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Letter from Robert M. Gomsrud to MLK Regarding the Nobel Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964

In this letter, Robert M. Gomsrud, President of the Minneapolis Central Labor Union Council, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Mr. Matthias Mirschel to MLK

Saturday, June 10, 1967

In this letter Mr. Matthias Mirschel of Kirchliche Hochschule Berlin expresses commitment to Dr. King's stance against American intervention in Vietnam as well as integration for colored citizens. "We ask you not to cease with your endeavors...many people in the USA and all over the world hear your voice and support your campaign," writes Mr. Mirschel.

Individualization and Participation

Dr. King records notes on the individualization and participation of man.

Letter from MLK to Randolph Compton - February 22, 1968

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Dr. King thanks Randolph Compton for his one thousand dollar donation to the SCLC. He also acknowledges that this contribution assists in the work of voter registration and securing decent jobs and decent housing for the poor.

Letter to MLK Regarding Opposing Views

Friday, August 18, 1967

The author of this letter expresses opposition towards Dr. King's civil disobedience methodologies, believing that civil disobedience is "contrary to God."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Yves Montand

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude for the "Palais des Sports" event in Paris, France which brought support financially for the movement. Dr. King stress the duality between France and America in the "total struggle."

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

Telegram from C. Dolores Tucker to MLK and Others

Friday, November 3, 1967

C. Dolores Tucker offers some words of encouragement to Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker during their incarceration in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.

The American Jewish Committee

Friday, March 1, 1968

The American Jewish Committee reports on two projects recommended by the Kerner Commission to address "the imbalance between white and Negro in America."

"A Knock At Midnight"

Sunday, August 9, 1964

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

Funny Story for MLK

Thursday, July 12, 1962

The writer (signature illegible) gives his moral support for Dr. King during his incarceration in Albany, Georgia. He relates an anecdote of his own experiences that ends with a heartfelt, and humorous, punchline.

The Kinship Between the Labor Unions and Negroes

Dr. King presents a speech at the United Auto Workers Convention in May 1961, which acknowledges the new challenges faced by factory workers because of technological advances that threaten to leave them jobless. He draws a parallel between the plight of auto workers and the Negro experiences of disenfranchisement in the US to highlight the potential for alliance between the two groups.

Harry Belafonte - American Committee on Africa

Harry Belafonte sends a request for support in South Africa bringing awareness to apartheid and the injustices it entails. Belafonte implores the reader to send immediate help to the country in financial contributions, as an effort to fight racism and government corruption.

Letter from Elaine Attias to MLK

Monday, November 13, 1967

Elaine Attias of the Jewish Federation Council follows up on a previous request for Dr. King to appear on the television series "Commitment Profiles." She mentions other prominent people who have participated, including former Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, the Executive Secretary of Hadley Executive Committee of the Kennett Consolidated School, contacts Ms. McDonald in an attempt to reschedule an event cancelled by Dr. King.

Letter from Alan and June Fite to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

In this letter dated April 19, 1967, Alan and June Fite commend Dr. King for his speech given at a peace demonstration on April 15 and request a copy of the speech.

Telegram from C.K. Steele to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960

Rev. Steele expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's career and assures Dr. King that he is not walking alone.

Letter From MLK to Reverend Sanders

In this letter, Dr. King expresses gratitude for the efforts Rev. Sanders has taken toward battling poverty.

A Letter to MLK to President Lyndon B. Johsnon

Friday, April 13, 1962

In a letter to MLK, President Lyndon B. Johnson addresses the issue of Federal employment in Atlanta. Johnson informs King of the previous meeting held with the Civil Service Commission and the steps being taken to move forward.

Letter from Sampson & Sampson to Ms. Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Ms. Dora McDonald received this telegram pertaining to Mrs. Coretta Scott King. The sender requests that Mrs. King speak at a political action event in South Carolina. The author of this telegram was running for state senate.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Saturday, April 9, 1966

Dr. King expresses his most sincere gratitude for Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock's support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from F. D. Jones to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964

Reverend F. D. Jones congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Tillich's Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "The Protestant Era."

Letter From T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Saturday, December 24, 1966

T. K. Mahadevan, a representative of the Gandhi Peace Foundation, writes Dr. King regarding an upcoming visit to the United States. Some primary interests during his visit includes meeting key Negro leaders, spending time with an average Negro family, and perhaps a few speaking engagements.

Letter from Yolinda Pelmore to MLK

Friday, December 8, 1967

Yolinda Pelmore, a young student, asks Dr. King how he became famous. The reading theme for her class prompted her to write.

Letter from Edinbugh University to MLK

Sunday, July 31, 1966

Malcom L. Rigkind, the President of Debates at Edinburgh University, renews an invitation for Dr. King to speak in Scotland.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry R. Luce

Friday, February 15, 1963

Dora McDonald writes to Henry Luce, of Time & Life, in response to his prior correspondence to Dr. King.