirksen to MLK

Monday, July 6, 1964
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Everett M. Dirksen expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter and informs him of the satisfaction he received in being an asset in solidifying the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Chicago Daily News: Operation Breadbasket

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL

The Chicago Daily News posts an article highlighting Operation Breadbaskets success in opening up two hundred and twenty four jobs in Chicago's dairy industry for Negroes.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs President Kennedy that he will not be in attendance at a meeting with religious leaders due to another commitment.

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King's sermon "Love Your Enemies" is inspired by the life and message of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, one must love not only those who love them, but also those who attempt to harm them. Dr. King is empathetic towards those who find it difficult to follow this practice, but regards it as necessary.

Schleiermacher and Original Sin

This note card documents a passage from Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith" regarding original sin. Dr. King's note collection contains many cards that reference the theologian's work and ideas.

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.