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Support Negro Businesses

Tuesday, November 1, 1966
Atlanta, GA

From November 1966 newspaper ad: "Support Negro Business" advertisement from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY), San Francisco, CA, Chicago, IL, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, Geneva, Switzerland, Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Letter from Jessie Treichler of Antioch College to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, August 16, 1962
Ohio (OH), North Carolina (NC), Albany, GA

On behalf of Antioch College, Jessie Treichler invites Dr. King to speak and Mrs. King to perform at the college. She informs Mrs. King of the honorarium and requests a tentative response.

Letter from MLK to Elder Grant

Dr. King declines an earlier proposal suggested by Mr. Grant, due to a lack of resources and time.

Telegram from Philip A. Randolph to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966
New York (NY)

Philip A. Randolph writes Dr. King concerning Negro leaders being invited to discuss problems of the movement on NBC television.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Los Angeles, CA

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Telegram from Alexander Edelmann to MLK

Nebraska (NE), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Alexander Edelmann, a professor from the University of Nebraska, criticizes Dr. King for not taking a stance against black rioters in Atlanta. Edelmann mentions the he once was a supporter of Dr. King, but now considers him "irresponsible."

Letter from Larry M. Otter & Alan Aftanski to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968
Maryland (MD)

Mount Saint Mary's College's Young Democratic and Young Republican Clubs inform Dr. King of their preparation for the National Collegiate Primary, Choice '68. Dr. King has been named a candidate in the mock election, so the organizers request information about his views. They also tell Dr. King that a speaking engagement can be arranged if Dr. King's schedule brings him to the Maryland area.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

Racism in the United States

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Albany, GA

Dr. King discusses the issues of racism, Jim Crow and nonviolence in this edition of Current. He further explains that, without the tactic of nonviolence, Negroes can become hostile and bitter. Throughout this issue several other writers are featured including Leslie W. Dunbar, Langston Hughes and Fay Bennett.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to General James M. Gavin

Friday, March 29, 1968
Cambridge, MA

Harry H. Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes to General James M. Gavin, regarding a previously postponed meeting with Dr. King. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the necessity of Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign.

Two Noted Rights Workers Added to Staff of SCEF

New Orleans, LA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article explains Ella J. Baker and John R. Salter were added to the New Orleans based Southern Christian Educational Fund shortly before its headquarters were raided by more than 100 policemen on October 4th.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Saturday, June 23, 1962
Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

MLK Report: Annual Address, MIA

Thursday, December 3, 1959
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, ITALY, FRANCE, GERMANY, Virginia (VA), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA)

In his final address to the Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King gives a status report on the various initiatives of the organization. He also gives a final farewell in hopes that the MIA is challenged to continue to fight in the struggle for equality.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Monday, May 11, 1959
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Letter from Aubrey Brown Jr. to MLK

Monday, June 26, 1967
Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Aubrey Brown Jr., Editor of "The Presbyterian Outlook," asks Dr. King to provide a statement regarding the obligations American voters have to choose "officials who have high personal moral standards." The statement will be used in the publication's annual "Going to College" Handbook.

Letter to Dr. King from Elder G.W. Watkins

Friday, August 2, 1957
Texas (TX)

Elder G. W. Watkins writes Dr. King requesting that he and his organization join the fight to regain Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) title as the Heavy Weight Boxing Champion of the World.

Letter from MLK to E. D. Johnson

Monday, April 30, 1962
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to E. D. Johnson's letter expressing appreciation for encouragement by providing knowledge regarding the arrogance of Mr. Johnson's son. Dr. King stresses the importance of valuing the internal factors of self-respect, integrity and selflessness, opposed to the external factors of color, skin and wealth.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes G. W. Knox on religion from the Harvard Theological Review.

Telegram from President Johnson to Bernard Lee

Sunday, May 29, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's special assistant, Bernard Lee, was the recipient of this telegram requesting his presence at a White House conference called by President Johnson. The theme of the conference was "To Fulfill These Rights."

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

Friday, September 29, 1967
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISRAEL

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

MLK Address to the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Lowndes County, AL, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, North Carolina (NC), EGYPT, CUBA, VIETNAM

Dr. King, at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses numerous civil rights issues the organization is addressing throughout America.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Campbell to MLK

Monday, August 24, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Delaware (DE), New Jersey (NJ), Maryland (MD)

The Philadelphia District of The Methodist Youth Fellowship asks Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at an upcoming freedom rally.

Letter from Erma Jewell Hughes to MLK

Wednesday, February 12, 1964
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Erma Jewell Hughes writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize award and cover on Time Magazine as "Man of the Year." Hughes invites the Reverend to speak at the Business College's annual commencement and encloses traveling expenses for the event. Hughes also states that they are raising additional funds to go towards the "Freedom Fight."

Letter from Eleanor S. Greve to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Eleanor Greve writes Dr. King to express the encouragement and inspiration she and her husband felt while reading a portion of Dr. King's speech in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The speech was given before the Chicago Area Committee for a Sane Nuclear policy.

Letter to Twelve Southern Governors

Dr. King addresses twelve southern governors regarding the urgency of a unification between the Negro community and government leaders. Dr. King requests a meeting between the governors and himself to address and resolve their issues concerning race relations.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

New York, NY, Baltimore, MD, North Carolina (NC), CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CUBA, Birmingham, AL, LIBERIA, Detroit, MI

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, Montgomery, AL

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Thank You Letter from MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
Connecticut (CT)

MLK wrote this thank you note to a supporter, Mrs. C.C. White, at a time when some former supporters were worried about a lack of racial unity or SCLC's position against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Vivian S. Florence to MLK

Sunday, November 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

Ms. Florence informs Dr. King she has sent two other letters to the SCLC, both of which included contributions from the United Mine Workers of America. She expresses concern regarding mail tampering due to Dr. King's notoriety.