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Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1968

Roy Wilkins, of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, wrote Dr. King to explain his increasing concern over the violence in Nigeria. Wilkins requests Dr. King's presence for a meeting with Nigerian Leaders to discuss the possibilities of ending the hostilities.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Leon Margolis

Tuesday, December 3, 1963

Dr. King addresses a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Margolis to thank them for their son Jonathan's donation of one week's allowance to the SCLC. He explains what this and other donations enable the SCLC to accomplish.

Letter of Condolence from MLK

Friday, November 22, 1963

Dr. King expresses his grief as a result of President Kennedy's assassination.

Letter from Don Edwards to MLK

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Representative Don Edwards of California sends his gratitude to Dr. King for a recent letter. Edwards informs Dr. King that they are currently drafting legislation to amend the Civil Rights Act.

Letter from Lillian Smith to MLK

Thursday, July 7, 1966

Lillian Smith, author of 'Strange Fruit,' writes Dr. King to tell of her current health condition. During this time Ms. Smith was battling breast cancer, and was hopeful she would recover. Smith requests Dr. King to visit upon her return home to Clayton County.

150 Religious Leaders March on OEO

Friday, October 14, 1966

This press release addresses Sargent Shrivers' decision not to refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi and to express concerns regarding the National War on Poverty.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Richard Nixon

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

Dr. King and fellow clergymen commend Vice President Nixon on his work bringing attention to the suffering Hungarian refugees in Austria. They urge him to take a similar trip to the South and meet with the thousands of victims of racial oppression.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald Regarding Dr. King's Biological Sketch

Monday, January 22, 1968

This letter from Robert L. Green, Associate Professor, Michigan State University to Dora McDonald is to request copy of Dr. King's biographical sketch to be forwarded to an individual at Yeshiva University. The biographical sketch will be used in conjunction with Dr. King's paper "The Role of Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement" which will be published in the American Psychological Association Journal and the Journal of Social Issues.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

Sensuality

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man" on pride as the basic sin and sensuality the result of pride.

Mysticism

Dr. King cites a passage from American philosopher William Ernest Hocking's "Meaning of God in Human Experience," in which he discusses various forms of mysticism.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Greenstein

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King sends thanks to Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Greenstein for a contribution made to the SCLC.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from MLK to Nelson A. Rockefeller

Monday, November 1, 1965

Dr. King thanks Governor Nelson Rockefeller for taking the pulpit at Ebenezer Baptist Church for their Men?s Day Observance. He appreciates the Governor?s contribution of $25,000 to their tax exempt Society to match his own donation from the Nobel Peace Award.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

This was sent to Dr. King from Abram Eisenman, who is running for President of the United States in 1968. He asks for Dr. King's support in running for president and presents his case on why he should be president.

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King stating that the Methodist Church of Brazil is eager to have him as the Centennial speaker. McCoy believes that Dr. King can share his wisdom with Brazil leaders regarding the social conditions in America.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from Wilson Woodbeck to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967

Mr. Woodbeck invites Dr. King to be an honorary member of the National Association of Negro Musicians. For Dr. King’s review, several letters are enclosed complimenting the organization on their work and contribution to society.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Wednesday, April 4, 1962

Vernon R. Byrd invites Dr. King to be the speaker at the Annual Men's Day Service at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church in Bermuda.

Letter from Orville Freeman to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

The author informs Dr. King of the efforts being made to adequately address the issues pertaining to nutritional health in the country.

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

Letter from Sandy F. Ray Regarding "Holy Land Pilgrimage"

Monday, July 17, 1967

Sandy F. Ray, president of Concreta Tours writes a letter sharing the details concerning Dr. King's Holy Land Pilgrimage. She explains that an office representative recently returned from the Middle East "with first hand information regarding tour conditions there." This document includes a report on hotels, roads, inhabitants, and basic information permitting travel to Israel and the West Bank of Jordan.

Cloudy Summit

Sunday, January 15, 1967

In this article, Mr. Randolph organizes a conference of Negro leaders to take action in the suspension case of Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

Letter from Gordon Bryant to MLK

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

Gordon Bryant, a representative of the Parliament of Australia, extends an invitation to Dr. King to assist the Aboriginal people of Australia in gaining equal rights.

Sin

Dr. King highlights a definition of sin according to Reinhold Niebuhr.

Letter from Dr. King to Mr. David George Ball

Thursday, October 23, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. George Ball, of the Yale University Christian Association, for the kind outpouring of support during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Letter from W. A. F. Braem to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mr. Braem writes Dr. King emphasizing the importance of self-reliance. Braem list some issues that Civil Rights leaders should pay attention to such as education.