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"South Carolina (SC)"

Religion

Dr. King quotes Robert Flint’s “The Philosophy of History.”

Man

Dr. King notes the subject of man, quoting Algernon Charles Swinburne's "The Hymn of Man."

MLK's Sermon Outline

Dr. King categorizes different types of Christians.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Wednesday, September 23, 1964
Arizona (AZ), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA)

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Letter from Erma Jewel Hughes to Wyatt Tee Walker

Friday, May 8, 1964
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Erma Jewel Hughes requests Reverend Wyatt Walker to send two thousand copies of the "SCLC Story" to be sold by Erma Hughes Business College. Erma Hughes ensures a protection detail will be assigned to Dr. King during the entire time he is in Texas for the commencement speech given at the college.

Letter from James Shipman to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

James Shipman writes Dr. King to request his presence at the 1st annual meeting for the Education Association for Community-Junior Colleges, as their main speaker. Shipman gives the Reverend option to choose a date convenient for him, a week in either direction from April 20, 1968.

Address to the National Bar Association

Thursday, August 20, 1959
Wisconsin (WI), Milwaukee, WI, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Little Rock, AR, Virginia (VA)

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

The Man Who Was a Fool

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The sermon "The Man Who Was a Fool," was published in the June 1961 issue of the journal The Pulpit. Dr. King delivered the sermon in both Chicago and Detroit in early 1961.

Spelman College Founders Day

Sunday, April 10, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is a program for Spelman College's Seventy-Ninth Anniversary Founders Day celebration, which featured an address by Dr. King.

Letter from Gitta Gossman to Dora McDonald

Friday, February 26, 1965
New York, NY

Gitta Gossman forwards Ms. McDonald two copies of the contract for the Dutch-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King's signature.

Letter from Al Shabazz to MLK

Friday, August 25, 1967
New York, NY

Al Shabazz requests Dr. King review his proposal for Black Independence.

Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

Sunday, December 11, 1966

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elisabeth Babcock

Tuesday, April 27, 1965
New York (NY), Boston, MA, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Elisabeth Babcock regarding the possibility of Dr. King visiting her in New York. Unfortunately, the hectic schedule in Dr. King's travels will not allow him such an opportunity. She conveys their gratitude for the "moral and financial support" Babcock has made for the betterment of the movement.

Letter from Dottie Hughes to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, October 27, 1964
ZAMBIA

Mrs. Hughes, a resident of Zambia, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She informs Dr. and Mrs. King that their efforts are being recognized in Africa.

My Dream: Peace - God's Business and Man's

Saturday, November 27, 1965
VIETNAM, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

This document is a draft in progress of an article wrote for the Chicago Defender. Dr. King conveys his desire for war to be eliminated as an option to solve the nation's problems. He feels that full equality will never come to pass unless solutions involving violence are deemed to be methods of the past.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Monday, July 10, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

TV: Return of Susskind

Monday, October 3, 1966
New York, NY, Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL

This article reviews a series of television shows that aired on various networks dealing with politics and race relations. Among the programs mentioned is a segment featuring Senator Kennedy as well as a documentary entitled "The Agony of Two Cities" centered on segregation.

Statement by MLK in San Francisco

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

Dr. King gives an address in San Francisco regarding race relations, equality, and segregation. Dr. King charges people from all communities to unite so that hope can be created for others.

Press Release for the Southern Negro Leaders Conference

Monday, January 7, 1957
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Florida (FL), Tallahassee, FL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, Rev. C.K. Steele, and Rev. F. L. Shuttlesworth called for an emergency conference to strategize and unify further bus desegregation efforts in the south. This is the press release announcing the meeting of the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-violent Integration. The agenda was ambitious, but specific and explicit. One of the outcomes of the meeting was the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with Dr. King chosen to lead.

Letter from Troy J. Horton to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Troy J. Horton, a teacher at Wilson High School, inquires if Dr. King is interested in speaking to the student body of the school on topics such as racism, prejudice and segregation.

Letter from Benjamin Newman, Jr. to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mr. Newman offers suggestions to Dr. King and Mr. Al Raby regarding voting registration in Chicago.

Letter from Roy Pfaff of Promoting Enduring Peace Inc.

Connecticut (CT), HONG KONG, Tokyo, Japan, Honolulu, HI, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, MONGOLIA

Promoting Enduring Peace Inc. invites friends of the organization to participate in one of their 1968 travel seminars. The three tours consist of the Round-The-World Goodwill Seminar, Soviet Union Tour, Around-The World Across Siberia, Mongolia and Japan. The traveling seminars include conferences, interviews, and other cultural educational features. The organization provides the member with possible materials they could order prior to leaving for one of the seminars.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

CHINA, INDIA, JAPAN, New Delhi, India, New York, NY, SOUTH KOREA, TAIWAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), RUSSIAN FEDERATION

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

The Leaguers, Inc. Ceremony Program

Thursday, May 2, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

This program details the "Ground Breaking Ceremony" of The Leaguers, a Head Start program out of Newark, New Jersey. This organization has continuously provided community services geared towards children and family development. It is also the oldest incorporated African-American non-profit in the state.

Letter from John Moody

Thursday, February 22, 1968
New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., California (CA), Maryland (MD)

Mr. Moody discusses his hopes of creating an event that will demonstrate the phenomenon of Harumbe, with hopes of it becoming a National holiday. The proposed name of this day is "Harumbe", a Swahili term meaning Let's Get Together. Moody suggests May 19, the birthday of Malcolm X, as the date for this event to occur. Additionally, Moody provides an outline for the festivities, and requests that Dr. King contribute his suggestions after reviewing the proposal.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 27, 1963
London, England

H. C. Whitley invites Dr. King to the St. Giles' Lectures during Holy Week, preceding Easter of 1964. The cathedral has experienced some notable leaders and would like to continue their caliber of speakers through Dr. King's appearance.

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details a budget for the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee's Project Administration component.

Letter from James H. Ridgely to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1967
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Attorney Ridgely requests that Dr. King sends his social security number in order for Addison H. Flournoy's federal estate tax return to be filed.

Letter from Willis C. Tabor to MLK

Tuesday, June 15, 1965
Chicago, IL, Selma, AL, Detroit, MI, Pennsylvania (PA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Missouri (MO)

In this letter from Willis C. Tabor to Dr. King Mr. Tabor requests an application for employment with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after his dismissal as pastor of West Side Christian Parish.