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Statement by MLK on the U.S. Stand in Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Dr. King discusses how to involve the public in discussions regarding the Vietnam War. He states that the public should be educated about the history and issues of the war.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to Lyndon B. Johnson

Saturday, May 6, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to President Johnson suggesting a program to help end the war in Vietnam. Smedley urges President Johnson to implement the plan to bring an end to the longstanding fight.

Telegram from MLK to Sheraton Lincoln Hotel

Monday, October 9, 1967

Dr. King makes a reservation with the Sheraton Lincoln Hotel in Texas.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

Tuesday, October 1, 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Notecard- Collective Egotism

In this notecard, Dr. King is outlining Nicbuhr's view of collective egotism.

MLK Draft from Strength to Love: The Answer to a Perplexing Question

Here is a draft chapter from Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" in which Dr. King discusses that the casting out of evil in human lives requires "both man and God."

Letter from Attorney General Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Attorney General Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a copy of his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee about civil rights legislation.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

Saturday, January 30, 1965

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Refinement by Fire

R. Elizabeth Johns describes the events surrounding voter registration in the South and tactics used by civil rights and opposition leaders.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Albert Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation" on the place Christ holds in Christianity as its historical founders.

Letter from MLK to Dr. William H. Allen regarding kind letter

Tuesday, October 15, 1968

Dr. King sent this thank you letter to Dr. William Allen for the prayers and well wishes expressed to Dr. King, as he recovered from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem in 1958. He also conveyed to Dr. Allen that he had been making great progress in his health and anticipated rejoining those working hard in the fight for equality.

If I were a Negro

Thursday, March 23, 1967

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

Carbon Copy of Letter from Melvin Arnold to Joan Daves

Monday, September 16, 1963

In this letter, Melvin Arnold, a representative of Harper & Row Publishing, clarifies and corrects sales and advertising figures related to Dr. King's book, "Strength of Love". The letter refers to a telephone conversation between Arnold and Joan Daves, a literary representative of Dr. King, in which advertising and promotion figures were discussed. Arnold uses the letter to justify the disappointing 18% sales outlay decided on by Dr. King's publisher.

Notecard Regarding Freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his insights on the concept of freedom.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Letter from Bible Student to MLK

The bible student who wrote this letter used biblical references to justify segregation and to persuade Dr. King to cease civil rights demonstrations.

MLK Sermon: The Dimensions of A Complete Life

Sunday, April 19, 1959

In this sermon given at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King details the three dimensions of a complete life: length, breadth, and height.

Letter from MLK to Howard O. Eaton

Wednesday, December 29, 1965

Dr. King writes Howard Eaton to explain that he will have his assistants read and brief him on the document due to his limited amount of time. He expresses that the document is a worthy contribution to the movement and he and his staff are appreciative.

Letter from C. R. Sanders to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Carl Sanders informs Dr. King that the WSPA station is extending him an opportunity to respond, to an adverse editorial that will be aired.

Letter from Rabbi Joel S. Goor to MLK

Tuesday, July 28, 1964

Rabbi Joel Goor extends his appreciation to Dr. King for being able to participate in SCLC's 1964 desegregation campaign in St. Augustine, Florida. He feels that his involvement in the civil rights movement spirtitually enhances his role as an active religious leader. Rabbi Goor encloses a donation to the SCLC for assisting with his bail while being jailed in St. Augustine and a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King to autograph.

MLK's Annual Report to SCLC Convention

Friday, October 2, 1964

As President of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers his Annual Report to the Eighth Annual Convention in Savannah, Georgia. In addition to listing SCLC's many accomplishments over the past year, Dr. King urges his audience to stay resolute as their great progress creates a growing racial backlash from those opposed to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Howard W. Rogerson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Howard W. Rogerson of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights writes Dr. King seeking his opinion and advice regarding a "technical publication for disseminating information on current activities and publications in the field of civil rights."

Royalty Statement for "Strength To Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement reference royalties from Dr. King's french-language edition book, "Strength To Love", published by Castermann s.a.

Letter from Robert Johnson to MLK

The author requests Dr. King to encourage black people to put away their wickedness so the Lord can take care of them.

Letter from Arthur Spence to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Spence writes Dr. King defending the critical perceptions that some whites hold of blacks. As an African American, Spence feels that some members of his race have developed bad habits.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, April 16, 1967

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.