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Address to the Montgomery Improvement Association

Monday, December 5, 1955
Montgomery, AL

Dr. King discusses the inequality in America and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. He says that he will work to eliminate discrimination in Montgomery and he encourages the audience to participate and actively seek change as well.

Telegram from Women's Auxillary of the Chicago NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The Women's Auxiliary of the Chicago Branch of the NAACP informs Dr. King he will be the recipient of their 1966 Humanitarian Award.

Letter from MLK to L. LeVard Colbert

Friday, December 27, 1963
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks L. LeVard Colbert for his contribution to SCLC. Dr. King states that his donation will be utilized to assist with voter registration and ending segregation in the South.

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Richard Millard Congratulates MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Richard Millard, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Boston University, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Building A New Mississippi

Mississippi (MS)

This series of photos represent a plan to help rebuild Mississippi. The photos provide a blueprint and outline for strategical efforts to eradicate poverty and voting concerns.

Information about Poor People's Campaign

VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King writes notes on perceiving God using Nelson Henry Wieman's text, "The Source of Human God."

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

Letter from A Friend to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967
Florida (FL), EGYPT

In this letter, "a friend" to Dr. King offers suggestions to help the black race become more valuable to society.

Philosophy Reading List

This document serves as the reading list of various philosophers. Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and more are apart of Dr. King's philosophical reading from October through January.

MLK on Danville and the Problem of Violence

Friday, July 12, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King discusses his perception of the nonviolent movement, and how the leadership maintains control even though minimal violent outbreaks may occur.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), New York, NY

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Geraldine Fones

Friday, January 12, 1968
London, England

Ms. McDonald informs Ms. Fones that Dr. King will not be able to speak to the Oxford Union Society in London due to commitments in the United States around the same time frame.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Milwaukee, WI

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

A Message from Jail

Saturday, July 21, 1962
Albany, GA

After being arrested and charged with parading without a license, Dr. King wrote a column from jail. The column shared his and Ralph David Abernathy's decision to serve the jail sentence instead of paying a fine of $178.

Introduction of Edward M. Kennedy

Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King introduces Robert Kennedy at a gathering in Jackson, Mississippi, calling him a "capable statesman" with a "great social vision."

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Event Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This program outlines the events for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Georgia (GA)

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Letter from Dave G. Pettigrew to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dave Pettigrew, the Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at the University of South Florida, invites Dr. King or "any of his representatives" to speak to the University. If someone is able to attend, Pettigrew requests information on their candidate and their potential responses to the three referendum questions listed.

Letter from Student Supporter Richard Hathaway to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Richard Hathaway, a student at Haverford College, requests a copy of a speech Dr. King delivered at the United Nations Plaza. Hathaway was a participant in the march and rally at which Dr. King spoke, but was unable to hear the speech because of the crowd.

Ex-West Sider

Chicago, IL

The author discusses their experiences with living in substandard housing in a low socioeconomic environment. The author also questions the racial focus of Chicago's appeasement to the Negro.

Letter from MLK to Mr. J.G. Anoma

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Mr. Anoma for his monetary contribution to the SCLC. In addition, he praises Mr. Anoma for his poem entitled "Black Chicago". The poem addresses the current struggle faced by many "dark-skinned Americans" and reaffirms the aim of the SCLC-Chicago campaign.

Letter from Victor Seidel to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Victor M. Seidel requests a copy of Dr. King's lecture that was delivered at the University of Texas entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Mathias of Maryland thanks Dr. King for his recent letter urging him to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. Although Mathias' vote against the seating was defeated, he states that the mere challenge to it "has drawn once again the attention of the American public to this unfortunate situation."

Letter from J. M. Douglas to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963
Virginia (VA)

J. M. Douglas, from the Moderators Council of the Progressive National Baptist Convention, thanks Dr. King for his consideration and prompt response to an earlier invitation. Douglas extends another invitation for Dr. King "to come to us, at your first opening available."

Letter from Mary Mikutel to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Mary Mikutel offers her condolences to Mrs. King in the wake of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Saturday Review

Monday, May 11, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, wrote Dr. King to gain insight on his preference for a sentence revision to appear in his book "Why We Cant Wait."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."