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Letter from MLK to S. P. Belcher

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King express gratitude for the receipt of financial support during an event at the Palasis des Sports. In addition, Dr. King highlights the importance of the demonstration for international concerns of the French and American communities in Paris.

Letter from MLK to Clara Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King responds to Clara Bell Graves thanking her for the encouraging letter. Dr. King states, "please be assured that we welcome with grateful heart such letters as the one you directed to me."

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

Friday, November 4, 1966

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

Introduction of MLK

These notes are from an introduction written about Dr. King and presumably delivered before he gave an address. Dr. King, who remains unnamed, is presented as a man whose record precedes him given that his life and work has had so profound an impact upon his time.

Letter from Andrew Young to Professor G. Kuiper

Tuesday, November 2, 1965

Andrew Young, the Executive Assistant to Dr. King, writes Professor Kuiper of Vrije Universiteit expressing his contentment with pair's recent visit to Amsterdam. Young also inquires about the Dutch institution covering the civil rights leaders' travel expenses.

Letter from Paul Yelter to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1967

Signed by twenty-one supporters, this letter requests that Dr. King make a public statement about his disapproval of the 1968 Olympic Boycott by American Negro athletes. The authors argue that the boycott will ruin a chance for Negro athletes to prove their equality to white athletes.

Justice in Mississippi

Dora McDonald records notes by Dr. King concerning an unjust ruling in Mississippi. He claims that more legislation is needed to enable the federal courts to prosecute these crimes.

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

Progress

Dr. King quotes from Browning's "A Death in the Desert."

Initiative for Peace in Vietnam

Friday, March 10, 1967

Philip Noel-Baker and Father George Dominique Pire describe the formation of the Initiative for Peace in Vietnam and its efforts.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Congressional Record: The President's Housing Bill, or, How To Succeed in Politics Without Really Trying

Senator Charles Percy forwarded this article, published in the Congressional Record, to Dr. King. The article discusses President Johnson's attempted housing referendum, known as the Fair Housing Bill, in March of 1968.

Pamphlet from the Child Development Group of Mississippi

This pamphlet is entitled "Histories Of: Children, Employees, Centers, Community Support." The organization, sponsored by the Child Development Center of Mississippi, is a statewide Head Start program that was organized in the summer of 1965.

Letter from A. Martin to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

A. Martin expresses his support for Dr. King's work, but advises Dr. King not to run for President. Martin also shares his thoughts about which candidates he considers best suited for the role of President.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In the 3rd installment of "The Martin Luther King Column," Dr. King praises the Jewish people for seeking freedom for all. Dr. King discusses their contributions to "philanthropy and social organization."

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

Jo Marks writes Harry Belafonte Regarding Civil Rights Help

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Jo Marks writes Mr. Harry Belafonte a lengthy letter about the civil rights situation in Houston and to request that he perform at the Astrodome.

Letter from Senator Thomas H. Kuchel to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

California Republican Senator Thomas H. Kuchel writes Dr. King thanking him his letter celebrating the recent passage in the Senate of the Civil Rights bill.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Goodwin

Monday, August 12, 1963

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's request for Mr. Daniel Goodwin to participate in the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms.

Anti-Slavery and Reform Papers

Harvest House Limited, a publishing company, announce the release of Henry David Thoreau's essay collection regarding anti-slavery and reform.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

Letter from George Richard to MLK

George Richard asks Dr. King for books on demonstrations, and he also asks Dr. King to visit his town.

Letter from Julius H. Avery to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966

Julius H. Avery notifies Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta for a conference at the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. Mr. Avery further requests that during his visit to the city, he and Dr. King arrange a meeting.

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

Friday, December 11, 1964

This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.

U.S. Vice Presidential Address

Friday, June 24, 1955

These Excerpts from a Vice Presidential address made on June 24, 1955 boast the claim of moving all Americans closer to achieving the American Dream regardless of race, creed or color. The vice President lists five reasons for the success of the Eisenhower Administration in emproving equal opportunities for all Americans, including Negroes.

Letter from William H. Booth to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Commission on Human Rights Chairman William Booth invites Dr. King and a designated representative to a conference in New York entitled, "Testing Human Potential - New Techniques for Selecting Employees from Minority Groups."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."

Letter from Richard Landau of Antioch College to MLK

Friday, January 29, 1965

Richard Landau, Editor of The Antiochian, writes Dr. King requesting a photograph and "biographical data sheet" for a story about his upcoming appearance as the commencement speaker.

Jesus

Dr. King outlines some thoughts on the effect Jesus' life had on his followers.

Letter from John Dempsey to S. Ernest Vandiver

Monday, July 30, 1962

Connecticut governor John Dempsey writes to Georgia governor S. Earnest Vandiver expressing his concern for the safety of Dr. King and his associates.