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Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Letter from Edgar E. Evans to MLK

Edgar E. Evans communicates with Dr. King to discuss stocks regarding the Farm and City Enterprises, Inc. Mr. Evans further informs Dr. King of the Negro Citizen's lack of confidence within the corporation. He continues to expound on the financial inconsistencies within the organization.

Commentary on MLK Article

This article describes Dr. King's approval of a recent civil rights ordinance passing in Gary, Indiana. The purpose of the ordinance is to prohibit discrimination in the sale, rental, leasing or financing of real estate. Dr. King thanks the community and members of the City Council for making the ordinance possible.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

Editorial- "Lawlessness Means Bloodshed, End of Dreams"

In this article, light heavy-weight boxing champion Archie Moore discourages black Americans from resorting to "lawlessness" in their attempts to advance the cause of civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Peter Mansfield

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Dr. King accepts the invitation extended by Peter Mansfield, Acting President of the National Union of South African Students, to give the opening address for the organization's 41st Annual Congress at the University of Natal in South Africa.

President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.

Atheism

Dr. King writes on the topic atheism.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, April 16, 1967

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

Friday, April 5, 1968

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Blank Jury Questionnaire to MLK

This Jury Questionaire was sent to Dr. King by The Fulton County Court House.

Letter from Robert G. Lippmann to MLK

Saturday, November 16, 1963

Robert G. Lippmann requests a copy of the sermon Dr. King delivered at the Sixth Avenue Baptist Church for the funeral services of Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Diane Wesley.

Letter from June A. Williams

June A. Williams encloses a copy of the November - December, 1966 American Veterans Committee Bulletin which carries a summary report of the recent AVC National Conference of the Draft.

Proposal for Preventing Denial of the Right to Vote

Thursday, October 29, 1964

William L. Higgs proposes that the Democratic Caucus in the US Senate adopt a resolution that no Democratic Senator shall become chairman of a Senate Standing Committee if his seat was won in an election where there was substantial denial of the right to vote based on race. In Mississippi only 6% of eligible Negroes are registered to vote, yet US Senator James Eastland chairs the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee that considers legislation regarding the right to vote and also the appointment of judges charged with enforcing those laws.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Letter from Mary B. Courtney to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965

Mary B. Courtney requests Dr. King's help to sell her property. She explains to him that the house has been on the market for three years in St. Petersburg, Florida, and while "several colored people" have contacted the real estate agency with interest, they are dissuaded by the lack of African Americans in the neighborhood. The author suggests that Dr. King contact some of his associates in St. Petersburg to assist in the matter.

Letter from Representative Ken W. Dyal to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to inform him that he has signed the discharge petition for the Home Rule Bill.

Refinement By Fire

This brochure provides an overview of the SCLC Citizenship Education Program held at the Dorchester Community Center in Georgia.

Religion and Race Memo

Friday, July 15, 1966

The Religion and Race organization distributes a memo to discuss the various topics involving the meaning of "black power", the United Presbyterians joint actions within the Mississippi March, the testimony's end in Wilcox County, and Project Equality.

The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought

These handwritten notes appear to be a draft of the essay "The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought." Dr. King wrote this for James Bennett Pritchard's class on the Old Testament at Crozer Theological Seminary. Circa September 14, 1948 - November 24, 1948. The actual essay is in the King Archive at Boston University's Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center.

Letter from H. Melvin Lieberstein to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

H. Melvin Lieberstein thanks Dr. King for the personal letter Lieberstein received. Lieberstein adds quiet support to Dr. King, stating that in his chosen career field he regrets an inability to provide more active support.

Telegram from the James A. Bailey Family to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

The James A. Bailey family offers its prayers for Dr. King's recovery.

Letter from MLK to Cal David Gleaton

Thursday, December 2, 1965

Dr. King thanks Rev. Cal Gleaton for his letter in support of the work of the SCLC. Dr. King tells Gleaton that the letter was uplifting and that his contribution to the morale and the spirit of the freedom movement is mostly appreciated by the staff of the SCLC.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

Telegram from Stanley Levison to Coretta Scott King

Friday, January 17, 1969

Stanley Levison warns Mrs. King about interceding between governments.

Dialogue: A Search for Reconciliation

Through the power of dialogue, the SCLC seeks to bring diverse cultures together for the purpose of removing barriers and achieving meaningful communication. This brochure outlines six programs of action designed to achieve this goal including group conversation, community dialogue, dialogue of faith, campus dialogue, dialogue round tables, and dialogue with self.

MLK Notes

Dr. King expresses concern about common attitudes towards the Church. In his words, "So often people will do a good thing, and then spoil it by some ugly twist of the spirit."

Letter from MLK to Miss R. Berkenvelder

Monday, November 22, 1965

Dr. King writes to Miss Berkenvelder, agreeing that silent and non-active individuals maintained the severity of injustices. He further elaborates on his prayer that warriors will form who are committed to nonviolence and world peace.

Advertisement for Mrs. King's Upcoming Appearance

This flyer serves as an advertisement for Mrs. Coretta Scott King's upcoming public appearance at the First African Baptist Church. Mrs. King wishes to honor every Freedom Fighter who was imprisoned during a civil rights demonstration.

Letter from Irving Frank to MLK

Irving Frank urges Dr. King to continue speaking out against the Vietnam War. Frank also encloses a check in support of Dr. King.