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"South Carolina (SC)"

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Mary Bonaventure

Ohio (OH), South Carolina (SC)

The author writes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy to express how impressed she was with the events surrounding Dr. King's funeral. She also made a lengthy request for mementos of the funeral service and Dr. King's speeches.

MLK's handwritten notecard regarding Fact

On this notecard, Dr. King cites the definition of the word 'fact' from The Hibbert Journal, July 1933, according to Arthur Darby Nock.

Letter from Representative James H. Scheuer to MLK

Wednesday, February 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Congressman James Scheuer (D-New York) writes Dr. King that he believes progress is finally being made in Selma, Alabama, and he congratulations Dr. Kin on his excellent leadership.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960
Montgomery, AL

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Letter from Wilma Wolsink to MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1966
NETHERLANDS

Wilma Wolsink, an eleven-year-old girl from Holland, writes to Dr. King to express her support. She also requests an autographed photograph.

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966
Utah (UT), Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Pelagianism

London, England

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

Tuesday, October 15, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, POLAND, FORMER YUGOSLOVIA, CZECH REPUBLIC, HUNGARY, CANADA, FRANCE, CUBA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, COLOMBIA, VENEZUELA, South Carolina (SC)

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

Letter from Peggy Hutter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A white college student writes to Mrs. King, expressing her condolences and shock after the death of Dr. King.

Royalty Statement for Strength To Love

New York (NY), New York, NY

This financial document from Joan Daves, an agent of Harper & Row in New York City, references an itemized Royalty statement for Dr. King's book, "Strength To Love."

Letter from Paul Eshelman to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Eshelman writes to Dr. King in support of his efforts toward helping African Americans become "first class citizens."

Support Negro Businesses

Tuesday, November 1, 1966
Atlanta, GA

From November 1966 newspaper ad: "Support Negro Business" advertisement from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

Sunday, April 9, 1967
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.

Education (Its Weakness in the Moral Realm)

Dr. King documents two quotes from St. Augustine's "Confessions." Both quotes address Augustine's view on education and how it affects one's relationship with God and other human beings.

People in Action: The South -- A Hostile Nation

Saturday, May 11, 1963
GEORGIA, Washington, D.C.

In his regular column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the unfair economic conditions of Negroes in America. He further explains how the employment rate of Negroes in America contribute to economic hardships.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Abraham Ribicoff thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and expresses his contentment with the passing of the Civil Rights Bill. Ribicoff hopes for the progression of the nation in providing equal opportunities for all.

Invitation to Ghana's Independence Celebration

GHANA

Dr. and Mrs. King were the recipients of a series of invitations to attend celebratory ceremonies to celebrate the independence of Ghana.

Letter from Steve Rubicz to MLK

Thursday, September 20, 1962
Montgomery, AL, Washington (WA)

Steve Rubicz, of the Student Peace Union at the University of Washington, invites Dr. King to join a "speakers circuit" that will travel to a number of colleges in the Pacific Northwest.

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL)

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Letter from Samuel Abbott to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Samuel Abbott asks Dr. King for a personal favor in writing the preface for his recent publication.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Contracts

Friday, January 29, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

In this letter Joan Daves requests from Ms. McDonald the required signatures from Dr. King for the contract for the Oriya-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait," which is to be published in India.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN), Louisville, KY, Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA, Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL

Rev. Jackson updates Dr. King on his recent activities, how hard he has been fighting for equality for all Americans, and regrets to inform him that he is ill.

Letter From Paul H. Boase

Friday, October 13, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Paul H. Boase writes Dr. King concerning a sermon, recording and publication that he would like to use to demonstrate that the Social Gospel is still alive.

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951
CHINA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

Letter from MLK to Michael Swann

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh, Scotland on selected dates in 1967 and 1968. He assures the recipient of the letter that he is grateful for the invitation, however, he states that he already has commitments on the proposed dates.

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

The Christian Church and Communist Atheism

Missouri (MO), New York (NY)

Helmut Gollwitzer, a Protestant theologian, completes this body of work entitled "The Christian Church and Communist Atheism." The author states that, "socialists may be Christians, but Christians must be socialists."

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.