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Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Wednesday, November 14, 1956

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding the Montgomery Bus Boycotts. The Supreme Court rendered a decision making separate but equal unconstitutional. Dr. King states that the next course of action that should be taken is the implementation of this noble decision and the end of the long night of enforced segregation.

Hegel

Dr. King outlines principles of Hegel's philosophy regarding rationality and reality.

United Nations Association-Hawaii Chapter

Monday, April 8, 1968

The card, shown here, is an expression of condolence and gratitude from the Hawaii chapter of the United Nations Association, in the form of a "lei of love".

Letter from Ralph Saylor to MLK

Mr. Saylor assures Dr. King that he still has the support of the white community regardless of his stance on the Vietnam War.

Barth on Dogmatics

Dr. King examines Karl Barth's view of dogmatics as an act of faith.

Letter from W. F. Washington to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Rev. Washington assures Dr. King that he has his support as a fellow minister for his stand on the Vietnam War.

Letter from to Mrs. B. B. Tolman

Wednesday, November 15, 1967

Dr. King writes to Mrs. E. B. Tolman, thanking her for her support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Racism in the United States

Dr. King discusses the issues of racism, Jim Crow and nonviolence in this edition of Current. He further explains that, without the tactic of nonviolence, Negroes can become hostile and bitter. Throughout this issue several other writers are featured including Leslie W. Dunbar, Langston Hughes and Fay Bennett.

Letter from Kathy Sasso to MLK

Kathy Sasso, a student at Public School 30 in Staten Island, New York, notifies Dr. King that her class read his "I Have a Dream" speech and named him "Person of the Week." Sasso also requests a copy of one of Dr. King's speeches.

King Finds New Target

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

This article from The Topeka Daily Capital discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King verbalizes his stance after seeing anti-poverty funds being used for war. The article also mentions civil rights leaders who are against joining both causes for civil rights and world peace.

Proposal for a Conference on Democratic Planning in America

This proposal highlights a conference that is focused on creating an understanding of democratic development, economic planning, civil rights and peace movements.

Invitation from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

This is a program for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's Forty-First Boule in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The event features Dr. King as a guest speaker.

Letter from Edwin Berry to MLK

Monday, November 21, 1966

Edwin C. Berry thanks Dr. King for his recent gift and membership to the Chicago Urban League. Berry goes on to give an update of the group's activities.

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King delivers a sermon that urges his listeners to search for their purpose in life. He requests that his younger listeners attend school and strive for higher education. He stresses to not let the color of their skin keep them from achieving their dreams.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Earl C. Scott

Thursday, September 13, 1962

Dr. King writes Reverend Earl C. Scott expressing appreciation for his words of encouragement and providing Reverend Scott with information regarding his current work towards social justice.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Constance Baker Motley

Friday, June 22, 1962

Mr. Walker informs Mrs. Motley, Associate Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, that either he or Dr. King will be in attendance at the upcoming Lawyers Conference.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, November 28, 1963

SCLC Chairman Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders in honoring President John F. Kennedy, as the they seek to promote the idea of civil rights.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Letter From Dr. Fred Lange - Nielsen to MLK

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Dr. Fred Lange - Nielson writes Dr. King informing him of a recent appeal that was sent to several Norwegian Bishops. He also encloses a copy of an official translated 'Manifesto'.

Soren Kierkegaard

Dr. King writes about Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard's first stage at which men live, aesthetics.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

Friday, January 26, 1968

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

Press Release for Catholic Interracial Council Award

Tuesday, August 11, 1964

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago announces that Dr. King will be awarded the John F. Kennedy Annual Award at their 1964 benefit dinner as a tribute to his leadership. According to polls published in Newsweek magazine, Dr. King's leadership was prized "more than any other single Negro."

Self

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.”

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

Letter from MLK to The Farmington Ministerial Association

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter, dated January 30, 1967, was sent from Dr. King to the Farming Ministerial Association. In this letter, he thanks them for their contribution and apologizes for responding late. Their letter was accidentally placed in a folder entitled "Letters to be filed". He further goes on to state how he wishes they, along with other loyal contributors could know more directly how important their support is to the SCLC and all that it stands for.

Letter from MLK to Ohio Senator Frank J. Lausche

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator Frank J. Lausche (D-OH) for his support in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Senator Lausche also served as Governor of Ohio.

The Jackie Robinson Saga

This brief biographical sketch highlights Jackie Robinson's life and his accomplishments as a baseball player, Army Lieutenant and business executive.

First Congregational Church Program

Dr. King is listed to speak at an evening church service entitled, "The Immorality of Racial Segregation."