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"UNITED KINGDOM"

Letter from Representative Thomas G. Morris to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

New Mexico Congressman Thomas Morris writes Dr. King to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram requesting Morris' opposition to House Bill 585, which would dismiss five recently elected members. Morris does not indicate his position in the matter.

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Letter from Dolly Davis to MLK

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Dolly Davis, Publicity Director of the John Day Company publishers, writes Dr. King to request his reaction to Harold Isaac's book, "The New World of Negro Americans." Davis asks permission to quote his comments and sends him the advance galleys.

Telegram from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman Guyot to MLK

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman expresses concern regarding the SCLC's exclusion of "indigenous people of various political orientation in preparing the program" for the annual convention held in Jackson, MS.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Dora McDonald sends H. L. Wynter, Registrar for the University of the West Indies, an estimate on travel expenses Dr. King and Reverend Lee will require for their trip to Jamaica.

Letter from William Johnston to MLK

Monday, September 9, 1963

William Johnston of the Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa, writes Wyatt Tee Walker to inform him of an upcoming trip being made by Reverend Alphaeus H. Zulu in Atlanta. Johnston asks that the Reverend reserve a time to meet with Bishop Zulu during his short stay in the city.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Letter from Lucius D. Clay to MLK

Sunday, June 16, 1963

Retired Army Officer Lucius D. Clay, responds to Dr. King, informing him that his telegram has be forwarded to T. C. Fogarty.

Sin

Dr. King interprets Leviticus 4:3, a verse which implies that a community can incur guilt for the sins of its high priest.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. R. Schippers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Rev. Young informs Dr. Schippers of arrival details for an upcoming trip to Amsterdam, Holland.

Letter from Clara Sturgas Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1961

Clara Sturgas Johnson sends Dr. King a Christmas card with an enclosed article about the integration marches in Albany, Georgia.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

The Nature of Hell

Citing numerous Biblical passages, the anonymous writer provides an analysis of the nature of hell and provides brief instructions on how to avoid it. The writer describes the duration of hell as "unlimited and eternal," while the physical environment is, as described in the Bible, "a lake of fire." In order to avoid hell, one must "believe and obey the gospel of Christ."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Monday, June 22, 1964

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Tuesday, January 15, 1963

Mrs. King sends birthday wishes to Dr. King.

Abelard

Dr. King quotes 12th century French philosopher Peter Abelard on the relationship between doubt, inquiry and truth.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".

Support Card from Ida White and Jenae Jackson to MLK

Ida Mae White and Jenae Jackson send Dr. King this spiritual card regarding faith in God during his time in jail.

SNCC Annual Conference Program 1960

Sunday, October 16, 1960

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee concludes their annual conference with a rally featuring prominent student leaders. This program outlines the itinerary for the last event of the three day conference and includes SNCC's Statement of Purpose.

Letter from Leonard Manning to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Leonard Manning offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Jim Robert Davis to MLK

Jim Robert Davis tells Dr. King how his presence in Chicago's Lawndale community have caused many of his fellow neighbors to clean their neighborhood. He pens a small but inspriational poem under the subject "The Glory of Blackmen."

Letter from Reverend R.V. Brown to MLK about Moral Support

In this letter Reverend R.V. Brown offers his moral support to Dr.King.

SCLC-CCCO Chicago Freedom Festival

The Chicago Freedom Festival was designed to raise funds to end slums and segregation in Chicago. The festival will feature an address by Dr. King and an all-star show.

Letter from Robert Carter and D. John Heyman to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968

The National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing (NCDH) sends Dr. King a report, which examined "where the jobs are and where those who need them most now live." According to the NCDH, the study shows that jobs are not in the same geographic area where Negroes and other minorities live.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

U.S. Vice President Hubert Humphrey commends Dr. King on the work of the Urban Coalition. He also informs Dr. King of his intent to work together to meet common goals.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Program for Mass Meeting with MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Dr. King spoke at the Scott High School Field House in Toledo. Mayor John W. Potter opened the program with an official welcome to the city and Rev. Robert Culp welcomed the prticipants on behalf of the Toledo Chapter of the NAACP. Rev. B. F. Wright, the President of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Toledo and Vicinity, gave the benediction.

The Man Who Was a Fool

The sermon "The Man Who Was a Fool," was published in the June 1961 issue of the journal The Pulpit. Dr. King delivered the sermon in both Chicago and Detroit in early 1961.

Letter from Usher Board of Saint Luke Community Church to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

The Usher Board of the Saint Luke Community Christian Church invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker at their church.