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"Tokyo, Japan"

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Tuesday, September 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Proposal for Black Independence

Al Shabazz writes up a program for Black independence. The proposal suggests two program options for leaders to choose from. Once the program has been decided the leader would go out and gather the opinion of the masses. Next, the program would implement unconventional education along with employment and survival skills. The program also promotes an independent nation with alliances from those of all races. The program promotes black revolution and the demise of the elite White Supremacist.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Wachtel informs Dr. King that a large donation made by Mrs. Ann Farnsworth is now available. Wachtel then asks Dr. King who is to send the acknowledgment.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. G. Baker

Friday, July 30, 1965
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Baker, President of the Bethune Art and Study Club, for her monetary contribution to the SCLC. King explains that each contribution is necessary for the SCLC to fulfill all its tasks.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Tennessee (TN)

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

New York Mayor Wagner Remarks at Reception

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

New York Mayor Robert F. Wagner honors Dr. King at a reception following a ceremony where he was presented the Medallion of Honor of the City of New York after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The Mayor especially commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership in nonviolence and the spirit of love, goodwill, and peacemaking that he brings to the struggle for racial justice.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion" on temporal things so filling people's minds that they don't have room for the eternal. He contrasts this with pantheism. The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

The Christian Church and Communist Atheism

Missouri (MO), New York (NY)

Helmut Gollwitzer, a Protestant theologian, completes this body of work entitled "The Christian Church and Communist Atheism." The author states that, "socialists may be Christians, but Christians must be socialists."

Lette from Morton Sobell to a Friend

Tuesday, August 23, 1966
New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA), New Mexico (NM)

Mrs. Sobell requests that Dr. King attend the open hearing for Morton Sobell. She also asks for financial support to aid in his defense.

Letter from MLK to Robert Wagner

Tuesday, March 3, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King sends condolences to Mayor Robert Wagner consequent to his wife's death.

MLK Flyer: "Integrated Bus Suggestions"

Wednesday, December 19, 1956
Montgomery, AL

In this document, Dr. King and the Reverend W.J. Powell list under "The Montgomery Improvement Association" guidelines to mitigate potential conflicts in the transition to integrated buses. The principle of nonviolence is present throughout the document.

MLK Press Statement After Receiving Nobel Prize

Thursday, December 17, 1964
Oslo, Norway, London, England, Stockholm, Sweden, FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

Dr. King issued this statement to the press upon return from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in Norway. In addition to declaring how he plans to distribute his prize winnings, Dr. King discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Essay Describing MLK as a Historical Leader

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King is highlighted for his admirable leadership in Montgomery, Alabama. Dr. King's deep spiritual convictions and charter traits allowed him to lead the people in Montgomery. He is described as a man of deep humility, showman and a highly intelligent leader.

Letter from Detroit Resident to MLK

Monday, November 21, 1966
Detroit, MI

The Detroit resident identifies the Negro man's concept of equality as being intertwined with the sexual exploitation of white women. The author references an article that cites the disparity in numbers of illegitimate children amongst blacks and white.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to the SCLC

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Ralph Abernathy, Vice President and Financial Secretary of the SCLC, submits the semi-annual financial report for the period of July 1, 1967 to December 31, 1967 to the SCLC Board of Directors. He also commends his financial staff members for their good work.

Letter from Jameas Lucas to MLK Regarding Legal Help

Louisiana (LA)

Mr. Lucas requests Dr. King's legal assistance regarding a manslaughter trial against a white man.

Letter from Jessie Tidwell to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

Jessie Tidwell writes Dr. King wishing him the best of luck and expressing interest in meeting him in person.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

The American Dream

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

Letter from Constance A. Price to David J. Hahn

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
Colorado (CO), Denver, CO

Constance Price informs David Hahn, Colorado State Senator, of how she has suffered for the past twelve years due to the violation of her constitutional rights as guaranteed by the Workman's Compensation Act of Colorado.

Letter from Ernestine Lee to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

A fourteen-year-old child, inspired by Dr. King's speeches, sends a small contribution and a prayer to the King family.

What Is Salvation

Dr. King writes notes regarding several components of salvation.

Letter from MLK to Sara Mitchell

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Mitchell, a representative from the Atlanta Board of Education, for her recent letter acclaiming his book "Where Do We Go From Here." Dr. King states that the lack of material on Negro History and culture in America's public schools is "appalling" and children from all races will benefit from learning about another aspect of American culture and history.

Letter from San Francisco Vietnam Committee to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

The San Francisco Vietnam Committee invites Dr. King to speak for their anti-Vietnam War rally. Dr. King would begin making statements against the Vietnam War during the fall of 1965.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

Thursday, March 1, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from A. Morsbach to MLK

Tuesday, October 18, 1966
New York, NY, ISRAEL

A. Morsbach writes Dr. King regarding his tour to the Holy Land. Having years of experience with group travel, Morsbach informs Dr. King that he plans to check the background of Concreta Tours. He further suggests that King investigate Concreta Tours prior to concluding final travel arrangements.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

The Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority extends appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to speak at their upcoming convention in Philadelphia.

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Tokyo, Japan, JAPAN

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.

Letter from Martin Sizemoreto to Gentlemen

Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Martin Sizemore explains that the Madison Senior High School's Speech Department is researching a topic for their debate team and is in request for any literature that could contribute to their research.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

Friday, January 26, 1968
VIETNAM, Cleveland, OH, BELGIUM, New York, NY

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.