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"Tennessee (TN)"

Draft Proposal for Southern Regional Community Services Council

Tuesday, March 29, 1966
Washington, D.C.

As a draft proposal for the non-profit Southern Regional Community Services Council, this document outlines the purpose and intended methodologies of the organization. The Council's mission is to train local leaders to help the unemployed and poor find jobs. Local leaders would include representation from churches, colleges, farm groups, professionals, and small businesses. Other goals are to increase living standards and cycle income back into businesses that focus on community savings and development.

Immortality

Dr. King finds the best description of the unknowable nature of immortality in the New Testament of the Bible. It is a fragment of 1 Corinthians 2:9 regarding heaven.

Aristotle

Dr. King cites Aristotle's ideas regarding matter and form.

Ralph David Abernathy: A Man of the People

Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Memphis, TN, Albany, GA, Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, St. Augustine, FL

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference published this booklet profiling Ralph David Abernathy. The articles describe his background, how he got involved in the Civil Rights Movement and the future of the SCLC under his leadership.

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967
New York, NY

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Letter from Erma Burton to the Steering Committee of SCLC

Monday, October 3, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Erma Burton stresses the importance of preserving important SCLC documents for the purpose of not only securing information for future research, but so that there will be no misinformation about their own history. She gives guidelines for how the documents should be protected and stored.

God's Relation to the World

Dr. King outlines the sermon "God's Relation to the World." Dr. King breaks down the sermon into three themes: God's creation of the world, His conservation of the world, and His transformation of the world.

Letter from Joan Daves to Jose Moya about Spanish edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, August 7, 1964
SPAIN, PORTUGAL

Here Joan Daves specifies the particulars of negotiations in advances and royalties on the sale of the Spanish edition of "Why We Can't Wait".

Fundamentalism

Dr. King cross-references fundamentalism with authoritarianism.

References (Religion and Philosophy)

Dr. King cites three articles about Borden Parker Bowne. The first, “Personalism and the Influence of Bowne,” was written by Edgar S. Brightman and appeared in the journal The Personalist.

Nature

Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Judaism

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to Pope Pius XII.

Letter from Gladys Bilcher to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967
California (CA)

Gladys Bilcher writes Dr. King expressing her enjoyment of one of Dr. King's speeches. This particular speech denouncing the war in Vietnam was given exactly one year before Dr. King's assassination on April 4, 1968.

Letter from Henry Moon to Rev. Abernathy concerning "In Memoriam" Reproductions

Thursday, April 18, 1968
New York, NY

This letter from Henry Lee Moon to Rev. Abernathy, accompanies enclosures of reproductions of documents associated with the "In Memoriam" sections of various newspapers in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Letter from MLK to Jan Helge Jansen

Tuesday, April 7, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak in Oslo, Norway in the fall of 1964. He informs the requester that the "present temper of events in this section of the country" has influenced him to adopt a policy of not accepting invitations more than two months in advance. He states, however, that he will keep the invitation on file and communicate with the sender in September regarding his eligibility to accept the invitation.

Invitation to the 20th Anniversary World Conference Against Atom and Hydrogen Bombs

Saturday, June 26, 1965
JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

Ichiro Mortaki, of the Japan Congress Against Atom & Hyrdrogen Bombs, invites Dr. King to their conference taking place 20 years after two atomic bombs were dropping on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II. This leading Japanese disarmament organization was founded the same year they extended this invitation to Dr. King.

Freud

Dr. King draws an analogy between Columbus and Dr. Sigmund Freud in that each discovered a "continent."

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from Oxford JACARI to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964
London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

Frank R. Parker, Vice-Chairman of the Oxford Joint Action Committee Against Racial Intolerance (JACARI) extends yet another speaking invitation to Dr. King, emphasizing his eagerness to hear the message of non-violent resistance.

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

SCLC-CCCO Chicago Freedom Festival

Chicago, IL

The Chicago Freedom Festival was designed to raise funds to end slums and segregation in Chicago. The festival will feature an address by Dr. King and an all-star show.

Letter from MLK to E. H. Lehman

Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King expresses concern regarding the illegal seating of elected representatives from Mississippi.

Letter from Taconic Foundation to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963
New York, NY

Stephen Currier, President of the Taconic Foundation, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting about the development of a new program. Currier lists other individuals who have been invited to serve as consultants and who will provide "an evaluation of Negro gains up to the present."

Letter from Prue Robertson to Ethel Minor

Friday, June 9, 1967
BELGIUM

Prue Robertson, secretary to Mrs. King, writes Ethel Minor concerning students in Belgium that would like to correspond with S.N.C.C.

Telegram to MLK Regarding Honor Group MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

In this telegram, sponsor Virginia Price Principal Clarence Fitch write to Dr. King to see if they can name Honor Group Martin Luther King a chapter of the National Junior Honor Society, at Roosevelt Junior High in Cleveland.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963
CANADA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Maynard Gertler writes Dr. King to request a transcript of his speech given during the March on Washington. Gertler also discusses a book by Henry Thoreau that is to be published in the near future.

Letter from Marion Dockhorn to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, April 16, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Geneva, Switzerland, SWITZERLAND

Marion Dockhorn invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 5th Annual Bucks County World Peace Fair. Dockhorn believes that Dr. King's attendance will boost support for the civil rights movement by providing a place to "spread [the] message."

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.