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"UNITED KINGDOM"

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Adlai Stevenson, the United States Representative to the United Nations, invites Dr. King to attend an upcoming meeting "to discuss current developments" in policy decisions on Africa.

Letter from MLK to Reverend W.E. Gardner

Wednesday, February 28, 1962

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of the First Baptist Church in Long Island, New York.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

Postcard Addressed to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

Father Martin Genghty of New York issued this postcard to Rev. Ralph Abernathy following Dr. King's assassination. The holy leader referred to Rev. Abernathy as "the Good Shepherd for his flock."

Statement by MLK on Perjury Charges

Wednesday, February 17, 1960

Dr. King addresses his indictment for perjury supposedly related to improperly filed Alabama state tax returns. He points out that the tax auditor who assured him that his returns were accurate is the person bringing the charges. He proposes a group of distinguished citizens to review his books and report their findings and concludes by stating that his conscience is clear.

Letter from Neil Sullivan to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

In this letter, Superintendent of Schools Neil Sullivan writes about the complete integration of the Berkeley County Public Schools.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Mills to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

This letter from a couple in Austin, Texas is a "message of encouragement" to Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, recently appointed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Zephaniah and Knowledge

Dr. King places the biblical prophet Zephaniah historically and cites Zephaniah 3:12 and 3:17 on knowledge received from God.

Letter from MLK to Keith Black

Thursday, June 9, 1966

Dr. King thanks Keith Black and the Valley Community Presbyterian Church for their contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, stating the progress and upcoming goals of the organization.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Friday, July 1, 1966

This program outlines the prevalent social and economic disadvantages of the Negro population of Chicago. The authors give detailed accounts on the presence of impoverished areas and ghettos that systematically oppress African American opportunities for education, housing, and employment. In the past, Negroes have begged, pleaded, and reasoned with white city officials to change community conditions.

Letter from Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967

The American Ambassador in Anman, Jordan encourages Dr. King to not reconsider his upcoming pilgrimage to the Middle East. Despite the turbulent political situation in the region, cancellation of the well-publicized trip would generate "distinct disadvantages" and much disappointment.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Revelation as a Way of Knowing

Dr. King quotes and discusses Henry Nelson Wieman’s view of revelation and knowledge as described in “The Source of Human Good.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Letter to Ruth D. Beyer from Dorothy Gaines

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Dorothy Gaines provides Ruth D. Beyer with the address of the Montgomery Improvement Association due to the possibility of a check lost in the mail.

Ebenezer Baptist Church Apartment Complex

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Ralph D. Abernathy informs Mr. J. Lafayette Morgan that he is unable to supply the information Mr. Morgan requested.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Geraldine Fones

Friday, January 12, 1968

Ms. McDonald informs Ms. Fones that Dr. King will not be able to speak to the Oxford Union Society in London due to commitments in the United States around the same time frame.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Our Pastor: A Characterization of Dr. Martin Luther King Sr.

This document portrays a picture of Dr. King Sr. with an excerpt written by Emily Dodson McCrary.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

William Kivi references a statement made by Dr. King at the SCLC convention pertaining to everyone having a "guaranteed income." Kivi's belief is that Republican officials in the state of California continue to chisel away at federal programs designed to give the poor access to health care and other government aid. His recommendation to Dr. King as a solution would be a "restructured national civil service."

When Peace Becomes Obnoxious

This 1956 newspaper column is a re-print of a sermon delivered by Dr. King on segregation and events in Alabama.

The Leaguers, Inc. Ceremony Program

Thursday, May 2, 1963

This program details the "Ground Breaking Ceremony" of The Leaguers, a Head Start program out of Newark, New Jersey. This organization has continuously provided community services geared towards children and family development. It is also the oldest incorporated African-American non-profit in the state.

Letter from Stuart E. Atkinson to the SCLC

Stuart E. Atkinson sends a donation to the SCLC and requests the address to which he should send donated clothing and toys.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Jesus

Dr. King outlines some thoughts on the effect Jesus' life had on his followers.

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Friday, April 2, 1965

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

MLK Speaks on Church Bombing in Birmingham, AL

Monday, September 16, 1963

Dr. King speaks on the bombing at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church that killed four girls in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to George T. Raymond of the Chester, Pennsylvania NAACP

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King declines the Chester Branch of the NAACP's invitation to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter to MLK from the Lutheran Standard Regarding Publishing

In this letter, George H. Muedeking, the editor of The Lutheran Standard, inquires if his publication can publish an advertisement of Dr. King's that was in The New York Times.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Thursday, August 22, 1963

This letter announces that the Gandhi Society for Human Rights, Incorporated is sponsoring a benefit concert, for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, at Carnegie Hal,l in New York City. Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra and Lena Horne are listed as some of the spotlight performers for this concert.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.