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"Tennessee (TN)"

Letter from Robert A. Goldwin to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1963

Robert A. Goldwin informs Dr. King that he is enclosing four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation." Goldwin hopes Dr. King will enjoy reading the essays.

Letter from MLK to Mr. A. Fouche

Wednesday, February 6, 1963

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Fouche's hospitality during his visit to the Bay Area.

Telegram from C.K. Steele to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960

Rev. Steele expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's career and assures Dr. King that he is not walking alone.

Letter from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to MLK

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

This is a handwritten note from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to Dr. King questioning his position as a "Man of God" and a "Man of Peace". She also accuses Dr. King of having hate and being a troublemaker.

Letter from Arthur C. Holden to MLK Requesting Publication Review

Monday, December 11, 1967

Arthur C. Holden sends his paper entitled "The Negro, The Small Group, And Our Slum Problem" to Dr. King for review.

Letter from Gunnar Fagerberg to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964

Dr. King is the recipient of this invitation to speak made by the students of the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden.

By-Laws of the SCLC

This document outlines the by-laws of the SCLC, which includes the organization's purpose, duties and responsibilities of members, and procedures governing officers and committees. The purpose of the SCLC is to "organize and maintain Christian guidance" to aid in improving cultural conditions.

Anonymous Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter sends Dr. King a strong message to leave Chicago. According to the sender, Dr. King does nothing but "cause trouble from one place to another."

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Monday, April 3, 1967

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Pride of Achievement

Dr. King quotes II Chronicles 26:15 regarding King Uzziah and cites Ralph Sockman’s “The Higher Happiness.”

Letter from Harry Denman to Billy Graham and MLK

Friday, June 18, 1965

Harry Denman, an evangelist at the Methodist Church in Nashville, Tennessee, writes to Dr. King and Dr. Billy Graham in the hope that they will appear together for eight consecutive nights on a television program to be broadcast nationally and themed "God's Society."

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 22, 1963

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

Letter from Cees van Gils to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

Dr. King is congratulated for his receipt of an honorary degree from a university in Amsterdam. Cees van Gils requests Dr. King deliver a speech to the Tilburg University community during his tenure in Europe.

Letter from MLK Regarding SCLC

Friday, October 1, 1965

In this letter, King discusses the importance of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. SCLC will continue their major work in the South, but will also respond to the calls of the North. He goes on to state that financial and moral support is always appreciated, and by a small contribution one could be part of "America's most imperative moral and social mission."

Letter from MLK to S. P. Belcher

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King express gratitude for the receipt of financial support during an event at the Palasis des Sports. In addition, Dr. King highlights the importance of the demonstration for international concerns of the French and American communities in Paris.

Letter from Dr. Earl C. Jackson, Sr. to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Earl Jackson writes Dr. King requesting feedback regarding his upcoming speaking engagement as one of three keynote speakers during a large conference in Delaware.

What Is Salvation

Dr. King writes notes regarding several components of salvation.

Dr. King Acceptance as an Honorary Member of Wellesley College

Dr. King often had delayed responses due to his strenuous schedule, traveling obligations, and completion of the necessary duties as the President of the SCLC. Dr. King's letter to Miss Knight provides an example of the unintentional unpunctuality as he accepts an award as an honorary member of Wellesley College class of 1966.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Walters to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Walters of Stone Mountain, Georgia congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Andrew Hobart to MLK

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

In this letter, dated 11/29/66, Mr. Andrew Hobart, President of Ministers Life and Casualty Union informs Dr. King that his application for reinstatement has been accepted, and cautions a lapsed contract may result in a loss or reduction of benefits.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Monday, April 12, 1965

In this letter to Miss McDonald, Ms. Daves discusses a request for Dr. King to write a short introduction to William Bradford Huie's work "Three Lives for Mississippi". Ms. Daves stresses the importance of this opportunity as it addresses a topic "very much on Dr. King's mind," namely the starting of a "dialogue...between the two opposing forces."

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Letter from Anne Braden to A.D. King

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Joe Mulloy will be highlighted in a set of galley proofs for a story in the February issue of The Southern Patriot. Anne Braden informs Reverend A.D. King of the induction refusal by Mr. Mulloy and how it correlates to many SCLC staff members. Mrs. Braden is sending the letter to Dr. King as well and hopes that Rev. A.D. King will participate in this action.

MLK's Statement on Endorsing a 1960 Presidential Candidate

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

Dr. King states that the SCLC is a non-partisan organization and that he cannot endorse a political party or candidate. He then goes on to express gratitude for Senator Kennedy and Mayor Hartsfield for their continuous support and leadership.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

William Kivi references a statement made by Dr. King at the SCLC convention pertaining to everyone having a "guaranteed income." Kivi's belief is that Republican officials in the state of California continue to chisel away at federal programs designed to give the poor access to health care and other government aid. His recommendation to Dr. King as a solution would be a "restructured national civil service."

Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson reaches out to Dr. King on behalf of a student organization at the University of Cape Town to obtain a response to their invitation asking Dr. King to deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture.

Letter from Frederick G. Dutton to MLK Regarding the Oral History Project

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Frederick G. Dutton, by request of Robert Kennedy, contacts Dr. King to discuss the Oral History Project for the John F. Kennedy Library. Mr. Dutton informs Dr. King that Berl Bernhard will be communicating with him to arrange a proper interview time.