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Letter from MLK to Ruth Ellington

Wednesday, July 28, 1965

Dr. King writes Ruth Ellington of New York to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He describes the current efforts of the SCLC and explains the importance of supporters for the continuation of the SCLC.

Dignity Is the Best Way

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

The Atlanta Constitution writes about Dr. King serving a five day sentence for contempt of court in Birmingham.

Final Itinerary for Mrs. Coretta King and Party

This document contains the final itinerary for Mrs. King and her party's trip. The group is traveling with Henderson Travel Service to Oslo, Norway to see Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Charles H. K. to MLK

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Charles H. K., from the University of Montreal, encloses a financial contribution and informs Dr. King that he is moving to Canada and would like information on how to continue his contributions.

The Modern Negro Activist

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Letter from MLK to Rev. S. J. Wickliffe

Saturday, March 31, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. S.J. Wickliffe for his financial contribution. Dr. King also stresses that, despite his schedule, he will have his secretary type out Rev. Wickliffe's manuscript and then review it to figure out why it has not been published.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Letter from Lucy Melhuish to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Lucy A. Melhuish requests Dr. King's assistance in acquiring copies of speeches from the Poor People's March on Washington. Ms. Melhuish is a graduate student working on her doctorate degree at California State College.

Letter from Philip Foubert to Joan Daves

Saturday, November 28, 1964

This letter dated November 28, 1964, was sent to Joan Daves from Philip Foubert. Foubert, editor of ECHO at Seattle Prep, writes to Joan Daves requesting that Dr. King write a "short letter, suitable for publication in our yearbook and addressed to the students of Seattle Prep."

Notecard Containing the Definition of Thinking

This notecard quotes Dr. Brightman's definition of thinking, taken from "An Intro to Philosophy".

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

Letter from Nancy Fuentes to Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Nancy Fuentes writes Mrs. King to express her condolences for Dr. King's death and extend her love to Mrs. King and her children.

Telegram from Bea and Andy Stanley to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960

Bea and Andy Stanley send Dr. King a telegram while he is in the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta. The Stanley's express, "we are inexpressibly proud that the determination to end segregation is upheld with such dignity and self sacrifice."

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to the President of the SCLC, addresses Attorney General Eugene Cook regarding a conversation that was agreed to be private. Despite this agreement, the conversation was publicized to United Press International. Mr. Walker expresses his frustration and announces his next steps to the Attorney General.

Ross Hamilton Sends MLK Support

Thursday, November 28, 1963

Ross Hamilton, 11-years-old, writes Dr. King with support and encloses money from one of his Christmas gifts.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about Howard Address

Monday, June 7, 1965

Dr. King writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson expressing appreciation and admiration for his speech at the Howard University Commencement.

Letter from Carolyn B. Russell to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Carolyn B. Russell is a high school student in support of Dr. King and informs him about different aspects of her life. As a result of living in her single mother's household, Carolyn desires employment and to continue her education.

Letter to Dr. King from Ralph M. Otwell Requesting an Address to the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Tuesday, March 24, 1964

Mr. Otwell, representing the Chicago Sun-Times, has requested that Dr. King writes an address to be published in the Sunday edition, regarding the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Additionally, Mr. Otwell assures Dr. King that this will be an opportunity to promote his book, "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Thursday, October 12, 1967

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

Letter from the Speakers Bureau to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

The Speakers Bureau writes Dr. King as they are preparing to publish a new edition of the Speakers Booklet for 1968-69. They request Dr. King's biography, topics of discussion, a recent photo, and ask his general availability.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Paix, Bonheur, Sante et Amour pour l'an 1960

Friday, January 1, 1960

Dr. King received this card from the editor of the French tabloid Paris-Jour (Paris Day). The headline reads, "Peace, Happiness, Health and Love for the Year 1960."

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah regarding God's grace and mercy.

Letter from Betty Doocy to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Betty Doocy of Chicago, Illinois mildly criticizes Dr. King for leading marches in an effort to integrate neighborhoods in Chicago. She tells Dr. King of her experiences living in poverty as a non-Negro, and how her family has been able to survive and endure hardships. Doocy encourages Dr. King to instruct Negroes to properly take care of their living quarters and to be respectable in their job professions.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

Swedish Martin Luther King Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966

The Martin Luther King Fund was an internationally housed organization in which numerous countries participated in helping to support and spread Dr. King's messages. This document represents the facts and activity program of the Swedish organization headquartered in Stockholm. Included are lists of the Executive Committee, Honorary Board members, and activities designed to create a better understanding of Dr. King's work.

Letter from Birmingham Jail

Wednesday, June 12, 1963

In this copy printed in "The Christian Century," Dr. King writes his letter in response to several Alabama Clergymen who accuse him of being unwise and untimely. His accusers call him an extremist and an "outside agitator" who should not be in Alabama. Dr. King references several sources in his counter to their arguments.

Letter from MLK to Louis Simon

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dr. King thanks Louis Simon of the Amalgamated Laundry Workers Joint Board for his thoughts about Dr. King's speech in Miami and the financial contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains that the holiday season is one of the hardest times of the year for the SCLC.

Letter from MLK Regarding the Movie "Two Eyes, Twelve Hands"

In this letter, Dr. King writes to an unknown recipient regarding royalty matters of a movie entitled "Two Eyes, Twelve Hands". Dr. King thanks the recipient for consideration, and urges that further communication should be directed to Reverend Andrew Young.