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Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Makola

Dr. King thanks Mr. Makola for reminding him of the "injustices and inequalities" Negroes face both in the United States and South Africa. Dr. King asserts that the issues Negroes face are symptoms of a deeper issue involving foreign policy and that his current focus is on the Vietnam War.

Special to the New York Times: A Cry of Hate or a Cry for Help

Dr. King addresses the recent riots occurring in the county of Watts near Los Angeles. He believes the riots are not solely race-driven but are also motivated by unemployment. The riots are utilized as a way to be heard, and not as a way to destroy.

Response from MLK to Paul Yeiter

Monday, January 8, 1968

Dr. King responds to Yeiter's questioning of his support of plans to boycott the 1968 Olympic games. Dr. King argues that Negro athletes have presented specific and reasonable demands to the Olympic Committee, which reflects a valid concern for the social welfare and progress of the whole nation. He commends these athletes for their determination and courageous stand against racism and injustice.

Mr. Reed, Mr. Baldwin and Slums

Dr. King writes a story pertaining to a Mr. Reed and Mr. Baldwin to describe the importance of keeping after one's soul.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Roy Wilkins writes Dr. King requesting that Southern Christian Leadership affiliates overflow senators with messages promoting support.

Pragmatism

Dr. King documents a J.B. Pratt quote from "What is Pragmatism."

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. N. W. Christian

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Mr. Christian on Dr. King's behalf. She acknowledges his disagreement with Dr. King's philosophy and refers him to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for answers to his questions.

Letter from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK

Tuesday, October 23, 1962

Dow Kirkpatrick, Pastor of First Methodist Church in Evanston, Illinois, invites Dr. King to dinner during his visit to Evanston.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

Thank You Note from Atlanta Braves' President to MLK and Coretta Scott King

Friday, October 27, 1967

William C. Bartholomay, chairman and president of the Atlanta Braves, thanks Mr. and Mrs. King for sending him a recording of the "March on Washington."

Letter from MLK to Robert J. McCracken

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Dr. King declines to preach twice on one Sunday at Riverside Church in New York City. Besides time constraints, he needs to conserve his strength as per his doctor's recommendation. Because the 1964 World's Fair will be in New York at that time, they expect big crowds, requiring two services.

Letter from John G. Hodgson to MLK

Thursday, August 4, 1966

John G. Hudson requests that Dr. King use Hodgson Travel Service for an upcoming trip to the Holy Land.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

H.D. Bollinger is honored to have Dr. King as a speaker for their Eighth Quadrennial Methodist Student Movement Conference at the Municipal Auditorium. Mr. Bollinger communicates with Dora McDonald the details of Dr. King's trip. He also informs her that they will cover the travel expenses for Dr. King's assistant and have received the items he requested. In an additional letter a month later, the director of the conference notifies Miss McDonald that they are in need of five additional photographs and the address of Dr. King.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Thursday, August 6, 1964

Joan Daves requests clarification regarding Dr. King's schedule.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, April 9, 1967

Dr. King states that the key to an extended and fulfilling life is to live a life that is "three dimensional." He further identifies these dimensions as: "length, breadth and height." Dr. King proclaims these dimensions will ensure a life of self-love, community and love for God.

Letter from Unknown to MLK

This letter from an unknown author advises Dr. King to conduct the largest voter registration drive in an effort to elimate poverty. According to the author, "Politicians understand the ballot."

MLK Speaks Before the NAACP at Winston-Salem

Sunday, October 15, 1961

This program for the Winston-Salem branch of the NAACP highlights Dr. King as the guest speaker.

Fichte on God

Dr. King references Kantian protege Johann Gottlieb Fichte and philosophically defines God as the "moral order of the universe."

King Seizure

This article reports on the seizure of a Chicago property by Dr. King.

Man

Dr. King interprets Jeremiah 51:17 to mean that man compared to God is stupid and man's knowledge compared to God's infinite knowledge is nothing.

Letter from Herman Will, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Herman Will, Associate General Secretary for the Division of Peace and World Order, General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church expresses his appreciation to Dr. King.

Science (Definition)

Dr. King records a definition of science.

Letter from MLK to Ralph McGill

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Dr. King writes to Ralph McGill of the Atlanta Constitution to clarify his position on the Vietnam War. Dr. King considers his objection to the war to be a matter of conscience, and not one of political expediency.

Letter from Lewis W. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

Lewis W. Jones worries about Dr. King because of the recent turmoil he has faced. He hopes that the struggles King has faced recently does not undermine his position in the movement.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Joanne Baker

In this letter, Dr. King offers his instructions and a statement pertaining to the history of the "Negro Revolution of the 1960's," including a statement on the Watts and Harlem riots.

Letter from James Gilliam to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1961

Mr. Gilliam sends Dr. King financial support in the amount of fifty dollars.

Letter from Mrs. Ross D. Davis to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966

Mrs. Davis invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker for the Women's National Democratic Club.