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Extreme Unction

Dr. King defines extreme unction from the perspective of the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthadox church.

I Have A Dream

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), CANADA

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

Letter from Frederick Koury and Albert Shanker to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Various representatives of the United Federation of Teachers in New York City inquire if Dr. King would be able and willing to speak at their upcoming Spring Conference Luncheon. Bayard Rustin will be the guest of honor and will receive the John Dewy Award.

Letter from William J. Connor to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King was the recipient of the correspondence from Mr. William J. Connor of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Connor was honored to extend a contribution to the civil rights movement. He went on to extend courtesies to Dr. King's family and Rev. Abernathy.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Education Heritage

Friday, March 13, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the Educational Heritage Company has come to an arrangement about distributing "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love." The letter goes on to say that Educational Heritage will pay a guarantee of $2500 against a royalty of 42 cent per copy sold.

Letter from MLK to David Sutton

Thursday, December 16, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Sutton of his inability to speak at Drexel Institute for the 1965-1966 calendar year. At the time of writing, Dr. King was engaged in non-violent grass roots efforts throughout the South to end racial discrimination. His commitment to community issues would oftentimes force him to refuse public speaking engagements, among other requests.

The Cartoonist's View: Make Gains In St. Augustine

Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN), St. Augustine, FL

This column features news on "gains in St. Augustine," and quotations from various sources on civil rights issues.

Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Telegram from MLK to Fred Shuttlesworth

Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King provides support and encouragement to Rev. Shuttlesworth.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, June 2, 1967
New York, NY, GERMANY

Ms. Badeker informs Dora McDonald that three copies of a contract with Econ Verlag are enclosed. She instructs that Dr. King is to sign and return the copies in order to further the German-language rights to "Where Do We Go from Here?"

Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Catherine Aller took the time to write Dr. King and encourage him to keep pursuing his goals in spite of criticism.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961
New York, NY

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

God (His Omnipotence)

Dr. King defines omnipotence as meaning that God has the power to carry out His will. He notes that God must hold characteristics of both good and evil and states that few philosophers have acknowledged God's omnipotence.

Letter from Tim Bowden to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1968
AUSTRALIA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Tim Bowden requests an interview with Dr. King for the Australian Broadcasting Commission.

Letter from MLK to Robert D. Rasmussen

Monday, December 13, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes Robert Rasmussen to express his regret for his inability to attend a Leadership Conference with the officials of the American Baptist Convention at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

MLK Requests Contributions

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King writes this fundraising letter on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He explains the campaigns taking place in Washington for the poor and urges immediate financial support for the struggle.

Pantheism Versus Living God

Here Dr. King sketches out his views on "...the Biblical idea of the 'Living God,'" and the substitution of Christ for God "as far as piety is concerned."

Letter from Rev. A. S. Markham to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964
CANADA

Reverend Markham, Executive Head of the British Methodist Episcopal Church and Executive of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto, informs Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Sholom Synagogue would like to present an award to him. The award honors a person who has contributed to "the needs of humanity in a most outstanding manner."

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter from Tom Edward Ross to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL

Tom Edward Ross informs Dr. King of a piece of artwork he created of Dr. King. An effort to publish the piece in the Houston Chronicle was unsuccessful. Ross seeks Dr. King's assistance in promoting the sale of the piece.

Letter from Horace Sheffield to MLK

Saturday, September 23, 1961
Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL

Mr. Sheffield sends Dr. King a press release that discusses a Trade Union Leadership Council telegram to Dr. J.H. Jackson in response to his remarks regarding Dr. King and the Freedom Movement.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, London, England, PAKISTAN, INDIA, CONGO / ZAIRE

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

Letter from Gloria Cantor to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York, NY

Gloria Cantor, of Belafonte Enterprises, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting copies of Dr. King's speech at the Spring Mobilization.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Georgia (GA)

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Judgment

ISRAEL

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.

Statement on the Indictment of MLK

Thursday, March 3, 1960
Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Orangeburg, SC, Birmingham, AL, Nashville, TN, Tallahassee, FL, Little Rock, AR

The "Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr." issued this statement, accusing the state of Alabama of falsely distorting Dr. King's 1958 income tax return in an attempt to indict him.

Science and Religion

Dr. King wrote this essay while enrolled at Crozer Theological Seminary, circa 1948-1951. The thrust of Dr. King's stance is that "there never was a conflict between religion and science as such."

Letter from Curtis Harris to MLK

Monday, February 1, 1965
Virginia (VA)

Curtis W. Harris, of the Virginia State Unit of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, wrote to Dr. King to alert him that the Smithfield Packing Company has a labor situation very similar to that of Scripto in Atlanta. Harris explains that none of the senior Negro employees are in the appropriate income bracket and could use Dr. King's assistance.

Letter from Paul Sturges to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Rev. Paul Sturges invites Dr. King to address the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Baptist Convention.