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New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Letter from Ethel Sebastian to MLK

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Mrs. Ethel Sebastian requests that Dr. King assists in the search of her father, whom she has never met. Mrs. Sebastian provides facts and details to better aid Dr. King's pursuit of locating her father. She also mentions her cousin, a Reverend, who is a member of Friendship Baptist Church. Mrs. Sebastian is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and sends her blessings in hope that he can locate her family relatives.

Transformed Nonconformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King discusses the importance of not conforming in a sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the hardships and the benefits that come with being a transformed non-conformist.

The Martin Luther King Column (2)

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband, Lucius, on behalf of the civil rights movement.

MLK Statement Regarding the Non-Partisan Position of the SCLC

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

While keeping the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's position as a non-partisan organization, Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Senator Kennedy's concern for his arrest.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Royalty Statement for Casterman Published Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement references royalties earned for a French-language edition of "Strength to Love".

MLK honored; He sees Kinship in Civil Rights and Family Planning

Dr. King receives the first Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the National Conference. Dr. King states, "Negroes have a special and urgent concern with family planning as a profoundly important ingredient in their struggle for security and a decent life."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr.

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King extended his appreciation to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr. for the letter and copy of Mr. Wood's speech given on the Demonstration Cities Program.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

An anonymous supporter sends an encouraging letter to Dr. King.

Letter from Robert Green to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

SCLC Education Director Robert Green writes Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach requesting a federal intervention on discrimination practices in Mississippi. Green complains that members of SCLC, SNCC, CORE and other organizations were denied access to restrooms during the 1966 James Meredith March Against Fear.

Letter from MLK to Paralee Fields

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King writes Paralee Fields to decline an invitation to speak at the commencement for Phenix High School. Dr. King explains that he is very busy with the Civil Rights Movement and has limited time for speaking engagements.

Letter from Richard Boone to Barbara Hicks

Friday, July 2, 1965

Rev. Boone encloses some adverse literature to be distributed to Dr. King and others.

Letter from Mr. Herbert. H. Fisher to MLK

Saturday, July 17, 1965

Mr. Fisher, President of the Chatham Avalon Park Community Council, provides an organized detailed account of community concerns. More specifically, he addresses various social and political issues regarding schools, housing, insufficient leadership, and government services.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Blandena Lee Kossodo

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Blandena Lee Kossodo expressing that Dr. King is honored to have been offered to write the introduction to her book. However, Dr. King has to decline because he is writing his own book and for other publications.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

Letter from Robert Nelson to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965

Robert R. Nelson notifies Dr. King of the recent invitation that was first extended by Mr. Wendell English on behalf of the Impact Committee at Marshall University. Mr. Nelson requests Dr. King to participate as a key note speaker at one of the events. Impact is a morality driven organization focused on the proper guidance and purpose of life.

Telegram from ABC Network to Ralph David Abernathy

Monday, April 22, 1968

A correspondent from the American Broadcasting Company Network in Washington D.C. contacts Reverend Ralph Abernathy attempting to continue an interview previously scheduled with Dr. King before his death.

A Tribute to the MLK

Monday, November 30, 1964

Several organizations in Stamford, Connecticut sponsor a tribute in honor of Dr. King. This document outlines the program participants, and lists Dr. King as providing the keynote address.

Letter from Rosslyn J. Shaw to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Rosslyn J. Shaw invites Dr. King to speak to the New Zealand Universities Students' Association's annual Congress.

MLK Note Card - "Paint"

In this note card, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints on "...shin[ing] only for the life of imitative mediocrity."

Letter from Rev. Camilo A. Boasso to MLK

Wednesday, December 30, 1964

In this document, a Catholic priest from Argentina writes to Dr. King and congratulates him for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The priest also inquires about obtaining permission to translate into Spanish Dr. King's recent book "Why We Cant Wait." Requests like this increased significantly as Dr. King's prominence grew.

Why Should SCLC be Departmentalized?

This document defines and discusses the departmentalization of the SCLC. It also outlines the job duties of the following positions: Executive Director, Program Director, Director of Affiliates, Field Secretary, Field Worker, and Subsistence Worker.

Letter to Baron Allard from Mrs. King

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Mrs. King writes to Baron Allard to thank him for the time she spent in Belgium. She thanks him for the gifts he sent for her loved ones and extends an invitation to visit when he travels to Atlanta.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Letter from MLK to Tore Lundby

Monday, May 24, 1965

Dr. King informs Mr. Lundby, Editor, he is unable to contribute an article to BLAESUVOLDEINS EFTERRETNINGSTIDENDE.

Note from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, September 4, 1963

A representative of Joan Daves is enclosing a check for $120 for the Spanish edition of the book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Florence of Scepter Records, Inc. to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

In this letter, Florence thanks Dr. King for his address at the NATRA Convention. She also encloses a contribution to continue the work of the movement.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.