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"UKRAINE"

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Friday, December 15, 1967

Michigan State University Associate Professor Robert Green sends Dr. King the final report of the Chicago Adult Education Project funded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Suffering (Psalms)

Dr. King references the biblical Book of Psalms regarding the topic of suffering.

Prayer

Dr. King notes William James' description of prayer.

Anonymous Support for MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1960

An anonymous individual expresses his or her support and concerns about Dr. King's affiliation with presidential candidate John F. Kennedy.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Monday, February 19, 1968

Norman Thomas sends Dr. King an enclosure, which supports Senator Fulbright's statements concerning the use of nuclear weapons in Vietnam. He asks Dr. King to stand in solidarity with him on this issue by adding his name to the statement.

Royalty Statement for a Payot Published Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement for a French-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" documents royalties earned in 1966.

Letter from James H. Duckrey to MLK

Wednesday, March 11, 1964

James H. Duckrey, President of Cheyney State College, writes Dr. King asking him to serve as the Commencement Speaker. He briefly discusses the history of the college and informs Dr. King of the Honorarium.

Letter from Kivie Kaplan to MLK Regarding His NewBook

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

In this letter, Kaplan requests an autographed copy of Dr. King's new book enclosed with a personal message. Mr. Kaplan also requests that Dr. King autograph the books ordered from Harper & Row, since he gets a discount buying in bulk.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Letter from Gaye Breitel to MLK

Gaye Breitel, a ten year old from New York, writes Dr. King to request an autographed photo or book with a recent picture.

MLK Address to a North Carolina Branch of the NAACP

Sunday, September 25, 1960

Dr. King addresses a public meeting of Charlotte, North Carolina's NAACP branch. He lists five actions the Negro can do to assist America with realizing the dream. The Negro must challenge the system of segregation, make efforts to gain ballots, and sacrifice to achieve freedom.

And There Was Love

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Major J. Jones writes to Dr. King, offering to host the SCLC's Annual Spring Board Meeting in Chattanooga, where he is a district superintendent of the Methodist Church. Mr. Jones mentions that having the SCLC in Chattanooga would help the city. However, Dr. King couldn't accept Mr. Jones' invitation due to prior arrangements to host the 1965 SCLC Spring Board Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

Letter Victoria Gist to MLK about a Speaking Engagement

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

Mrs. Victoria Gist, State President of the Hospitality Group, requests that Dr. King speak at a banquet for the State Youth Congress. She provides transportation instructions and contact information.

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

The Montgomery Story

Wednesday, June 27, 1956

Dr. King delivers an address entitled the "Montgomery Story" at the NAACP 47th Annual Convention. He address several issues throughout the address including: segregation, civil rights, equality, slavery and religion.

News from the American Jewish Committee

Friday, February 23, 1968

A seminar will be held in New York concerning the Christian and Jewish perspectives on the "meaning of Israel in the wake of the recent Mid-East crisis." The newsletter also states who will speak and what qualifications they posses.

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding a Japanese Edition

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, requests permission from Dr. King to proceed with the Japanese edition of his book "Strength to Love" per the terms outlined in her letter of April 13.

Note from Will Dale to MLK

Will Dale writes Dr. King commending him for encouraging Black athletes to boycott the Olympic games.

Letter from MLK to the SCLC Executive Staff

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Dr. King informs the SCLC's Executive Board of a special meeting that will take place at Beamon's Restaurant. Outlined are the staff members who are expected to be in attendance and the topics they will review.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK about Request

Monday, October 26, 1964

Alfred Duckett writes this letter to Dr. King in order to remind Dr. King of his desire to have a magazine article or television special done on him and stresses the need to present Dr. King's role "not only as a civil rights leader, but also as a father, pastor, husband, and administrator of a steadily-growing national organization." Mr. Duckett also presents the terms of a proposed publishing contract, should he wish to become a part of the project.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Memo to SCLC Contributors

This memo from the SCLC Staff highlights political activity taking place in Louisville, Kentucky, Blue Ridge, Georgia, and Cleveland, Ohio. The organization had used the energy from demonstrations to fuel voter registration campaigns. They share stories of collaborations and success that have resulted from their efforts.

Post Card from Critic to MLK

This unstamped post card comes from a writer who identifies himself as "Ole Dorky" and targets Dr. King and the American Civil Liberties Union as "Communist skum." The writer disagrees with the work of civil rights and believes that efforts are "making matters worse for negroes."

Letter from MLK to Wesley A. Hotchkiss

Tuesday, March 1, 1966

Dr. King thanks Dr. Wesley A. Hotchkiss from the United Church of Christ for his generous contribution of $11,000 to the SCLC. King includes a list of how they money will be spent to assist with voter registration.

Operation Breadbasket As Vision, Promise and Hope

This report discusses the socio-economic position of Negroes as it relates to education achievement, employment opportunities, and access to power and societal institutions.

Letter from Chas. W. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Chas. Bailey comments on representative Adam Clayton Powell, asserting that he cannot call himself a Christian and that he only escaped investigation because of his race. Bailey also lectures Dr. King for defending Powell.

Letter from Richard L. Zanglin to MLK

Wednesday, August 9, 1967

Richard L. Zanglin invites Dr. King to speak to the student body at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio.