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Constitution and Bylaws of the SCLC

Atlanta, GA

This booklet contains the constitution and bylaws of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Memo from Harry Boyte to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Mr. Boyte asks Dr. King to review the document "ACTION FOR DEMOCRACY." He also attaches two tables for his review.

Letter from Client's Law Firm to MLK

Tuesday, September 20, 1966

Green, Ayers, Swigert, and Cluster write a letter to Dr. King requesting that he speak to Randolph T. Blackwell and encourage him to acknowledge receipt of a poem.

Unitarianism

Dr. King describes the theology of Unitarianism as being a contrast to Trinitarianism.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959
NIGERIA, Georgia (GA), Ohio (OH), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

The Scope of Philosophy

Dr. King notes that Alfred North Whitehead, in “Concept of Nature,” “Religion in the Making” and “Principles of Natural Knowledge,” seeks to isolate the philosophy of science from metaphysics.

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967
New York, NY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Atlanta, GA

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL)

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

MLK to Bill Moyers of Newsday

Friday, May 19, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King writes to Bill Moyers of NEWSDAY and apologizes for not responding to his letter in a timely manner.

Letter from Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966
Boston, MA

Dana McLean Greeley, President of the Unitarian Universalist Association, asks Dr. King to lend his name to a letter addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The letter, which was drafted at the request of the Inter-Religious Peace Conference, requests an interview with President Johnson. Dr. King's handwriting appears on the top right of this letter, saying that he would be happy to allow them to use his name in this context.

Letter from Robert G. Lippmann to MLK

Saturday, November 16, 1963
Utah (UT), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

Robert G. Lippmann requests a copy of the sermon Dr. King delivered at the Sixth Avenue Baptist Church for the funeral services of Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Diane Wesley.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Lucile Giles

Tuesday, December 10, 1963
Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Lucile Giles that Dr. King will be notified of her books upon his return to the office.

Letter from Student Supporter Richard Hathaway to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Richard Hathaway, a student at Haverford College, requests a copy of a speech Dr. King delivered at the United Nations Plaza. Hathaway was a participant in the march and rally at which Dr. King spoke, but was unable to hear the speech because of the crowd.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job. In this scripture, Job regains hope in the midst of tribulation.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to F. D. Kirkpatrick

Monday, March 4, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Rev. Abernathy commends Rev. Kirkpatrick on his job with the Steering Committee and discusses the enclosure of receipts.

Executive Director's Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Washington, D.C.

William A. Rutherford sends an informal report to the SCLC Executive Board in Washington, D.C. This is Rutherford's first report as an administrator of the organization and it purposes the ways in which the SCLC can better utilize, and apply, their resources.

Letter to William H. Andrews from MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the members of the Georgia Family Circle's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the inability of the SCLC's continuance of the movement in Birmingham without their "dollars for freedom." He further expounds on the importance of their moral support.

Letter from MLK to Joe C. Sullivan Jr.

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Texas (TX)

Dr. King thanks Joe Sullivan for his previous correspondence supporting the civil rights movement and the implementation of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Dr. King expresses how he will use nonviolence against those who believe in segregation.

Sermon on Conformity Thought "Nonconformist - J. Bond"

Sunday, January 16, 1966
VIETNAM, FRANCE

Dr. King in this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church speaks to his congregation on the topic of disent. He expresses in detail about how we essentially must not conform to standards set by society.

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966
Utah (UT), Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Svend Eril Stybe

Friday, February 7, 1964
DENMARK

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak in Copenhagen, Denmark at the request of the Student Association. He graciously turns down the invitation stating that he has made the "firm decision" to spend more time in the American South in order to focus on civil rights work.

Protest from Dallas County: Regarding The Community Action Program

Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

This petition from the Dallas County-based Self-Help Against Poverty with Everyone (SHAPE) requests for an immediate investigation into "the problems and circumstances surrounding the efforts for the anti-poverty program" in Dallas County.

Letter from Edward Gulick to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962
Massachusetts (MA)

Edward Gulick of Wellesley College writes Dr. King, expressing his appreciation and admiration for the work Dr. King has done in Massachusetts and elsewhere.

Progress

Dr. King quotes from Browning's "A Death in the Desert."

Worship

Dr. King defines worship.

Letter from Charles Armstrong to Robert Ruper

Friday, February 2, 1968
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Charles Armstrong, Publisher & Editor of the South Suburban News, writes to the Executive Vice President and CEO of Phillip Morris, Robert Ruper. In response to lack of funding provided to black communities, Dr. King, Jesse Jackson, and other leaders spark a nationwide boycott, Operation Breadbasket. Mr. Armstrong urges Mr. Ruper to comply with recent demands concerning acts discrimination within Phillip Morris.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

In this draft telegram, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to President Kennedy for the Executive Order outlawing discrimination in all federally assisted housing.

Statement by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee on the Kerner Commission Report

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

This statement put forth by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee addresses the results of the Kerner Commission Report, in which the author stresses that without creating viable and integrated communities in our cities "we shall have no cities".

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA)

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.