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Our Pastor: A Characterization of Dr. Martin Luther King Sr.

Atlanta, GA

This document portrays a picture of Dr. King Sr. with an excerpt written by Emily Dodson McCrary.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Kennedy

Thursday, January 25, 1962
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding the safety of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth during his 90 day jail sentence.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Mr. James Harrison

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

The Chicago Adult Education Department provides the Behavior Research Laboratories with the needed funds to amend the budget for their contract. Robert L. Green provides Mr. James Harrison with the distribution location for this contribution.

Letter from Michelle Feinberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 6, 1963
Indiana (IN)

Michelle Feinberg, a student in a special education class, writes Dr. King a letter about what she has been learning. She also asks Dr. King to send her a letter and a picture for their school.

Hell (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nikolai Berdyaev on the concept of hell.

Schleiermacher (Christianity)

Dr. King cites a quote by philosopher Schleiermacher regarding "the God-consciousness."

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on State of the Union Address

Wednesday, January 12, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King praises President Johnson for his State of the Union address. King expresses appreciation for Johnson's continued commitment to the Great Society, his call for legislation to protect those pursuing their constitutional rights and his pledge to work diligently to end the Vietnam War.

Resolution for the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives

Washington, D.C.

This document is a resolution that explains the rules for current and incoming members of the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966
Atlanta, GA

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.

He Was a Moment in the Conscience of Man

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

This article discusses the importance of preserving Dr. King's teachings and legacy.

Letter from Jessie Tidwell to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

Jessie Tidwell writes Dr. King wishing him the best of luck and expressing interest in meeting him in person.

Letter from John Brush to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

John W. Brush expresses his dissent with Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts for changing his stance on the Vietnam War. Brush also commends Dr. King on his oppositional stance.

Letter from Jimmie Wattson to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1962
Virginia (VA)

An inmate at the Virginia State Penitentiary requests Dr. King's help with his legal situation. The sender informs Dr. King that he is serving a fifteen-year sentence for second-degree murder although he did not get a fair trial. He claims he has written government officials to appeal his case, however he cannot "seem to get any consideration." The inmate asks Dr. King to write him back and let him know what information is required for further assistance.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

Birmingham, AL, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Letter from J. V. Jones to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM

J.V. Jones questions whether Dr. King's position on the Vietnam war is helping the black race because he believes otherwise. Jones also encloses a Walter Winchell article from the Los Angeles Harold Examiner.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967
Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CAMBODIA, THAILAND, BURMA / MYANMAR, GERMANY, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

Friday, August 16, 1963
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Letter from Cass Canfield to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 28, 1966
New York, NY

Cass Canfield from Harper & Row, Publishers thanks Joan Daves for sending the outline of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here." Cass suggests that in the book Dr. King "should stress that the Negro problem is part of the poverty problem."

Satan

Dr. King records a note on the Bok of Job, chapter 1, verses 11 and 12.

Statement by MLK in San Francisco

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

Dr. King gives an address in San Francisco regarding race relations, equality, and segregation. Dr. King charges people from all communities to unite so that hope can be created for others.

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.C. Dobbins

Monday, October 21, 1963
Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King informs Rev. Dobbins that he is unable to meet with him in the next few months, but possibly will be able to in the coming spring.

Letter from Charles A. Halleck to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Charles A. Halleck expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter outlining his reasons for opposing the seating of the five congressmen for the state of Mississippi.

Fact Sheet on the Raid of the SCEF

Friday, November 22, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

This document highlights the raid on the New Orleans headquarters of the Southern Conference Educational Fund by State and City Police.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.

Letter from Lee Tishler to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

Ms. Lee Tishler gives support and praise to Dr. King for speaking out against the conflict in Vietnam.

Women Are For Peace/Jeanette Rankin Rank and File Poster

Washington, D.C., Brooklyn, NY, New York, NY

Flyer announcing "Women are for Peace" sponsored by Former Congresswoman Jeannette Rankin. Representative Rankin led thousands of women to Washington, DC to petition former colleagues in Congress to end the war.

Social Ethics

Dr. King refers to Micah 3:9-12, saying the prophet condemns the love of money of civil and religious leaders. King wonders whether religious leaders today should be paid for their work and concludes that money should never be a priority over service.

Anaximenes

Dr. King writes notes about the views of philosopher Anaximenes on the universe, comparing them to those of Thales and Anaximander.

God (Zephaniah)

ISRAEL

Dr. King discusses the Book of Zephaniah which includes the perception of God and the people of Israel.

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958
Philadelphia, PA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.