Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"UKRAINE"

Fundamentalism

Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Monday, December 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Martin Gal to MLK

Thursday, August 8, 1963
Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Martin Gal, Producer in Public Affairs at WMSB TV, requests permission rights to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for broadcasting purposes. Gal seeks to create a short pictorial documentary with Dr. King reading the text as a voice-over.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

Letter from MLK to Ralph McGill

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. King writes to Ralph McGill of the Atlanta Constitution to clarify his position on the Vietnam War. Dr. King considers his objection to the war to be a matter of conscience, and not one of political expediency.

Highlander Folk School April 1961 News Release

Monday, April 3, 1961
Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC)

The Citizen Education Program efforts and past accomplishments are outlined in this document.

Telegram to Reverend Frank Mitchell from MLK

Friday, March 9, 1962
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King express his condolence for the passing of Reverend Frank Mitchell's mother. Dr. King asserts the strength of the Christian faith that will allow Reverend Mitchell to gain consolation.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Plea for Assistance from Lucille Griffin to MLK

Saturday, September 3, 1966
Ohio (OH)

In this letter, Lucille Griffin asked for Dr. King's aid in obtaining satisfaction regarding an insurance dispute resulting from a home damaging storm.

Letter from MLK to Viva O'Dean Sloan

Wednesday, October 17, 1962
Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to Viva O'Dean Sloan's letter, extending his appreciation for her support of the Congress of Racial Equality. He regretfully informs her he does not know of anyone in the Dearborn, Michigan area who might be interested in the purchase of her property there.

John Duns Scotus

UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE

Dr. King records these notes about the life of John Duns Scotus, a noted Scottish philosopher and theologian of the High Middle Ages.

Inter-Faith Mass Meeting

Sunday, June 11, 1967
Cincinnati, OH, Atlanta, GA

This program is for an Inter-Faith Mass Meeting that was co-sponsored by Mt. Zion Baptist Church and Zion Baptist Church. The meeting took place on June 11, 1967 and features Dr. King as the speaker.

Letter from Roger Threats to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Roger Threats, a student from New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King death. In the letter, Threats describes his own dream, which is an end to fighting.

Letter from Betty Doocy to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967
Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Mississippi (MS)

Betty Doocy of Chicago, Illinois mildly criticizes Dr. King for leading marches in an effort to integrate neighborhoods in Chicago. She tells Dr. King of her experiences living in poverty as a non-Negro, and how her family has been able to survive and endure hardships. Doocy encourages Dr. King to instruct Negroes to properly take care of their living quarters and to be respectable in their job professions.

Western Union Telegram from Barrington Dunbar to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY)

In this telegram, Barrington Dunbar of the peace and social committee from New York, informs Dr. King of the support from his religious society.

Telegram from MLK to Family of Marshall Shepherd

Friday, February 24, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King offers condolences and encouragement to the bereaved family of Marshall Shepherd, a Minister at Mt. Olivet Tabernacle Church in Philadelphia. Due to a previous commitment, Dr. King will be unable to attend the funeral.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Letter from John and Enid Howarth to Friends Soliciting Financial Support

Sunday, June 26, 1966
New Mexico (NM), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Mr. and Mrs. Howarth of New Mexico express their disapproval of violence against Negroes in the South and request donations for a Fourth of July celebration in support of SCLC, SNCC and other civil rights groups.

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967
North Carolina (NC)

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Suggestions for SCLC Mobilization of Jobs and Income

Friday, February 9, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

This document outlines suggestions given by The North City Congress, a federation of independent groups concerned with North Central Philadelphia. The Congress seeks to enable the community to exercise a strong voice in government and social welfare operations pertaining to the improvement of surrounding ghettos. Included is a summary of recommendations and detailed points of consideration.

Job and Suffering

Dr. King writes on the biblical figure Job and his view of suffering.

Letter from MLK to Abby Seldes

Friday, January 31, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King dictates a response letter to Miss Abby Seldes expressing his heartwarming appreciation to the young lady. He also expresses gratitude towards Abby's parents for attending the March On Washington demonstration.

Promotional Ad in Publisher's Weekly for "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, March 8, 1964
New York (NY)

This ad, published in Publisher's Weekly, serves to promote Dr.King's book "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from Frank Randolph Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, April 17, 1968
Texas (TX)

Frank Randolph highlights how Dr. King "brought to light" many things that were once unseen. Mr. Randolph writes this letter subsequent to the assassination of Dr. King and notes that he would like copies of the "I Have a Dream" speech. The writer is apparently unaware of Dr. King's death.

MLK to the Second Precinct Clergymen's Association

Thursday, March 26, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King gives a statement to the Second Precinct Clergymen's Association in Washington, D. C. regarding voter registration and the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts, "I understand that voter registration here has reached a mark just short of 170,000."

Telegram to MLK from 347 AFL-CIO Armours Lard Refinery Workers

Chicago, IL, New York, NY

The Local 347 of the AFL-CIO sent this Western Union Telegram to Dr. King as an expression of their hopes for his recovery, during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

A Statement to the South and Nation

Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

Barth

Dr. King writes on Barth's stance on the authoritative values of the Bible "in the tradition of Calvin."

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Texas (TX)

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.