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"South Carolina (SC)"

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

Letter from Stanley Lavison to MLK Regarding Speeches

Thursday, March 17, 1966

In this letter to Dr. King, Stanley D. Levison references text books with Dr. King's speeches and The Chicago Rally.

Next Steps In The South

Sunday, July 1, 1956

The Southern Regional Council publishes a pamphlet that addresses the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Case and what its implications mean for society. The pamphlet goes on to answer several questions concerning school integration and gives background information on the case and the issues of segregation.

Letter from the Seventh Grade Class of Woodward School to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Anita Davis, Gail Williams, and Joan Rockwell request an interview with Dr. King for their class project.

Royalty Statement for Strength to Love

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Joan Daves issues this royalty statement for a German language edition of Dr. King's Strength to Love. The statement includes the amount earned and number of copies sold.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

Letter from Ali Beno Veidt to MLK

Saturday, February 26, 1966

Comparing Black Muslims to Nazis, Veidt speaks against Dr. King's practices in the movement, as well as his involvement with Elijah Muhammad. Veidt's correspondence includes a photograph of the two men together.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King, thanking him for his financial pledge to the college and asking him to join the Morehouse men who have either paid out their pledges or whose pledges are up to date. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Ruth N. Smith to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968

Ruth Smith sends a monetary contribution in support of Dr. King's efforts for African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement. She informs him that she will not be physically present for the upcoming demonstration in D.C., but she will support him in spirit.

Telegram from Jack Paley to MLK

Jack Paley informs Dr. King that he has the support of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union as Dr. King works "to win decent treatment for Negroes in public facilities of Atlanta."

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Tuesday, July 13, 1965

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

Letter from Joan Daves to Mrs. Dora McDonald about expenses from trip to New York

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. and Mrs. King extended their stay in New York City to launch his latest book. Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting lodging receipts in an effort to expedite the expense reporting process with Harper Publishing. Handwritten notes on the document suggest that the launch was very successful.

Letters from Irwin G. Perkins to MLK

Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Irwin Perkins, Minister of Donlands United Church, invites Dr. King to visit Toronto for their church's anniversary in the month of October. Perkins expresses their enjoyment of Mrs. King's inspirational visit the previous month and states that his expenses will be covered if he is able to attend.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding voter registration.

Press Statement: MLK Agrees to Moscow Trip Regarding Vietnam

This press release announces that Dr. King has agreed to join with other Nobel Peace laureates for a meeting in Moscow in early October [1967] with the Ambassador of North Vietnam and the Ambassador of the National Liberation Front regarding a possible Vietnam peace settlement. Dr. King will go with Fr. Georges Dominique Pire of Belgium, who won the Peace Prize in 1958. The mission is the result of a private Norwegian initiative with financial backing from the Norwegian government.

"Where Do We Go From Here"-Invoice

Monday, May 22, 1967

This document contains a Harper & Row, Publishers invoice for the sale of four copies of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

Press Release Regarding President Kennedy's Involvement in the Albany Movement

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

Dr. King repeatedly called on the support of the White House in the struggles toward civil rights. In this press release, he addresses the negotiation process in Albany, Georgia and expresses his gratitude for President Kennedy's involvement.

MLK Travel Schedule

This document lists a schedule of cities and dates for Dr. King's travels.

William M. Kunstle writes to MLK About the Shuttlesworht-Phifer Case

Monday, December 16, 1963

William M. Kunstler sends Dr. King the decision marks from the Shutllesworth- Phifer case. The case resulted in a victory, but took five years to draw a decision.

Letter from MLK to AJ Muste

After considerable thought and prayer, Dr. King informs the recipients of this letter of his decision to travel to the Soviet Union under the sponsorship of the American Baptist Convention. He conveys his sense of duty as a Negro leader to speak to Baptists in Russia.

Letter from Walter G. Pietsch to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Walter G. Peitsch asks Dr. King to support a resolution to reinstate Adam Clayton Powell to his seat in the United States House of Representatives and his Chairmanship of the United States Committee on Education and Labor.

The Irish Echo: Ann Daly's Corner

Saturday, June 15, 1963

Ann Daly, a writer for the Irish Echo newspaper, reviews Dr. King's "Strength to Love" and recommends that her readers get a copy of it. She notes that the Irish community should be sympathetic to the plight of Negroes in Alabama because their Irish ancestors also endured oppression. She also gives her opinion on a Gaelic society publication, a book for teenage boys, and recent Irish cultural events.

Response Letter from Dr. King to Irene Kohlmeyer

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King is responding to Iren Kohlmeyer's request to rebroadcast the transcripiton of the address at John Hopkins University. Dr. King gladly informs Kohlmeyer that permission is granted to do the rebroadcast.

Letter from MLK to Ray Stewart

Dr. King thanks Ray Stewart for a song written in tribute to the Freedom Movement, but states that neither he nor the SCLC can underwrite the requested fee for use of the song.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Letter from Smithsonian Institution to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, invites Dr. King to attend the bicentennial birthday celebration of the organization's founder, James Smithson.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."