Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Tallahassee, FL"

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

Sunday, September 14, 1958
Brooklyn, NY, Montgomery, AL

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Mississippi (MS)

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

Letter from Mrs. Glenn Durbin to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968
New York, NY, Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Glenn Durbin writes to Dr. King expressing her opposing views on Communism.

Letter from Sharon J. Brown to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Sharon Brown, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King how his congregation worships. She explains that this question is for a class project.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK Manuscript

Thursday, March 9, 1967
New York, NY, ECUADOR

In this letter, Genevieve Young informs Joan Daves of the notes created for the manuscript of Dr. King's book and questions about the sources of some of Dr. King's facts.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Supporters

Atlanta, GA

Ralph Abernathy, Treasurer of the SCLC, informs SCLC supporters of Dr. King's newly published book, "Strength To Love." He explains that Dr. King has assigned a large portion of the royalties to further the work of the SCLC and urges supporters to order the book.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN)

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Letter from June Alder to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Alder expresses her support and concern regarding integrated housing.

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

God

This scripture, deriving from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah, illustrates God as holy.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Philip Hiat

Friday, February 8, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King responds to Rabbi Hiat's suggestion to provide an "opportunity for dialogue between Jewish and Negro religious leadership." In addition to confirming his participation in the dialogue, Dr. King commits to sending an additional letter with the names of "men who have much to contribute" along with some potential subject headings for the agenda.

Letter from Jack Tatum to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 13, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Jack Tatum lets Ms. Dora McDonald know that he will be in Atlanta from November 16th-20th, 1967. He states that he would appreciate a meeting with Dr. King and the SCLC executive staff.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Southern Christian Leadership Resolutions

Friday, June 30, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Chauncey Eskridge sends Andrew Young resolutions related to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Mr. Eskridge explains that an examination into the foundation's tax exempt status by the IRS prompted his letter.

Letter from David Morgan to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

David Morgan writes this letter of condolence to Coretta Scott King following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from George G. Hill to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
Hartford, CT

George Hill expresses that he will continue to support the SCLC but feels the need to make two suggestions regarding the Alabama boycott and Vietnam War. He questions the use of economic force in obtaing equal rights and suggests the need to connect with underprivileged around the world.

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Birmingham, AL

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Mysticism

Dr. King cites a passage from American philosopher William Ernest Hocking's "Meaning of God in Human Experience," in which he discusses various forms of mysticism.

Letter of Recommendation for Sally Cantor

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. W. M. Taylor, an English teacher at Grady High School, writes a letter of recommendation on behalf of Sally Cantor, a Russell H. Bull Scholarship applicant.

The Bill of Rights Poem

Monday, July 30, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. Alfred G. Suarez writes a poem regarding the necessity of the Bill of Rights.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jutson Sapp

Friday, July 10, 1964
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Mr. Sapp expressing how unhappy he is concerning Mr. Sapp's difficulty in receiving assistance from the Social Security Program.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

An Open Letter to Free Americans

Memphis, TN, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

In response to Dr. King's assassination, the author urges "Free Americans" to join the fight against racism.

Letter from Kenyan Student to MLK

Monday, March 5, 1962
PUERTO RICO, KENYA

A student writes Dr. King expressing support for his movement and social views in regards to Civil Rights.

Hegel

Dr. King references German philosopher, George Hegal, in this handwritten notecard.

Letter from MLK to George Murphy

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy for giving witness in Albany, Georgia. Dr. King also comments on an upcoming vote and the role of churches in race relations.

Telegram from Margaret Saunders to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960
Columbus, OH, Atlanta, GA

Margaret Saunders sends a telegram to encourage Dr. King while he is in jail.