Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"South Carolina (SC)"

MLK Outline of Biblical Texts

Dr. King outlines the Old Testament biblical book of Samuel and records information regarding the lives of Saul and David.

Letter from Nippon Television Corporation

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Producer Yasuo Yamanaka acknowledges Dr. King's consideration of an invitation to appear on his television program in Tokyo, Japan.

Letter from Ann and George Laringer to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

George Levinger's extends his gratitude to Dr. King for his stand against Vietnam. Levinger states, "One can preach nonviolence at home and ignore the violence abroad."

SCLC Form Letters

The first letter states that Dr. King is out of the city for a few days. The second letter expresses gratitude for the recipient's moral support and Christian generosity.

Telegram from MLK to Honorable Daniel Evans

Dr. King writes to the Honorable Daniel Evans requesting that he intercede in the controversy resulting from Washington State's conservation law and a 111-year old treaty.

The Transcendental Dialectics

Dr. King writes on the "soul" and the "world" as two ideas of reason. He speaks to the human tendency to apply the categories of quantity, quality, relation, and modality to our understanding of the self. King ends these notes by contemplating "two absolutely contradictory propositions [that] seem to be established by the refutation of the other."

Letter from T. M. Benson to MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

A representative from Peak Publications requests Dr. King's permission to use a portion of "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract concerning racial issues and the church. The sender offers a hundred dollars for permission to reprint this section.

Letterfrom Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College to MLK

Thursday, October 7, 1965

Haridas T. Muzumdar, Chairman of the Department of Sociology and Dean of the Division of Arts and Sciences at Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College, inquires if Dr. King will have time to have a meeting with him.

SCLC Press Release About a Mississippi Political Rally

Thursday, February 8, 1962

This press release describes a political rally of Negro voters in Clarksdale, Mississippi at which Dr. King spoke. It declares the need for voter registration and the possibility for Mississippi to have as many as five African-American congressmen in Washington.

Letter from Governor Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

Governor Nelson Rockefeller encloses a contribution of $5,000 to the SCLC and discusses the forthcoming voter registration drive in which the SCLC will conduct.

Letter from Berenice Wiggins to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Wiggins encloses a contribution to the SCLC. She also requests that Dr. King puts out an announcement so that listeners can tune into his radio broadcast on WLIB.

Copyright Agreement for MLK’s Nobel Lecture

This is the Copyright Assignment Agreement established between Dr. King and the Nobel Foundation.

Another Opinion: I Oppose the War in Vietnam

This column contains excerpts from an address given by Dr. King in Chicago, in which he expresses his concerns regarding the Vietnam War and how it will affect poverty in America.

Operation Breadbasket Cost Breakdown

Operation Breadbasket was a division of the SCLC founded in 1962 and operated by Reverend Fred C. Bennett. The project was dedicated to improving the economic conditions of black communities across the United States. This is an estimated cost breakdown for the operation. It includes expected wages, salaries, transportation, insurance, and office supplies for running the project for one year.

Telegram from Muhammed Speaks Newspaper to MLK, Sr.

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Muhammed Speaks Newspaper contacts Martin Luther King, Sr. to confirm the presentation of a portrait of Dr. King, which is a gift of Muhammad Ali.

Letter from Charles V. Arthur to MLK

Tuesday, July 9, 1963

Charles V. Arthur of Vancouver's Kitsilano Secondary School encloses a contribution for the SCLC. He explains that the staff wishes to show appreciation for the efforts of the SCLC.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

Letter from MLK to Ruby Brown

Monday, April 4, 1966

Dr. King writes Ruby Brown of Detroit, Michigan to thank her for her letter regarding the civil rights struggle.

Press Conference Statement on New York

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Dr. King addresses the city of New York and the problem of mounting violence. Dr. King urges the city to help take a stand by promoting social justice through nonviolence efforts and strategies.

Carbon Copy Letter from Dr. King to Joan Daves Regarding rights of "Strength To Love"

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King acknowledges that he is in receipt of Joan Daves letter about the schedule on June 8, as well as, the letter concerning the offer for the Japanese rights of "Strength To Love".

Anglicanism

This note card briefly compares Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism and Calvinism.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Letter from The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967

A member of The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge in Milwaukee informs Dr. King of his study on the Negro voter. The study determined that Mississippi has the most non-registered Negro voters.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Friday, June 7, 1963

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Racism in the United States

Dr. King discusses the issues of racism, Jim Crow and nonviolence in this edition of Current. He further explains that, without the tactic of nonviolence, Negroes can become hostile and bitter. Throughout this issue several other writers are featured including Leslie W. Dunbar, Langston Hughes and Fay Bennett.

Those Who Fail To Speak

Saturday, June 5, 1965

Dr. King discusses the stagnant progress of desegregation despite the fact that a decade has passed since the Supreme Court's ruling on Brown v. Board of Education.

Ossie Davis Defines Blackness and Whiteness

In this document,Ossie Davis uses Roget's Thesaurus and defines the words "whiteness" and "blackness" only to find many positive outcomes for whiteness and an abundance of negative synonyms for blackness.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

Letter from Richard K. Goidel

Friday, March 15, 1968

Mr. Goidel, a student editor, requests a photograph from Dr. King to be featuredd in an article referencing the recent Time Magazine's Choice "68. Dr. King was nominated as a candidate for by Time magazine's Choice '68 collegiate Presidency. Sadly, Dr. King was assassinated two weeks later.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald about obtaining a copy of the speech Dr. King made to the New York City Bar Association.