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"South Carolina (SC)"

Telegram from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dow Kirkpatrick congratulates Dr. King and apologizes for his absence at the event.

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
New York, NY

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King details royalty checks disbursed from the sale of "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, July 23, 1964
New York (NY)

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the Oncken Verlag Publishers should not be permitted to use his "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" because of a previous publishing agreement with the Econ Verlag Publishing Company.

God - II Kings

Dr. King cites II Kings 5:15 as as affirmation of monotheism.

Letter to Melvin Arnold from MLK

Wednesday, December 26, 1962
New York, NY, New York (NY)

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Dr. King informed him that he has enclosed the final draft of the sixteen sermons to be included, in his second book. He also added that he was in the process of working on the final two sermons to be published in the book.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS)

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), New York, NY, Arkansas (AR)

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from Nancy Davison to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Nancy Davison writes Dr. King to thank him for his words published in Ramparts. She writes that she finds it thrilling to be able read his own words instead of quotations used by others out of context. She thanks him for the stance he has taken on Vietnam, for fighting injustice, and for "having the courage to reveal what is in your heart."

Letter from Robert Finarelli to MLK

Wednesday, October 30, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Birmingham, AL

The staff of Edwin H. Vare Junior High School contributes to the SCLC "in remembrance of the Birmingham children who were victims of hate."

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

Protest from Dallas County: Regarding The Community Action Program

Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

This petition from the Dallas County-based Self-Help Against Poverty with Everyone (SHAPE) requests for an immediate investigation into "the problems and circumstances surrounding the efforts for the anti-poverty program" in Dallas County.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Shriver Turnabout on Poverty Project Criticized

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH

William C. Selover writes this article covering the criticism around Sargent Shriver's decision to cut funding for the poverty relief program, Child Development Group of Mississippi. Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, had created Head Start programs and used the CDGM as a model for programs across the country. Several accusations are rendered as cause to the cut, including Shriver giving in to political pressure from segregationist senators of Mississippi. Many believe that once again poor people had "been sacrificed to political expediency."

NAIRO Supports March for Freedom

Washington, D.C.

The National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials declares their support of the March for Freedom in Washington, D.C. NAIRO urges its members to support the march for the integration of over "20,000,000 Americans of minority identity."

Faith As A Way of Knowing (Wieman)

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "The Source of Human Good" on faith as a way of knowing.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Letter from Robert J. McCraken to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963
New York, NY

Reverend McCracken extends an invitation to Dr. King to preach at The Riverside Church in New York.

Notecard Regarding Freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his insights on the concept of freedom.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Baltimore, MD

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Letter from G. Campbell-Westlind to MLK

Wednesday, July 21, 1965
SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA, Stockholm, Sweden, New York (NY)

G. Campbell-Westlind, Acting Consul General of the Royal Consulate General of Sweden, informs Dr. King that Simon & Schuster has asked the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm for permission to print his Nobel Award Acceptance Speech. The letter requests Dr. King's comments on the proposal.

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Boulware

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Mrs. Boulware of Newark, New Jersey expresses her sympathy for Mrs. Coretta Scott King after the death of Dr. King. Boulware mentions that she was one of Dr. King's supporters and was a participant in the March on Washington. She closes by stating that Dr. King "is not dead, he is only resting."

Letter from MLK to Heinz Ehrlick

Thursday, August 15, 1963
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Ehrlick for his encouraging letter and suggestions.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Friday, July 1, 1966
Chicago, IL

This program outlines the prevalent social and economic disadvantages of the Negro population of Chicago. The authors give detailed accounts on the presence of impoverished areas and ghettos that systematically oppress African American opportunities for education, housing, and employment. In the past, Negroes have begged, pleaded, and reasoned with white city officials to change community conditions.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes Alfred Tennyson on the topic of immortality.

Sin

ISRAEL

Dr. King notes that I Chronicles 21:1 says that Satan ordered David to conduct a census but that another account indicates it was the Lord. He questions why it was regarded as sinful to take a census.

Letter from Ada M. Field to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Ada M. Field is a ninety-year-old woman who sent Dr. King her contribution for the year. Ms. Field praised Dr. King, and the SCLC, for continuing to fight for freedom and for bringing a positive light to the process.

Letter from MLK to Fellowship Baptist Church

Friday, May 5, 1967
Chicago, IL

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude for the contribution made by the Fellowship Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois to the SCLC while explaining what the contribution is envisioned to accomplish and what the SCLC has already accomplished.

Letter from the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
SWEDEN

Bolennart Andersson, President of the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden, sends a congratulatory letter and an invitation to Dr. King to speak to their student union.

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

Tuesday, September 28, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, California, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, CONGO / ZAIRE

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.