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"Tokyo, Japan"

MLK Delta Flight Itinerary

This is Dr. King's flight itinerary. Included destinations are New York, Nassau, and Buenos Aires, South America.

Letter from J.W. Parnell to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Rev. J.W. Parnell writes Dr. King to request support for his "one man demonstration march." The demonstration, Parnell outlines, features a bicycle ride from Coney Island, New York to Long Beach, California, conjoined with prayer and a symbolic water ritual.

Urban Insurance Coverage

Congressman William S. Moorhead introduces legislation to the House of Representatives, seeking to improve urban insurance coverage and provide governmental riot reinsurance.

Letter from Wilfred Laurier Husband to John B. Oakes of the New York Times

Friday, April 7, 1967

Wilfred Husband writes John Oakes, Editorial Page Editor of the New York Times, regarding an article. As a consistent reader of the Magazine, Husband expresses his displeasure with an article that refers to the civil right movement's attention to the war in Vietnam as "wasteful and self-defeating." Husband explains how war and civil rights are inseparable and that stating anything in opposition hurts the cause of the movement.

Letter from Charles R. Bell Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Mr. Bell inquires about a prisoner who was beaten to death in his home state of Alabama.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

Letter from Clarence Long to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965

Congressman Long writes Dr. King delighted to inform him of his full support regarding home rule for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Edward W. Brooke to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

In this letter, Senator Edward W. Brooke offers his gratitude to Dr. King, for his support of the current civil rights bill.

Letter from James McKee to Dora McDonald Concerning MLK's Antioch Commencement Address

Friday, April 2, 1965

James McKee, Chief of the Yellow Springs Police Department, writes Dora McDonald regarding security arrangements for Dr. King's visit to Yellow Springs, Ohio for Antioch College's Commencement.

Letter from Arthur LeSueur to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

Arthur LeSueur, a War World II veteran, expresses his support of Dr. King's endeavors to gain equality in America. He hopes that Dr. King will not be discouraged by the great injustices he has faced and will continue to hold strong to his position.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.


Dr. King records his thoughts on the book of Deuteronomy to illustrate the oneness of God.

Letter from James McLaurin to MLK and Andrew Young

Tuesday, March 15, 1966

James McLaurin asks Dr. King to spend part of a day with the students and faculty at Garrett. The topic that they want Dr. King to speak about is the seminary's role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan Jackson

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan in the passing of Mrs. Portlock. The King's highlight Mrs. Portlock's positive attributes and her great inspirational influence.

MLK Draft - The Weakness of Liberal Theology

Dr. King analyzes the problems associated with liberal theology. According to his view, liberal theology, "seems to be too divorced from life."

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

Letter from Martha Williams to MLK

Wednesday, March 31, 1965

Martha Williams, who serves as the Acting Secretary of "The Zippers," a Chicago-based social and charity club, forwards a donation to the SCLC. She discusses the recent march from Selma to Montgomery when Alabama guardsmen respectfully removed their helmets during a prayer at the culminating rally. Williams extends a special prayer of protection for Dr. King and civil rights workers.

Letter from T. Jansma of the Dutch Baptist Union to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

T. Jansma, General Secretary of the Dutch Baptist Union, asks Dr. King to deliver a speech to Baptists in Amsterdam while he is in the city to receive an honorary degree.

Letter from MLK to Eliot Stadler

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $1000 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Dr. Eliot Stadler. In closing, the Reverend expresses interest in meeting Stadler with regard to potential aid during the summer months.

Letter to Participants in Team Ministry to Southern Cities from Jack Sisson and Oscar McCloud

Friday, May 12, 1967

Subsequent to the collective participation in the Team Ministry to Southern Cities, the members formed a consensus that a mandatory urgent meeting was necessary. The meeting will entail the regrouping of Team Ministry, community conflict, Project Equality, and the follow-up plans in three southern locations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Reverend Goulding

Reverend Goulding encloses a copy of a letter from Dr. King to Dr. Ruden.

Telegram to Mrs. J. Tower from John Howard Griffen

Thursday, June 11, 1964

This telegram documents Griffen's commentary on one of Dr. King's publications.

Letter from W.T. Durr to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Pastor Durr donates funds to help Dr. King and his efforts of nonviolence.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Oliver Kannon

Wednesday, July 11, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Kannon that Dr. King will be unable to accept the Easton NAACP's invitation to speak.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Program

Sunday, September 6, 1959

This program of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church's morning worship features Dr. King as the speaker for the service. The program further announces that Dr. King has donated one hundred dollars to the Scholarship for African students.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter from the American Embassy in New Delhi, India to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965

The Embassy of the United States invites Dr. King to come and visit India for at least a month. He can lecture in his special areas of interests. The embassy states that the best time to come is between November and April.

Letter to MLK from The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Emma Kramer, the Secretary of the Speakers Bureau, writes to Dr. King to negotiate the details of his presentation at the University of Illinois.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1961

In this letter, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King with an enclosed check to assist with the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.