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"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Karen Ladin to God

In her letter to God, Karen Ladin expresses concern for the plight of the Negro.

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

Alabama (AL), Oklahoma (OK)

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

"A Constructive Use of the Sense of Shame" is the title of this sermon outline, prepared by Dr. King. The parable of the 'Prodigal Son' is the chosen text for the sermon.

MLK's Speech on Civil Rights and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks about his role as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement and his position on the Vietnam War.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Chas. E. Elmore

Tuesday, July 30, 1963
Norfolk, VA

This letter dated July 31, 1963 was written by Dr. King to Mrs. Chas Elmore. In it he thanks her for the kind letter she wrote to him about his letter from the Birmingham Jail.

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL, Jackson, MS, North Carolina (NC), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from Mrs. Glenn Durbin to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968
New York, NY, Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Glenn Durbin writes to Dr. King expressing her opposing views on Communism.

Letter from The Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN

The Executive Committee of The Martin Luther King Fund in Sweden commends Dr. King's non-violent approach to the fight for civil rights in America. They also present Dr. King with a monetary donation raised from an earlier performance featuring Dr. King and Harry Belafonte at the Royal Opera House in Stockholm.

Jesus

Dr. King relates a quotation from General Douglas MacArthur to Jesus. According to General MacArthur, "Nobody can stop the irresistible influence of a sound idea." Dr. King argues that, though Jesus was killed, his ideas still live.

Letter from The Charlotte News to MLK

Monday, January 3, 1966
North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN)

George Willhite, of The Charlotte News, asks Dr. King to comment on accusations of him being a communist. A reader had seen a photo of Dr. King at an allegedly communist school in Tennessee. Willhite asks Dr. King to explain the circumstances of the picture.

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Statement of Mrs. Ruthie Lee Watts Regarding Death Plot on Dr. King

Selma, AL

Mrs. Watts submits a statement regarding a plot to assassinate Dr. King. She informs the FBI that a man named Jim Clark planned to kill Dr. King.

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

Friday, September 16, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.

Southern Leaders Conference letter to Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957
Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

Ministers meeting at the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration co-signed this letter to Pres. Eisenhower.

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.

Letter from Marshall C. Dandy to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Marshall C. Dendy, the Executive Secretary of the Board of Christian Education, invites Dr. King to be a speaker for the organization's conference in Montreat. Dendy also suggests that Dr. King reconsider his stance on America's involvement in Vietnam, even though he also detests war.

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter from MLK to Mr. A. Fouche

Wednesday, February 6, 1963
California (CA)

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Fouche's hospitality during his visit to the Bay Area.

Letter from Chas. W. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Chas. Bailey comments on representative Adam Clayton Powell, asserting that he cannot call himself a Christian and that he only escaped investigation because of his race. Bailey also lectures Dr. King for defending Powell.

Telegram from W. L. Battle to MLK

Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN)

Apostle W. L. Battle offers to sponsor Dr. King in a "preaching extravaganza and conference."

William M. Kunstle writes to MLK About the Shuttlesworht-Phifer Case

Monday, December 16, 1963
New York, NY

William M. Kunstler sends Dr. King the decision marks from the Shutllesworth- Phifer case. The case resulted in a victory, but took five years to draw a decision.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Barnard Holliday

Friday, November 29, 1963
Rhode Island (RI), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Reverend Holliday, Pastor at Pond Street Baptist Church, thanking him for his contribution and words of encouragement. Dr. King also encloses a receipt for his donation.

Letter from Miss Margaret Scattergood to MLK

Wednesday, January 8, 1964
DENMARK, NORWAY, SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA)

Ms. Scattergood writes to Dr. King on behalf of Dr. Peter Manniche concerning a proposition to visit Scandinavia and address citizens of Europe. Dr. Manniche asserts "For there is an important service to be done in Europe...and you could contribute so much".

Letter from Haakon Knudsen to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

The Director of Field Activities from American Baptist Convention writes Dr. King to invite him to speak at the upcoming conference for their department.

Letter from Student Michael Chernoby to MLK

Saturday, May 1, 1965
Michigan (MI), Selma, AL

Michael Chernoby, a student at West Catholic High School, offers his support to Dr. King and the movement by choosing social work as a profession. According to Chernoby, "If I can do only a fraction of the good that you have done for mankind I will consider myself a success."

Letter from Winthrop Steele to MLK

Sunday, April 30, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

Winthrop Steele writes Dr. King asserting that he was a supporter and fan of Dr. King and his civil rights doctrine until his recent remarks about the Vietnam War. Steele advises Dr. King to take a sabbatical, reexamine his views, and focus on civil rights.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

NYT Advertisement for Where Do We Go from Here?

New York, NY

This document is a New York Times advertisement for Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The title of the ad offers the synopsis: "Martin Luther King, Jr. offers a hard-headed program for what we do next."

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

INDIA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), GHANA, New York (NY), New York, NY, FRANCE, New Delhi, India, SWITZERLAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.