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Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, February 10, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, contacts Dr. King again about speaking at the organization's annual meeting. She informs Dr. King that she needs a response soon in order to put the information in the newspaper.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1966
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Bayard Rustin invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders for a meeting that will be held in New York, NY.

February 1968, Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, writes to announce the endorsment of Reverend S. M. Sam Davis at their candidate for bishop.

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Ms. Alma Davis of the A.M.E. Church of Alabama, annouces Reverend S. M. Sam Davis as their candidate for bishop. As a member of the Davis Boosters' Club, she attempts to solicit support for Reverend Davis. The Boosters' Club will feature Mrs. Lucinda Brown Pobey and Mrs. Willie Mae bell in a special financial event.

Letter from United States Congress to MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Los Angeles, CA

Joseph McDade writes Dr. King to solicit his views regarding the affects of organized crime on the plight of the urban poor. test_1_4_2:58pm

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Birmingham, AL

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

United Nations Association-Hawaii Chapter

Monday, April 8, 1968
Honolulu, HI

The card, shown here, is an expression of condolence and gratitude from the Hawaii chapter of the United Nations Association, in the form of a "lei of love".

SCLC Revel Report

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this report, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference provides the strategic planning for a nationwide program aimed at educating African Americans on nonviolence principles.

New York Times: US Judge Forbids A House Inquiry; Panel is Defiant

Tuesday, August 16, 1966
VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This article discusses the decision of a federal judge, ordering the House Committes of Un-American Activities to not hold a hearing on a bill that would make it illegal for Americans to aid the Vietcong.

Letter about Publication with Reprint of MLK's Remarks

Thursday, December 28, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Paul Kurtz, the editor of the Humanist, asks Dr. King to look over and comment on the enclosed copy of his piece that will be printed in Humanist.

Theology and Science

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as a source on theology and science.

Suffering

Dr. King notes that Deuteronomy 8:3 suggests that the purpose of suffering is to teach higher spiritual truths.

Immortality

Dr. King references Thomas Carlyle regarding the topic of immortality.

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962
Iowa (IA), Mississippi (MS), Missouri (MO)

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

Capitalism

Dr. King references Karl Marx's thoughts on capitalism.

MLK Urges the Vice President to Visit the South

Thursday, June 13, 1957

Dr. King informs the press that he is articulating plans with the SCLC to launch a campaign to prepare the Negro community for the 1958 election. Dr. King appeals to Vice President Richard Nixon to perform three duties to aid the practice of justice and freedom in the United States. The first of the three involves personal appearances of Nixon to speak to the people of the South about civil rights. The second duty asserts Nixon's initiation of the United States Constitution to support the Negro's voting rights.

Letter from Walter G. Pietsch to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Walter G. Peitsch asks Dr. King to support a resolution to reinstate Adam Clayton Powell to his seat in the United States House of Representatives and his Chairmanship of the United States Committee on Education and Labor.

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Proclaim Liberty...

Atlanta, GA

Carl T. Rowan, one of the most prominent black journalists of the 20th century, is honored at the Progressive Club in Atlanta, GA. This reservation form was sent out to invited guests of the celebration.

Dagmar Wilson: Women Strike for Peace

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., SWITZERLAND, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

This flyer informs readers about Women's Strike for Peace and details about an upcoming talk by Dagmar Wilson.

Letter from Mary Tumbull to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
Ohio (OH), Columbus, OH, Chicago, IL

Mrs. Turnbull expresses her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their hard work in human rights.

Letter from David Segal to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

David Segal writes Dr. King enclosing books his wife purchased from the School of Library Services at Columbia University.

Statement by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee on the Kerner Commission Report

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

This statement put forth by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee addresses the results of the Kerner Commission Report, in which the author stresses that without creating viable and integrated communities in our cities "we shall have no cities".

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Sadye Brooks

Friday, April 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to the Brooks family on the recent loss of their beloved husband and father.

Letter from Rene Golcochen to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

Rene Golcochen offers condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

The Negro Heritage Library

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), BURUNDI, CAMEROON, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, CHAD, CONGO / ZAIRE, ETHIOPIA, GABON, GAMBIA, GHANA, GUINEA, Co'te D'IVOIRE / IVORY COAST, KENYA, LIBERIA, MALAWI, MALI, NIGER, NIGERIA, RWANDA, SENEGAL, SIERRA LEONE, TOGO, UGANDA, ZAMBIA

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Roebuck

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King informs Mr. Roebuck that he has misplaced Mr. Roebuck's check intended for the "Freedom Movement," and thanks him for his support while requesting a replacement check.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965
Washington, D.C., California (CA)

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Los Angeles, CA

In a statement to the Democratic National Convention, the authors of this document proclaim that they are seeking freedom. They say that immediate change will only come if the elected Chief Executive is committed to giving life to the Constitution. In an attempt to achieve this, they request that all of the Presidential nominees meet the people's delegation.

Letter from the Inmates of Cook County Jail to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967
Chicago, IL

The inmates of Cook County Jail request Dr. King's help in fighting certain injustices in the criminal system. The writer informs Dr. King that he may contact Ms. Juanita Whiltfield for more details.