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Telegram from MLK to Honorable Daniel Evans

Dr. King writes to the Honorable Daniel Evans requesting that he intercede in the controversy resulting from Washington State's conservation law and a 111-year old treaty.

Gregory the Great (540-604)

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding Gregory the Great otherwise known as Pope Gregory I.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Man

Dr. King notes poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's ideology of man and his capabilities.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Commencement Ceremony at Boston University

This photograph shows a commencement ceremony at Boston University in June of 1959.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Art - Aesthetic

Dr. King notes several passages from Paul Tillich's "The Religious Situation." The quotes relay the importance of art and its aesthetic value on the function of spiritual situations.

Letter from Rodney H. Clurman to Jayaprakash Narayan

Monday, May 29, 1967

Rodney H. Clurman writes Jayaprakash Narayan about the current state of the Middle East. This letter was written just days before the Six-Day war between Egypt and Israel. It is suggested that the governments of each nation, including the U.S., be prepared for the possibility of increased violence.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller to Wyatt Walker

Monday, June 22, 1964

This telegram is part of a correspondence chain with famous New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller. Rockefeller informs Wyatt Tee Walker that a schedule conflict prohibits his attendance at the Dedication of New Churches in Albany.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Monday, April 12, 1965

In this letter to Miss McDonald, Ms. Daves discusses a request for Dr. King to write a short introduction to William Bradford Huie's work "Three Lives for Mississippi". Ms. Daves stresses the importance of this opportunity as it addresses a topic "very much on Dr. King's mind," namely the starting of a "dialogue...between the two opposing forces."

Worship (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "Methods of Private Religious Living."

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Anthropology

Dr. King outlines and references ideas on anthropology.

The Church Says No on Proposition 14

Thie Council of Churches in Northern and Southern California argues against the goals of Proposition 14. This 1964 ballot proposition sought to amend the California consitution by nullifying the Rumford Fair Housing Act. Prop 14 would go on to pass, but two years later the California Supreme Court deemed it unconstitutional.

Final Itinerary for Mrs. Coretta King and Party

This document contains the final itinerary for Mrs. King and her party's trip. The group is traveling with Henderson Travel Service to Oslo, Norway to see Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Walter Martin to SCLC Officials

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Walter Martin of the American Friends Service Committee, writes to numerous SCLC officials concerning Quaker work in Southern Africa.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Sunday, June 25, 1967

In this letter, Joseph Clark shows appreciation for the work Dr. King has done.

OEO Extends Contract with National Council of Negro Women

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This press release from the Office of Economic Opportunity highlights a technical assistance program designed to stimulate home ownership among poor Negro women in the deep South.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, July 25, 1966

This document outlines the financial statements of the Atlanta home office of the SCLC. The figures are from July 25, 1966 through July 28, 1966.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publication Deadlines

Monday, January 30, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves provides feedback on Dr.King's chapter on "Black Power,"and she informs Dr. King that she is waiting for chapters on "White Backlash" and "What It Means to be a Negro in America," for his book "Where do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Religion

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking’s “The Meaning of God in Human Experience.”

SCLC Retreat November 1967

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

Miracle

Dr. King quotes statements from Harry E. Fosdick's "Modern Use of the Bible" regarding the definition of a miracle.

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

Letter from Marsha and Roger Zimmerman to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman send a note of support to Dr. King's for his statements regarding the Vietnam conflict.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Mr. Jones, on behalf of the Council for Co-operative Action, invites Dr. King to speak at their function in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

An Open Letter to Free Americans

In response to Dr. King's assassination, the author urges "Free Americans" to join the fight against racism.

Letter from M. Rogers to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

M. Rogers objects to Dr. King's teachings and infers he should study the New Testament of the Bible. Mr. Rogers perceives that what Dr. King preaches causes "more resentment between the different races." He further elaborates on how he envisions the affects of "non-violence" and "civil disobedience."