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God

Dr. King cites Sigmund Freud's view in "New Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis" that the need for religion stems from the Oedipus complex.

Letter from Leonard L. Brooks to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Portland campus of the University of Maine requests Dr. King to speak to the student body in support of Choice '68 National Collegiate Presidential Primary.

Proposed Program: Lincoln Memorial

This program entails several male and female speakers who are deeply rooted and connected in the Civil Rights Movement. These speakers were expected to speak at the Lincoln Memorial.

Chicago Housing Discrimination Complaint

Friday, April 29, 1966

This official complaint to the Illinois Department of Registration and Education references a particular instance of housing discrimination that took place at the Houser Real Estate office.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Albert Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation" on the place Christ holds in Christianity as its historical founders.

Letter from MLK to Brothers-in-Christ

Friday, February 28, 1964

Dr. King requests the participation of those receiving the letter. He encourages members of congregations to attend the Freedom Rally and urges churches to partake in Freedom Sunday.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Eugene Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addresses multiple issues that were misunderstood. He then encourages Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions and informs him that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Letter from Paul D. Metzger to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Paul D. Metzger, President of the Student Association at Central High School, writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at a forum concerning the issues of civil rights in America. Dr. King's response to this invitation is enclosed at the culmination of the letter.

Letter From A.H. Emmott to MLK

Thursday, February 6, 1964

A. H. Emmott congratulates Dr. King on winning Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" award and invites him to speak at the Annual Convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities in Canada. The UMBC is an organization, which represents the interests of local governments within the Province of British Columbia.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Mary Bonaventure

The author writes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy to express how impressed she was with the events surrounding Dr. King's funeral. She also made a lengthy request for mementos of the funeral service and Dr. King's speeches.

Adverse Postcard

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

The author of this postcard questions the concept of Black Power and informs Dr. King of his dismay for integration.

Note to MLK from Mrs. Ed Brooke

This note from Mrs. Ed Brooke is extremely negative towards Dr. King, accusing him of inciting riots and calling him names.

Comment On Proposed Resolution: Ending Racism in the Democratic Party

Friday, October 9, 1964

On October 9th, 1964, the Democratic National Convention adopted a resolution ending racial discrimination in Party membership.

Letter from Laurence Pollinger to Joan Daves

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Laurence Pollinger Limited writes to Joan Daves, Literary Agent for Dr. King, to make an offer for the advances and royalties to be received from the publication of "Where Do We Go From Here?" A request is also made for permission to change the title to Chaos or Community.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Quasi Positivism

Dr. King outlines philosopher Alfred North Whitehead's views on the relationship between metaphysics and the philosophy of science. Referencing Whitehead's work "The Concept of Nature," this note card contains a quote from the original text and also paraphrases Whitehead's writings.

Letter from Sidney M. Peck to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

On behalf of the University Circle Teach-In Committee, Western Reserve University Professor Sydney Peck invites Dr. King to speak about the Vietnam War at a conference on US foreign policy.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Ralph J. Bunche sends an invitation to Dr. King, asking him to join the International Sponsors Committee at the New School for Social Research in New York City. This committee was developed in honor of Norman Thomas, an advocate for human rights.

Christianity and Crisis: April 3, 1967

Monday, April 3, 1967

Roger L. Shinn wrote this article for Christianity and Crisis: A Christian Journal of Opinion. Shinn defines a "conscientious objector" as one who believes a war morally unjustifiable, and chooses, therefore, not to serve in it. Several Christian organizations attempted to introduce legislation banning forced participation. The American Civil Liberties Union has encouraged the selective service system to recognize a policy "under which no person shall be compelled to participate in armed conflict when he believes it to be in violation of his conscience."

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King outlines the two assumptions that one must have while studying the work of Kierkegaard.

Letter from A. T. Walden to MLK

Thursday, June 7, 1962

A . T. Walden writes to Dr. King congratulating him on the performance of the SCLC lead program featuring the singing and acting of Harry Belafonte. Walden continues to express his belief by stating that the Reverend fills a unique role in the American dream of brotherhood and equality.

Letter from Harold Franklin to MLK

Saturday, May 2, 1964

Harold Franklin expresses appreciation to Dr. King for granting him scholarship aid.

Letter from the Interseminary Movement's John Robert Nelson to MLK

Friday, August 31, 1962

J. Robert Nelson, National Chairman of the Interseminary Committee, invites Dr. King to be a part of their national conference with theological professors and students for the following year. He hopes that Dr. King will be the speaker on the subject of the Strategy of Churches and Ministers for Social Change.

Letter from Norman Edward & Katherine Kowal to SCLC

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Impressed by a sermon delivered by Dr. King, Norman Edward and Katherine Ann Kowal contributes to the SCLC.

Speech to SCLC Convention about Vietnam

Thursday, August 12, 1965

Dr. King makes one of his first public statements opposing the war in Vietnam during the SCLC Convention held in Birmingham. According to King, "Neither the American people nor the people of North Vietnam is the enemy. The true enemy is war itself, and people on both sides are trapped in its inexorable destruction."

Telegram from Curtis W. Harris to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 5, 1965

Curtis Harris, President of the Virginia State unit of the SCLC, asks Miss McDonald to confirm some scheduled dates that have been previously discussed with Dr. King.

Letter to Dora McDonald from F. Fishman

Friday, October 27, 1967

This document is a correspondence between Mr. Frank Fishman and Miss. Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary. Mr. Fishman had enclosed a copy of a letter dated July 25 and his letter September 25, enquiring that he did not receive a reply about his script that was sent back July 25, 1967.

Worship

Dr. King references William Ernest Hocking and James Bissett Pratt regarding religious worship.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Sunday, November 29, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, includes a summary of several foreign contracts drawn on Dr. King's behalf for three of his books.