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Letter from Robert N. Balkind to Andrew Young

This document is a letter of condolence written by the chief executive of a manufacturing company and addressed to Andrew Young, mistakenly listed as head of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). The writer laments Dr. King's assassination and offers a contribution in his "name, honor, and memory."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

Public Affairs Memorandum

Monday, December 27, 1965

Vice President Humphrey is quoted as saying, "This is a pragmatic program - what's best is what works", in describing the Office of Economic Opportunity program. This public affairs memorandum details the efforts of the organization as it pertains to the anti-poverty movement.

Recommendation Letter for Mrs. Lillie Hunter from MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966

Dr. King drafts a letter of recommendation for a former employee, Lillie Hunter.

Sin I and Sin II

Dr. King cites scripture in examining concepts of sin.

The Role of the Church in the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma

This handwritten draft represents the first part of Dr. King's address entitled, "The Role of the Church in Facing the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma," delivered at the Conference on Christian Faith and Human Relations in 1957. Dr. King begins his address by discussing the scientific and technological advances that have taken place in America and how this progress has influenced economic growth. He asserts that this is the nation is dealing with a "chief moral dilemma."

Letter from Bent Ostergaard to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Mr. Ostergaard, a representative of the Danish section of Amnesty International, invites Dr. King to speak publically at a Copenhagen Cathedral. He also invites Dr. King to participate in a local tour to bear witness schools and various social institutions. The document concludes with an additional letter addressed to Dr. King's assistant Miss D. McDonald.

Statement on the Indictment of MLK

Thursday, March 3, 1960

The "Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr." issued this statement, accusing the state of Alabama of falsely distorting Dr. King's 1958 income tax return in an attempt to indict him.

Statement by MLK & Dr. W. G. Anderson

Wednesday, July 25, 1962

Dr. King and Dr. Anderson release a statement declaring a "Day of Penance" for those in the Negro community who have not yet adopted the nonviolent strategy.

Letter from West Virginia NAACP to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1962

William M. Grayson informs Dr. King that he is seeking information regarding his availability to attend a speaking engagement.

Telegram from Ruth Peggy and Cheri Bryant to MLK

Saturday, December 23, 1967

Ruth Peggy and Cheri Bryant express their gratitude for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's assistance.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Anti-Slavery and Reform Papers

Harvest House Limited, a publishing company, announce the release of Henry David Thoreau's essay collection regarding anti-slavery and reform.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.

Jesus

Dr. King highlights the significant characteristics of Jesus Christ.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding "Camp In At the United States Senate"

Friday, October 27, 1967

In this letter, Lucious President share his opinion about Dr. King's actions at the Senate. "A massive camp in at the United States Senate is contrary to God's teaching. You will not have God on your side."

Looking Forward: The Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc.

This pamphlet outlines the ten points the Montgomery Improvement Association uses to promote healthy race relations.

Letter from John A. Bodkin to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

John Bodkin writes Dr. King regarding the speech Dr. King delivered at Riverside Baptist Church in New York detailing his views on the war in Vietnam.

Meister Eckhart

Dr. King outlines a brief history of German mystic philosopher Meister Eckhart.

The Practical Value of Religion

Dr. King writes about Albrecht Ritschl's views on the practical value of religion.

Letter from MLK to Lavera Davis

Monday, March 1, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church to speak at an upcoming Civil Rights Day event.

Press Release: MLK Demands US Action Against Killers of Negroes in Orangeburg, S.C.

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Dr. King's telegram to United States Attorney General Ramsey Carlk was reprinted in this press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In it, Dr. King urges the Justice department to take proper legal action against the perpetrators of violence against Negroes following the wounding and killing of 37 to 50 students in Orangeburg, South Carolina.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Dr. King praises President John F. Kennedy for his eloquent appeal for freedom and justice and says the President's message will become "a hallmark in the annals of American history" if his proposed legislation is passed.

Reason

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Bible regarding reason.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Levi Eshkol to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Levi Eshkol, the Prime Minster of Jerusalem, welcomes Dr. King to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.